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History, Conservation, and Repair The history of photographic prints, and how best to care for and repair them.

Early 20th century photo postcards

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  #11  
Old 02-27-2003, 07:33 PM
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winwintoo winwintoo is offline
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Thanks for the info Neal. I haven't come across any more cards, but the ones I have are in a safe place. Actually, I've been bored lately, maybe it's time to go exploring and see if I can find any more of them.

Take care, Margaret
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  #12  
Old 02-27-2003, 08:50 PM
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thomasgeorge thomasgeorge is offline
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I have run across several "photo post cards" dating from the early 1900's thru around 1920 which are actually excellent examples of photomechanical reproduction. The cards themselves are sturdy...much more so than the standard photo of that period...additionally on the back is clearly printed "Postcard" and a place for the stamp is delineated. These can be identified, sometimes, by examination of the picture at around 30x magnification and looking for the telltale "dots" or screen pattern...however there were processes such as Woodbury and Carbon print which donot have the screen pattern and can be tough to differentiate. However, if the picture is unusually clear and sharp with well defined tones, it is probably, though not definately, a photomechanical print. That doesnot really detract from its value from an historical point however, as it is the image itself which has value, not necessairly the method used to produce it.....Original photos do have value as process artifacts but in the long run the image itself is what has the most value...just because there are no original copies of Plato laying around doesnot detract from the value of the reproduced writings....Tom
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  #13  
Old 02-27-2003, 09:14 PM
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winwintoo winwintoo is offline
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Is it proper to take a magnifying glass into the antique store to examine them??

I never know how to behave in such situations and wouldn't like to flub it.

I don't know if I mentioned it here before, but i used to have in my possession a shoebox full of postcards that were sent by an individual as he made his way around the world in 1905/06. What happened to them? Let me just say I was 21, I had needs. I can't watch Antiques Road Show without flinching.

Take care, Margaret
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  #14  
Old 02-27-2003, 09:22 PM
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thomasgeorge thomasgeorge is offline
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I do and other collectors I know are not one bit shy about closely examining a photo with a loope or pocket microscope....after all, it's your money which will purchase the photo and you have a right to check out a potential purchase. Any shop which wont allow you to closely examine an item should be avoided...Tom
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  #15  
Old 03-29-2003, 02:25 PM
Celtic Yob Celtic Yob is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Gelligaer, Wales, UK.
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Hi
This is my first entry in your forum.
I have a question, does anyone know what I can use to clean colour transparencies?
The photos are over fifty years old; the subjects are mostly of the coalmines that once were here in South Wales. Although the valleys are green once more, photos are all that is left and are valuable.
This part of the forum seems to be the appropriate place to ask this question.
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  #16  
Old 03-31-2003, 07:08 AM
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thomasgeorge thomasgeorge is offline
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Unless you have training and experience, it is better to take the transparencies or any other type of photo to a Conservator to have it done. You could check with a local Museum as they probably have a list of places which could assist you. It would also be a good idea to make hi res scans of the transparencies before any work is done to preserve the image just in case something untoward should occur. Some may differ in opinion from what I suggest but as you pointed out these are valuable historic documents and should be cared for in an appropriate manner.
Capturing a hi res scan allows you to make copies for display while keeping the handling of the originals to a limited degree. You also might want to inquire about proper storage methods to help preserve them. Good lick, Tom
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