RetouchPRO

Go Back   RetouchPRO > Tools > Hardware
Register Blogs FAQ Site Nav Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Hardware Computers, displays, tablets, scanners, cameras, printers, etc.

Which Monitor for Photo Editing 2010

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 06-27-2010, 10:05 AM
Carol Heath's Avatar
Carol Heath Carol Heath is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Posts: 71
Re: Which Monitor for Photo Editing 2010

Thanks for that great response Andrew (even though I don't completely understand it all I will need to go back over your slides from today's webinar). I have been checking out both Eizo and NEC monitors and am struggling with the choice. I was able to compare the two at a recent imaging expo here in Melbourne and was tending toward the NEC but Eizo offer a five year warranty which is a pretty impressive selling point. Still confused.

The two monitors I am looking at (within my budget) are the Eizo SX2462W 24 Inch (AU $2212.00) and the NEC PA241W 24 Inch (AU$2075.00) Would you consider one to be a much better choice than the other?

Carol

Quote:
Originally Posted by andrewrodney View Post
The NEC SpectraView II line, with their software driving it and a supported instrument is IMHO the best bang for the buck for a calibrated display. Apple hasn’t built anything at all impressive in years. Eizo are excellent but far more expensive than NEC and I’ve yet to see anything that warrants the extra money. LaCie doesn’t make anything (they OEM parts from others).

The big deal about the NEC and Eizo are they are considered “smart monitor” that use high bit data in the panel (not the graphic system), along with software that controls the panel hardware to calibrate that hardware. It means you don’t have to be messing around pushing buttons on the OSD to get to a desired target calibration, the software talks to the display and controls it in a far more precise fashion. It means you can build multiple calibration targets and load them to update the calibration and the associated ICC profile. Consider soft proofing to a matt paper versus a glossy paper. Big difference in contrast ratio. With these smart monitors, you can build a calibration target of say TRC Gamma 2.2, 150cd/m2 (which matches your viewing booth), and a white point of D65 with a contrast ratio of 150:1. Now you want the same settings but for the glossy paper, you want a contrast ratio of 300:1. Build one of each, switch on the fly. The software updates the calibration based on the paper and adjusts the contrast ratio.

And if you don’t own a measuring instrument, the bundled price of one with the software is not only a bargain but if you end up with a wide gamut display, NEC has a special EyeOne Display-2 with filters in it mated for this panel. That’s the best instrument you can purchase for this unit.
Reply With Quote top
  #22  
Old 06-27-2010, 11:36 AM
andrewrodney's Avatar
andrewrodney andrewrodney is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Santa Fe
Posts: 1,090
Re: Which Monitor for Photo Editing 2010

I think NEC, at least in the US is four year warranty. The Eizo is a fine unit but the additional cost over the NEC seems excessive to me.
Reply With Quote top
  #23  
Old 07-24-2010, 09:01 PM
Leroy Brown Leroy Brown is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 5
Re: Which Monitor for Photo Editing 2010

Quote:
Originally Posted by joemartinezjr View Post
I work on 23" Apple cinema displays at work all day, I recently purchased a new 24" Lacie monitor for home and I am sold on the Lacie. A couple reasons; (95% Adobe RGB / 99.7% of ISO Coated) This allows you to see and articulate details in dark areas. The Apple crunches detail and I also end up over saturating colors on the cinema display. Also the Apple displays have a pinkish hue cast unless you go for the 30 incher. If you are familiar with the Adobe 1998 color space there is no doubt you will be floored by the wide gamut Lacie display. If you ever plan on printing an image this is by far the best choice, because this way you will actually see everything that will be printed and it will take away any guess work. Man, I love my lacie! You can nab it from BnH for $865, solid. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...creen_LCD.html
I will be in the market for my first photo editing monitor. Want to do it right the first time around. Looking at LaCie as I read that some models can do over 100% in NTSC and Adobe RGB (I shoot in Adobe RGB). Are the LaCie "the best" monitors around because they an do 100% plus?

I'm also looking at the Dell U2711 a 27" that has had good reviews. Is accurate out of the box though I plan on buying a Colormunki to calibrate it and my future photo printer (Epson R1900 or R2880 or maybe the R3880).

And why are the NEC's so highly rated? I am looking at the 2480 and 3090 too. Love to get a 30". What is the "best" 30" monitor? Are the NEC Spectra series twice as good as the Dell U2711? Warranting the near high premium over the Dell?

The EIZO have always been highly regarded but they "only" do 97% Adobe RGB gamut. Thought they would also pass the 100% mark like some of the LaCie.

Last edited by Leroy Brown; 07-24-2010 at 09:07 PM.
Reply With Quote top
  #24  
Old 07-24-2010, 09:42 PM
andrewrodney's Avatar
andrewrodney andrewrodney is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Santa Fe
Posts: 1,090
Re: Which Monitor for Photo Editing 2010

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leroy Brown View Post
I will be in the market for my first photo editing monitor. Want to do it right the first time around. Looking at LaCie as I read that some models can do over 100% in NTSC and Adobe RGB (I shoot in Adobe RGB). Are the LaCie "the best" monitors around because they an do 100% plus?
This is a somewhat weak, marketing description of the size of the gamut. Bigger doesn’t equate to better, more “accurate” more easily calibrated etc.

Quote:
And why are the NEC's so highly rated?
Because they are designed from the ground up for being calibrated to what was once called a “reference display” (Barco, PressView, Artisan). This is where a manufacture builds a panel that is designed with a measuring instrument, software and so forth for the task of being calibrated and whereby when multiple users of the same system use the same calibration targets, they all match to a very high degree. Also known as “smart monitors” because once you describe the calibration targets you want, you click one button and the rest of the process is carried out using the software along with communications inside the panel. No buttons on the unit to press to affect brightness, color etc. The display and the software, along with the instrument all communicate to produce the desired calibration.

Quote:
The EIZO have always been highly regarded but they "only" do 97% Adobe RGB gamut. Thought they would also pass the 100% mark like some of the LaCie.
Again, forget the amounts of gamut spec here. Having an NEC or Eizo that does “97%” of a specified gamut, but does so with the integration and quality mentioned above will be a far better product than one having 101% of the Adobe RGB gamut but using inferior quality electronics, software or total calibration integration. Don’t get caught up in the marketing number hype. FWIW, LaCie doesn’t make squat. The OEM panels from others and slap their label on them. Some are actually NEC panels. The question is, does NEC supply the pick of the litter to LaCie or keep them for their high end solutions?
Reply With Quote top
  #25  
Old 07-25-2010, 12:14 AM
Leroy Brown Leroy Brown is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 5
Re: Which Monitor for Photo Editing 2010

Quote:
Originally Posted by andrewrodney View Post
Because they are designed from the ground up for being calibrated to what was once called a “reference display” (Barco, PressView, Artisan). This is where a manufacture builds a panel that is designed with a measuring instrument, software and so forth for the task of being calibrated and whereby when multiple users of the same system use the same calibration targets, they all match to a very high degree. Also known as “smart monitors” because once you describe the calibration targets you want, you click one button and the rest of the process is carried out using the software along with communications inside the panel. No buttons on the unit to press to affect brightness, color etc. The display and the software, along with the instrument all communicate to produce the desired calibration.
Could you not also say that about Dell's U2711 monitor? Even if that might really be a Samsung (or which ever company they are using now).

Quote:
Originally Posted by andrewrodney View Post
Again, forget the amounts of gamut spec here. Having an NEC or Eizo that does “97%” of a specified gamut, but does so with the integration and quality mentioned above will be a far better product than one having 101% of the Adobe RGB gamut but using inferior quality electronics, software or total calibration integration. Don’t get caught up in the marketing number hype. FWIW, LaCie doesn’t make squat. The OEM panels from others and slap their label on them. Some are actually NEC panels. The question is, does NEC supply the pick of the litter to LaCie or keep them for their high end solutions?
But, is it not important when buying to know that a monitor can do "97% Adobe RGB"? Whether those claims are spot on or marketing. What do we go on? There must be specs that are important to look out for. To tell us monitor A is better than monitor B. Or do we just go on reviews from magazines and forum members?

I'm looking at the Dell U2711 (27", $900 CAD). But the NEC Spectra series are highly regarded. So if I can be convinced they are worth their asking price I might pay for the NEC 26" 2690 ($1800 CAD) or even perhaps their 30" 3090 ($2300 CAD). Would like to get this right the first time around. I mean would a $900 27" wide gamut monitor like the Dell not be "good enough" for a hobbyist wanting a good calibrated monitor that can be matched with the out put from a calibrated photo printer?
Reply With Quote top
  #26  
Old 07-25-2010, 04:02 PM
andrewrodney's Avatar
andrewrodney andrewrodney is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Santa Fe
Posts: 1,090
Re: Which Monitor for Photo Editing 2010

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leroy Brown View Post
Could you not also say that about Dell's U2711 monitor? Even if that might really be a Samsung (or which ever company they are using now).
No experience, doubt they are anything special like NEC or Eizo because again, the key here is a display that’s built to take advantage of software and hardware from the design and ground up. Yes, you can buy such a display and a 3rd party kit (Spyder, EyeOne Display) but its not the same solution as this fully integrated system discussed above.
Reply With Quote top
  #27  
Old 07-25-2010, 05:11 PM
Leroy Brown Leroy Brown is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 5
Re: Which Monitor for Photo Editing 2010

Was wondering. What do you guys think of the screen used in the Apple iMac 27" computers. Do you think they can be calibrated to match the output from lets say an Epson R1900? Or would I still need to look at a wide gamut monitor like the NEC SpectraView series or the 27" Dell U2711? I'm sure some of you have had experience with the new iMacs.
Reply With Quote top
  #28  
Old 07-26-2010, 08:46 AM
andrewrodney's Avatar
andrewrodney andrewrodney is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Santa Fe
Posts: 1,090
Re: Which Monitor for Photo Editing 2010

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leroy Brown View Post
Was wondering. What do you guys think of the screen used in the Apple iMac 27" computers. Do you think they can be calibrated to match the output from lets say an Epson R1900? .
That device has a much wider gamut than the iMac display but the bigger issue is, its not that great a display and they are usually way too bright and Apple doesn’t make it easy (in some cases impossible) to target the luminance to match a print using a decent viewing booth/condition.
Reply With Quote top
  #29  
Old 08-12-2010, 08:05 AM
TopiToo TopiToo is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: London
Posts: 133
Re: Which Monitor for Photo Editing 2010

Hi

I found this link with regards to Apple 23" monitors, any other size in this range looks fine. http://www.dreamlight.com/insights/bugs/hd23.html
Reply With Quote top
  #30  
Old 08-12-2010, 10:00 AM
Leroy Brown Leroy Brown is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 5
Re: Which Monitor for Photo Editing 2010

Thanks for posting that link about the 23" ACD. I've already crossed Apple computers off my list for my next desktop computer. Will likely buy a Dell Studio 9000 and either a Dell U2711 or NEC PA271W wide-gamut monitor (and either an Epson R1900 or R3880...the 3880 only costs a few hundred dollars more..was on sale recently at a local photography shop for just under $1000.00 CAD...but I'm not buying now so...).

Mac Pro are just too pricey for what you get. You could get a comparably equipped Windows based computer for half as much. Possibly better equipped even.
Reply With Quote top
Reply

  RetouchPRO > Tools > Hardware


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
2010 Art Contest - Awards valued at $38,000 AgoraGallery Classifieds 0 12-31-2009 06:04 AM
Outsourcing editing services? gwynemark Photo Retouching 12 07-19-2009 12:35 AM
Is there any new editing software.... beth313 Software 11 05-03-2008 01:32 PM
Editing workflow john sr Photoshop Elements Help 2 03-31-2008 08:12 AM
New to all this editing stuff and need help !! Digiboy Image Help 11 02-23-2008 01:18 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:23 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright © 2016 Doug Nelson. All Rights Reserved