RetouchPRO

RetouchPRO (http://www.retouchpro.com/forums/)
-   Contests (http://www.retouchpro.com/forums/contests/)
-   -   Aug-Sep 2014 Contest Discussion (http://www.retouchpro.com/forums/contests/37933-aug-sep-2014-contest-discussion.html)

daygraphics 08-14-2014 01:05 PM

Re: Aug-Sep 2014 Merge Channels Contest
 
Pretty nice. Agree on the Yellow being a tad bit over exposed. In fact, each of these successive shots could be varying in exposure - and in directions not conducive to a good merge. Not sure I understand what you mean by "being kept in different channels" and weathering differently? I believe this is "one" single strip of film, shot in a camera in successive exposures, with the photographer simply advancing the film a full frame to accept the new capture. Then, this download is simply a Black & White contact sheet of that film.

kuasar 08-14-2014 01:06 PM

Re: Aug-Sep 2014 Merge Channels Contest
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by venanzio (Post 322797)
My first cut at it. a very interesting problem

I think you may have mistaken two channels. Try swaping them ;).

daygraphics 08-14-2014 01:08 PM

Re: Aug-Sep 2014 Merge Channels Contest
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by edgework (Post 322803)
Fun stuff.

Pretty nice...

kuasar 08-14-2014 01:10 PM

Re: Aug-Sep 2014 Merge Channels Contest
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by daygraphics (Post 322814)
Pretty nice. Agree on the Yellow being a tad bit over exposed. In fact, each of these successive shots could be varying in exposure - and in direction not conducive to a good merge. Not sure I understand what you mean by "being kept in different channels" and weathering differently? I believe this is one single strip of film, shot in a camera in successive exposure, with the photographer simply advancing the film a full frame to accept the new capture. Then this download is simply a Black & White contact sheet of that film.

Of course they're on a strip... only it is not different exposures what differs from each of them, it's the filter. They were actually captured using a filter in what is known as the Harris Shutter Effect. That the red filter is overexposed is actually a mistake from the photographer. See here how I write about correcting the levels on each still before anything else? They should have all been taken with the same exposure but across different color filters.

In the end we have three different images, and that implies that each shot has different exposure to time and has had different marks made on it that will affect each channel differently (see the blue channel has even some figures written on?). If you were to retouch a single old still, you'd just have to make your way dodging+burning, stamping, healing... whatever. But here marks are done to just one of the three channels. So if you want to remove the cyan spots you just have to retouch the red channel. And if you want to remove the magenta markings you'd retouch the green channel (and thus saving 66% of the information intact).

daygraphics 08-14-2014 02:25 PM

Re: Aug-Sep 2014 Merge Channels Contest
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by kuasar (Post 322817)
Of course they're on a strip... only it is not different exposures what differs from each of them, it's the filter. They were actually captured using a filter in what is known as the Harris Shutter Effect. That the red filter is overexposed is actually a mistake from the photographer. See here how I write about correcting the levels on each still before anything else? They should have all been taken with the same exposure but across different color filters.

In the end we have three different images, and that implies that each shot has different exposure to time and has had different marks made on it that will affect each channel differently (see the blue channel has even some figures written on?). If you were to retouch a single old still, you'd just have to make your way dodging+burning, stamping, healing... whatever. But here marks are done to just one of the three channels. So if you want to remove the cyan spots you just have to retouch the red channel. And if you want to remove the magenta markings you'd retouch the green channel (and thus saving 66% of the information intact).

That writing you see on that channel is actually scratched into the negative, on the emulsion side. Pretty common thing to do. Even with negs going back only 10-15 years.
And I think I said pretty much what you just reiterated. Same concept applied not to long ago in in-camera separations for the print industry. Separate exposures (with filter in lens) to filter out unwanted light. About the different marks... that is simply a matter of the negative being damaged (scratched) and or the exposure to the contact being dirty (dust, dirt, etc) at different locations along the strip. Yes, you can retouch within individual channels without having to retouch all 3 channels simultaneously to remove the aberrations. Good observation.

kuasar 08-14-2014 02:51 PM

Re: Aug-Sep 2014 Merge Channels Contest
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by daygraphics (Post 322823)
That writing you see on that channel is actually scratched into the negative, on the emulsion side. Pretty common thing to do. Even with negs going back only 10-15 years.
And I think I said pretty much what you just reiterated. Same concept applied not to long ago in in-camera separations for the print industry. Separate exposures (with filter in lens) to filter out unwanted light. About the different marks... that is simply a matter of the negative being damaged (scratched) and or the exposure to the contact being dirty (dust, dirt, etc) at different locations along the strip. Yes, you can retouch within individual channels without having to retouch all 3 channels simultaneously to remove the aberrations. Good observation.

I agreed that they are different shots on a strip, I just pointed out that they are not actually different exposures (meaning different light ranges) but stills shot through different color filters, which is not exactly the same. Yes, the marks are negatives being damaged, that's what I meant with "weathering" and retouching single channels.

On the other hand, chromatic aberrations are not these marks by the way. Chromatic aberration is due to different focal points for different light waves (colors), resulting in the fringing effect that can be seen around the guys that move in between shots (specially the one in the center). This does not refer to the markings on the negative and this is something I resolved by locally realigning manually the channels.

daygraphics 08-14-2014 04:33 PM

Re: Aug-Sep 2014 Merge Channels Contest
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by kuasar (Post 322825)
I agreed that they are different shots on a strip, I just pointed out that they are not actually different exposures (meaning different light ranges) but stills shot through different color filters, which is not exactly the same. Yes, the marks are negatives being damaged, that's what I meant with "weathering" and retouching single channels.

On the other hand, chromatic aberrations are not these marks by the way. Chromatic aberration is due to different focal points for different light waves (colors), resulting in the fringing effect that can be seen around the guys that move in between shots (specially the one in the center). This does not refer to the markings on the negative and this is something I resolved by locally realigning manually the channels.

I think you and I are playing semantics. I like your connection to the Harris Shutter Effect, by the way! Simply stated, chromatic aberration was a constant in the days of old time color photography. People always moved. Heck, even the photographer handling the camera - ever so gingerly - can bump the registration.The solution to it in this contest, can be handled in a multitude of ways. Each will do what works best for them, I myself handled the movement of the center man by individually morphing that selective area to align within the frames of the existing borders. Exposure was also always a problem, as the shutter speed was a manual setting. This certainly did not account for the sun getting a little brighter or the sky a bit cloudier during the course of a session. You and I can now just concentrate on making our finals the very best they can be. I know I have some work ahead of me on that front!

daygraphics 08-14-2014 04:49 PM

Re: Aug-Sep 2014 Merge Channels Contest
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by justanartist (Post 322831)
Not sure if this worked? Seems like uploading could be the hardest part about this site..LOL. Thanks for any help!

SURE DID WORK. Looks very nice. Great color saturation and tone. Fine tune it up, if you feel it needs some and your a bonafide candidate - at least in my book!

kuasar 08-14-2014 04:59 PM

Re: Aug-Sep 2014 Merge Channels Contest
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by daygraphics (Post 322832)
I think you and I are playing semantics. I like your connection to the Harris Shutter Effect, by the way! Simply stated, chromatic aberration was a constant in the days of old time color photography. People always moved. Heck, even the photographer handling the camera - ever so gingerly - can bump the registration.The solution to it in this contest, can be handled in a multitude of ways. Each will do what works best for them, I myself handled the movement of the center man by individually morphing that selective area to align within the frames of the existing borders. Exposure was also always a problem, as the shutter speed was a manual setting. This certainly did not account for the sun getting a little brighter or the sky a bit cloudier during the course of a session. You and I can now just concentrate on making our finals the very best they can be. I know I have some work ahead of me on that front!

Agree on everything :)

justanartist 08-14-2014 09:54 PM

Re: Aug-Sep 2014 Merge Channels Contest
 
Thanks DG!
I spent about two hours on it. Too many steps involved, I easily could have spent another two hours on this one! One thing that helped me speed up the registration process was to go to the channels panel and pick each channel and then press the tilde key which let me see through everything. Then I simply used the move tool and arrow keys to line everything up.
Of course as most found out they didn't line up perfectly due to time lags in the photographers shutter release, environmental conditions, minute movements in the subjects and slight focusing differences.
Color correction was done by selecting channels and using the levels to enhance contrast. Sharpening was done on the channels. Some spot healing on the damaged negatives. A really fun project!


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:29 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2016 Doug Nelson. All Rights Reserved