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History, Conservation, and Repair The history of photographic prints, and how best to care for and repair them.

daguerreotype repair

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  #21  
Old 09-05-2001, 08:04 PM
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Attached is the scanned daguerreotype (scanned with a 24 bit scanner). As you can see I need to get a another picture of her so I can repair the face. The rest is in reasonable shape and should not be that difficult to repair.

-T
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File Type: jpg dag.jpg (40.7 KB, 65 views)
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  #22  
Old 09-05-2001, 08:22 PM
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That's a crying shame! It looks on my monitor like there is just nothing at all left on a large part of her face. If you can't get another picture of her, it might be worth a shot to try Tom's suggestion, even if it is a very long shot. You've got nothing to lose except a piece of film and a little time. If you try it, let us know if you get anything out of it.

Ed
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  #23  
Old 09-05-2001, 08:25 PM
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Will do. I am hoping (desperately hoping) that another relative will have a good photo to work from.

-T
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  #24  
Old 09-05-2001, 10:33 PM
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Wow, sounds like forensic science here. It's probably the same things they do to solve some crime scenes. I never would have thought of that. Do you have to remove the picture from it's frame to do that do you think?

T- Let us know how it goes. I am dieing to hear how this turns out for you. You may be able to lead us in a situation we may one day come accross ourselves. It would be nice to know if we could work through this one.
DJ
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  #25  
Old 09-05-2001, 10:49 PM
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T. Paul, Frequently either UV light( try short and long wave variety) and/or infrared will reveal lots of interesting things which will be otherwise missed. There are other techniques for bringing out "hidden" images etc., but they vary from mildly to highly destructive and so, obviously should be avoided. Basically any non invasive technique might be worth a try. Also polarizing filters might possibly be used to some advantage. Good luck and keep us informed. Thanks, Tom
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  #26  
Old 12-10-2001, 08:06 PM
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T Paul,

I was just looking through some old posts, and I came across this one. Were you able to do anything at all with restoring the daguerreotype? Hey! I finally learned how to spel it!

Ed

Last edited by T Paul; 11-20-2007 at 06:43 PM.
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  #27  
Old 12-10-2001, 10:20 PM
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Ed,

The short version is no I haven’t.

The long version is that I had planned a trip to New York in Sept to visit with some family members and had hope to see if any of them had a picture of her at roughly the same time period and angle so that I could use it. If you remember from earlier posts, the original photograph had the face rubbed off accidentally. Well, with the horrible tragedy on the 11 of Sept my plans were canceled. I do hope to visit that way in the summer, so perhaps then I will have something to work with. It would mean so much to my mother if I could restore the photo.

-T
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  #28  
Old 12-11-2001, 06:43 AM
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That would be great. Good luck with it, and keep us informed if you do any good. Also don't forget Tom's suggestion. You *could* be pleasantly surprised.

Ed
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  #29  
Old 12-11-2001, 11:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Ed_L
T Paul,

I was just looking through some old posts, and I came across this one. Were you able to do anything at all with restoring the daguerreotype? Hey! I finally learned how to spel it!

Ed
As I'm new here - and still exploring the site - I've just checked this one myself. Interesting photo but I couldn't get a positive identification from the very dark scan and was wondering if it was really a Dag - (easy spelling method used by collectors and allowed by Daguerreian Society Members ) Is there a chance that it is an Ambrotype? ...and if so, it may be salvable.
(If it's a Dag it is on a polished metal plate not on glass.)

And an added note - for anyone interested in the "original" photos you might like to visit the Daguerrian Society website. Membership dues are reasonable and you'll find that the annual alone is worth far more than the membership price.

http://www.daguerre.org/opendag.html

Jim Conway
Timemark Photo Conservators

Last edited by T Paul; 11-20-2007 at 06:43 PM.
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  #30  
Old 01-05-2002, 06:10 PM
Sally Sally is offline
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Ambrotypes

When using a camera to copy a Daguerreotype it is necessary to “hide” the camera by placing a piece of black card over it with a hole cut for the lens. NEVER TAKE A DAGUERREOTYPE OUT OF THE FRAME.

Ambrotypes have only had a small mention in this thread. When framed they look similar to daguerreotypes and tintypes. I have only had one daguerreotype in my hands but it was quite mirror like in comparison to the others. The tintype, when scratched, is black or rusty (I don’t scratch them!!!!) the ambrotype is a glass negative very under exposed. You need to look at them on the appropriate angle. They can be printed like any other negative. Often they can be restored just by placing a new black card behind them.

All these photos are exposed in the camera, not a print made in the darkroom. Because of that they are all back to front. That means the men have their buttons on the wrong side.

Sally
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