RetouchPRO

Go Back   RetouchPRO > Technique > Critiques
Register Blogs FAQ Site Nav Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Critiques The place to get serious, in-depth analysis and opinions of your work

need help removing spots, stains, etc

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 12-28-2005, 03:48 PM
dasailr03 dasailr03 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 24
need help removing spots, stains, etc

need a lil help removing the white stains, dust , etc. please advise

large size photo: http://www.imag.us/x/dmccorey/sample.jpg
Attached Images
File Type: jpg sample2.jpg (66.1 KB, 119 views)

Last edited by dasailr03; 12-28-2005 at 04:01 PM.
Reply With Quote top
  #2  
Old 12-28-2005, 05:32 PM
Duv's Avatar
Duv Duv is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Nanaimo, British Columbia
Posts: 1,213
I can't help you with your request but your corrected image appears to have too much blue or cyan in the skin and hair. Either reduce the cyan or boost up the magenta and yellow. This is a little contrasty but you'll get the idea.

Cheers
Dave
Attached Images
File Type: jpg D-Girl.jpg (86.6 KB, 49 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #3  
Old 12-29-2005, 12:49 AM
Craig Walters's Avatar
Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: somewhere over there
Posts: 8,786
Blog Entries: 4
when i first saw your images, desailr03, i was a bit puzzled as to why you wanted help. it seemed from the before and after that you'd been doing a great job in cleaning up the tears and so on. and then i noticed the dreaded 'mold white'. that's that whitish, hazy, sort of faded, sort of 'what in the hell is that' kind of thing. and you've got a fair amount of it in this picture.

well, i hate that stuff and have had trouble in the past in cleaning it up on other images. it's a pain. so, i decided i could use the practice and took a shot.

now bear with me on this one, because the workflow on this was real scattered. i'd try one thing, undo it, try another and so on and i'm not real certain exactly what i did in whole. but, i do know the first thing i did was to add a contrast/lighten adjustment layer and bring up the contrast. this by itself will remove a certain amount of that haze. after that it was to do what Duv did and remove some of the blue cast throughout the image. i used another adjustment layer for that, a color balance one.

after those actions it becomes a bit more fuzzy as to what all i did. i duplicated the layer again and did a fair amount of the lighten/darken tool using mostly the darken part to bring that haze down even more.

there were some masking attempts but i mostly un-did those as i was happy with them for the most part.

i duplicated the layer again and did a lot of smudge and clone on various areas. some of this was just on the background and borders and some on her arms in cleaning those up and filling them in. but part was on various areas of her face also. the face and neck smudge/clone was done as lightly as possible to achieve a result but not lose texture and clarity. but the smudge/clone was mostly not done to remove the whitish haze. that was mostly done with the lighten/darken tool at about a 30% opacity setting.

it's not perfect, but it's certainly better and i hope that helps a bit.

craig
Attached Images
File Type: jpg girl-in-blue-1-k-1.jpg (93.1 KB, 54 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #4  
Old 12-29-2005, 08:28 AM
philbach's Avatar
philbach philbach is offline
Senior Member
Patron
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Belgium, Wi
Posts: 1,332
Remove Stains

Well I felt in this case that just replacing the background would be easier than removing the spots.

I did that by selecting the girl and putting her on a separate layer. Then beneath her I added a new layer and filled it with a tan color. I used a sandstone texture filter and a render clouds filter on the background. I also used a curves adjustment layer to lighten up her head area while masking out the lightness effect away from the head.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg removespots.jpg (12.3 KB, 48 views)

Last edited by philbach; 12-29-2005 at 08:32 AM. Reason: more info to post
Reply With Quote top
  #5  
Old 12-29-2005, 08:48 AM
dasailr03 dasailr03 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 24
thanks for the tips

thanks for the tips. i'm going to try them. i've made a few adjustment but still having problem with the underlying white spots. Is there a process I can use on the actual photograph to elimate as many flaws as possible prior to scanning.
Reply With Quote top
  #6  
Old 12-29-2005, 09:20 AM
Craig Walters's Avatar
Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: somewhere over there
Posts: 8,786
Blog Entries: 4
on the original photograph you want to be very careful. 'white spots' could be anything from mold to dust to overexposure to something completely different. and, unless you know exactly what it is and how to remove it or color over it, i wouldnt touch the original with an expert conservator with me, other than a soft brush light dusting. it is HIGHLY recommended not to mess with the original! if that gets screwed up then you're really sunk. if you mess up a digital, no biggie; you just scan again or make another copy and try again, but with the original there is no try again. once it's gone, it's gone.

one thing you can do, perhaps, is to check your scanner for dust and smudges. the glass plate surface on a scanner oftens picks up dust and smudges and therefore gets transferred onto a scanned image. so, cleaning that every so often is a good idea. just bear in mind that you're cleaning something sitting over a bunch of electronics and electronis do NOT like water.

if you really want to try to fix the original, i'd check your local yellow pages or do a google search for conservators and then check them out pretty well with references and so on. like any other profession there are probably good ones and bad ones.

now, i do believe there are a few tips on this forum for cleaning photos, but i'd check those tips on photos you can afford to waste before doing them on something you really want to keep. there are probably web sites that could guide you also, but again, test on non-valuable pictures first.

craig
Reply With Quote top
  #7  
Old 12-31-2005, 04:46 PM
dasailr03 dasailr03 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 24
thanks was just wondering if there a simple fix i could try. funny thing is i have a lot of photographs with the same white spread. any other advice anyone? i'll work on the background & skin blemishes once i get rid of that white film.
Reply With Quote top
  #8  
Old 12-31-2005, 06:25 PM
Ed_L's Avatar
Ed_L Ed_L is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: northwest Indiana, about 45 minutes from Chicago, IL
Posts: 2,824
I'm not sure just what that is, but it looks similar to what is known as "silvering" in an old B&W photo (but it's not). Here's a link to a tutorial on that subject. Depending on what that is, it *might* help if you try scanning that way.

Ed
Reply With Quote top
  #9  
Old 01-01-2006, 07:57 AM
Craig Walters's Avatar
Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: somewhere over there
Posts: 8,786
Blog Entries: 4
dasailr03,

i'm no expert on this stuff, but if it's mold you might want to check this thread out: http://www.retouchpro.com/forums/sho...highlight=mold i have seen this white film on images before and if i remember correctly, it's usually ones that have been subjected to moisture of some kind, so i would suspect it's a mold or fungus of some kind. but that's just my suspicion. check with a conservator to be sure.

craig
Reply With Quote top
  #10  
Old 01-01-2006, 05:21 PM
bart_hickman's Avatar
bart_hickman bart_hickman is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 479
Mostly the blue channel

The haze looks like it's mostly in the blue channel (which was greatly amplified by the way you changed the color balance.) So I did two things to the blue channel:
1. Create a difference layer and put dark grey (32) on most of that layer--ie., I subtracted 32 from the blue channel. I did a little bit of brushing with slightly lighter grey in some areas to remove some more blue.
2. Did a curve to further accentuate the dark blues (in the approximate range from 0 to 64)

This is really quick and basic and I'm sure it could be done better, but maybe it'll inspire some other techniques.

Another thought: perhaps you have a problem with photo texture? If so, then you should scan the image at 0 and 180 degrees and combine the two to eliminate that. This would also get rid of some of those bands that I think are due to the photo having been slightly folded or creased in some places.

Bart
Attached Images
File Type: jpg sample2.jpg (41.7 KB, 28 views)
Reply With Quote top
Reply

  RetouchPRO > Technique > Critiques


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to remove stains or spots from a photo Gerald McClaren Photo Restoration 17 07-11-2012 05:10 AM
Removing Stains k4tj3 Image Help 4 10-11-2007 07:03 PM
Help for a newbie :) removing unknown stains.... heart Photo Restoration 11 01-22-2006 06:24 AM
Removing color stains Zarxrax Photo Retouching 6 05-20-2005 11:57 AM
Need help removing blotchy stains from B&W photo jeaniesa Image Help 28 08-25-2001 10:41 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright © 2016 Doug Nelson. All Rights Reserved