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History, Conservation, and Repair The history of photographic prints, and how best to care for and repair them.

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  #11  
Old 01-17-2003, 06:00 PM
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Lampy Lampy is offline
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Lightbulb Camera settings / Contact Sheets for CDs

Not sure how your camera works but mine, an Olympus C-2500L produced Jpegs for low and high resolution and Tiff for super high resolution images. Check and see if you have different settings. You will find it useful to be able to change it. I use the super high resolution for client stuff (conservation before and after treatment)... but I can only fit about 20 shots on my CF card. When I'm taking family snaps I'll put it on high res and I can get a hundred or so. If I'm on vacation and don't have my laptop handy I'll flip it to medium and get a couple of hundred...they're still good enough for 4x6 shots from Ofoto or Shutterfly.

If you take it off your camera as a Jpeg and you plan on playing with it and saving it a bunch of times in photoshop just be sure the first time you save to change it to either psd or tiff so you don't run into the loss problem talked about earlier.

About record keeping on a CD. Here is what I have done in the past. I group things into time periods. i.e. Jan-June 2002 and so on. I print a list of the image names (or clients names) out and put it into the front of the CD case with the title (month/year) at the top. Once I've got the entire CD burned I'll create a contact sheet in photoshop. If you've never done this give it a try.

In photoshop:
File > Automate > Contact Sheets
Click browse and choose your CD drive (or whatever)...if you have multiple folders choose that option and it will pull all the pictures from all the folders. Photoshop will creat contact pages for you...then print them, fold them up, put them in your CD case and bingo you've got instant reference!

Just so you know photoshop includes the file name under each thumbnail so you don't really have to print out a list if you don't want to. I just do it because it makes my life easier looking for a specific client name first then for the image.

Hope this helps.

--Heather
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  #12  
Old 01-18-2003, 08:34 AM
cinderella cinderella is offline
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Thanks Heather for all the info. Now I can organize my photos on CD. Do you still keep yours on your HD after you put them on CD?

I did look at my Olympus camera manual last nite and see that I have TIFF options as well as HI,LOw,standard options in JPEG. Wish I could do some of my holiday photos again. Will be more careful about converting to PSD if I'm going to "work " on them.
Going now to print a contact sheet with Photoshop. Thanks again. I had been putting one or two files on each CD which means I have lots of CD's mostly empty !!!!A great relief to know there is a way to get control of the CD jungle I am creating.
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  #13  
Old 01-18-2003, 08:52 AM
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Lampy Lampy is offline
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Hi again

I keep mine on the hard drive for a while especially the family pics because I'm always needing them. I have had a couple of CDs stop functioning properly and that's a bit concerning. Be sure to treat them well and from a preservation view keep them cool, dark and dry......the cool being most crucial! And keep them in their case!

I don't know how many people own DVD players and rent from Blockbuster or the like but it's amazing how many times we rent a movie and there is something wrong with the disc.... Just be nice to them!

Cheers!

--Heather
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  #14  
Old 10-12-2004, 03:49 AM
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gamo gamo is offline
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Pdf

Howcome not anyone says PDF. The pdf-format has the same advantages as the psd-format. But its got an extra little one, cos it might not get the same filesize as the psd. Adobe´s going the PDF way. Besides you can use your acrobat reader if you only wanna browse the old photos.

Ill defrently go for the PDF
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  #15  
Old 04-23-2005, 02:29 PM
ogee ogee is offline
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[QUOTE=

My criteria are simple and are the following:

1) No loss of image from compression (I don't care about file size)
2) A popular, non-proprietery, file format recognized by many programs (thus most likely to exist in the long run)

PSD fits #1 but not #2. Tif meets both. Jpeg meets #2 but not #1 and so on.

Just out of curiousity does a PSD file that was created on a really early edition of photoshop still come up in the latest version and vice versa?

That's just my thoughts!


--Heather[/QUOTE]
I agree that if you are archiving masters then you want to save it in a format that might be readable in 10 years. I also agree that TIFF might be one...what about BMP (Windows bitmap), it hasn't been mentioned by anyone?
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  #16  
Old 04-30-2005, 01:56 PM
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Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
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.tif is a later version of the older .tiff. it's a good format for saving. no losses and is used today by some programs and hardware. scanners will sometimes use .tif.

.bmp is another good format to use. no loss and generally a very good quality. current scanners and programs will often use this AND it has the added benefit of being portable to the web. not all formats can be used and displayed on the internet.

.jpg, .jpeg, are very common and widely used on the web because you can use compression, get a decent quality of the original, while saving file and therefore upload and download times. contrary to popular belief, .jpg does NOT always compress. it's optional and variable. if you save at a compression rate of 1 there is no compression. period. most paint programs, file converters and file viewers have a built in option for displaying at various compression rates or saving at various compression rates. paint shop pro and photoshop both can do this. i think the Gimp can also do this, but check it first.

.gif is a middle road quality versus speed format. you do give up a bit of quality for speed here, but mostly it's pretty good quality. it is also widely used on the internet.

i'd frankly recommend .bmp as your format. if you save in .tif and wish to use these later in posts on the net, you're going to have to convert them to a 'standard' file format like .jpg, bmp, or .gif....usually. some sites allow other formats, but those are the 3 standards.

.psp and .psd are paint shop pro and photoshop proprietary formats. they are both high quality formats and do NOT lose quality. .psd can be used in paint shop pro, but .psp cannot be loaded into photoshop (at least with the versions i've tried).

saving and resaving images over and over does not lose quality, unless the format is a compression format. this is digital, folks. files are saved EXACTLY as they were, number for number (except on rare occaisions where a copy error might occur). if you ever really wonder about this, simply compare the file size of the original to an EXACT copy. if the image has been altered, then yes, the file sizes may be different.

K.
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  #17  
Old 04-30-2005, 04:53 PM
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Caitlin Caitlin is offline
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One big benefit TIF has over BMP is that it can save layers.Though that probably isn't what you want to archive.
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  #18  
Old 04-30-2005, 09:48 PM
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Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
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thank you, caitlin,

i wasnt aware of that. that helps

K.
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  #19  
Old 05-01-2005, 12:13 AM
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Caitlin Caitlin is offline
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Actually, something I've been meaning to ask - what is the benefit of saving in psd, rather than tif. Are there layer types that TIF doesn't support? I have a lot of scans in TIF, and it has been easy to just open then up, do some retouching etc on a duplicate layer, with adjustment layers etc - leaving the original untouched scan on layer one. It seems more efficient to just then hit save than to resave as another file. Any down sides people know of?
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  #20  
Old 05-01-2005, 01:52 AM
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Gary Richardson Gary Richardson is offline
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With PSD, you save channels as well, therefore any channel masks you have created will also be saved. I don't think that this is the case with TIFF, but I may be wrong in this.
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