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Contests Retouching contests to challenge your skills and learn from others. Prizes for the winners!

March 05 Contest Discussion

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  #61  
Old 03-16-2005, 02:43 PM
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TwinbNJ TwinbNJ is offline
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T Paul - did you use the CMYK curves adjustment layers Tut on Worth 1000?

That is the one I used and do agree it gets you the base for your colors.
I do not think there is getting around adding painted layers in normal, color, soft light modes or using solft light layers with white and black. This helps add the subtle skin tone changes, depth, and lighting. I also used Neat Image to clean up some of the noise in the original.
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  #62  
Old 03-16-2005, 04:01 PM
Sean2 Sean2 is offline
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Colorization.

Hello,

I leaned heavily on the color replacement tool and brush fading, as well as lots of lady luck :-)

I edited the first post under Sean2, as it seemed to be outside the "expected" or professional restoring expectations. Hopefully the second one will be a little better. The collection is simply amazing and I look forward to reading how everybody accomplished what they did. lots of first time efforts that are excellent, and the senior member stuff surely provides us something to shoot for.

I enjoy being part of this group and the tremendous tutorials.

Thank you

Sean
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  #63  
Old 03-16-2005, 04:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinbNJ
T Paul - did you use the CMYK curves adjustment layers Tut on Worth 1000?

That is the one I used and do agree it gets you the base for your colors.

I didn’t used the CMYK tutorial, instead I followed the Worth 1000 Primary Color Tutorial. Basically you create a blue layer, a red layer and a gold layer applying a mask to each and adjusting the amount each layer lets through.
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  #64  
Old 03-16-2005, 04:48 PM
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My basic approach to this contest:

Restore:
1. First I needed to clean up the image, before I even thought about applying color.
2. Ran the image through Neat Image to quickly reduce the spotty texture
3. There were still some spotty areas so I used the blur tool, healing brush, clone tool etc to clean these areas up.
4. Ran the highlight/shadow filter in Photoshop CS to brighten up the shadows and bring out some lost detail
5. Then I did a Levels Adjustment to even out the tone

Colorize:
1. Now it was time to add some color
2. First I flattened my work from cleaning the image and made a copy of the image and opened it up as a new file to work on (saving all my restoration layers as a separate file...always like to have something to go back to just in case).
3. I followed the Worth 1000 Primary Color tutorial…made three new layers (red, blue and gold), added layer masks, and started adjusting according to the tutorial. This produced good results, but I still wanted to fine tune the colors so I switched to a brush.
4. I created new layers for the various elements…leaves, rose, hair, eyes and so on and used a brush to add more precise color. These layers were set to color or soft light and the opacities were adjusted as necessary.
5. Applied a Selective Color adjustment layer to fine tune some colors
6. Added a hue/sat adjustment layer to boost the colors just a tad.
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  #65  
Old 03-16-2005, 08:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sean2
I leaned heavily on the color replacement tool and brush fading, as well as lots of lady luck :-)
I have never - at least to my knowledge-- used these tools - where are they and how do you use it? -- always interested in new styles.

T Paul - I saw the tut you used and got confused - LOL
The one I used Color Tut with mask and curves finally gave me insight to layer masks and how easy they are to use. Now the curvse side was a bit challenging to say the least - but I just "played" till I got the base result - as both methods will give you. To get more depth you need to work the blend modes and colors in layers. It kinda gives you the artist side of the colorization. That is what makes each submission different. Neat image, or like programs, was needed to start with on the image in my opinion.
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  #66  
Old 03-16-2005, 08:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sean2
Hello,
I edited the first post under Sean2, as it seemed to be outside the "expected" or professional restoring expectations. Hopefully the second one will be a little better.
I ask "outside expected" expectations. I do not know about others but I am including "this is my first color" and "have never tried this" in judging. Those of us who are considered "older" members are going to be judged in a harsher light ---- <g> I am old !
This should not stop anyone who feels they are up against "old timers" - jump in and give this a shot. It's not an easy challenge --- this is one that you will learn from, and that is what this is all about!
When I down load the images for the final numbers to judge I am naming with extentions novice, medium, expert to the image (not the artist name) to help me judge.

Hope to see more entries and styles used to colorize.
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  #67  
Old 03-16-2005, 09:04 PM
Sean2 Sean2 is offline
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Hello Jill,

I am probably calling them by the incorrect name, as I was only introduced to painting and Photoshop in December of 2005, if you haven't used them before.

The color replacement tool is located immediately above the cloning tool box. It has the single brush and the eye as its icon. You select your color with option click and replace the existing color - grey /black / white etc... and set the "brush" size as usual.

The brush fade - paint the area in location and keep tyhe mouse depressed until finished or alternate strokes and fade differently, depending on intent. The fade is located under the edit column, 4th from the top. It provides lots of headaches and flexibility - and not just with paint.

Hope that explains it.

Sean
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  #68  
Old 03-16-2005, 09:15 PM
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Great - off to PS to see this and play with it!
Thanks

As I have said before -- you can teach an old dog new tricks!
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  #69  
Old 03-16-2005, 09:28 PM
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Here is a screen capture of my image and the red, blue and gold layers. This was my initial work, using the Worth 1000 primary color tutorial.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg layers.jpg (96.4 KB, 25 views)
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  #70  
Old 03-16-2005, 09:36 PM
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T Paul T Paul is offline
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Here are a few more tutorials:
Color Replacement Tool

Color Replacement in Photoshop CS

Another way to use Replace Color:

Image>Adjustments>Replace Color

From the pop up window use the eye dropper to select the color you want to replace. Use the fuzziness slider to adjust the color sensitivity. Use the +eye dropper to add colors and the –eye dropper to remove colors. Once you are happy with your selection, change the color in the transform section by adjusting the hue, saturation, and lightness sliders until you have the color you want.

Check out this tutorial:
Using Replace Color

As for "fade", you have the general fade command that is located in the Edit column. This is a great way to reduce any command that you have just run and feel that you have over done it. There is also fade in reference to brush settings (I believe Photoshop 7 and up).

Fade is available as a brush option and you can use it with or without a pressure-sensitive tablet. When Fade is selected, you specify a value between 1 and 9999. The Fade command specifies either the value to which the stroke fades or when the specific jitter ends along the stroke. Click on the brushes pallet, then click on the area next to brushes to expand the options. The fade option in one of the control option under the shape dynamics, color dynamics and other dynamics selections.

Brushes in 7

Photoshop Shape Dynamics

Photoshop 7: Using Brush Shapes and Textures

Last edited by T Paul; 03-16-2005 at 09:42 PM.
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