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Hows my color?

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  #11  
Old 07-30-2005, 06:44 PM
inskip inskip is offline
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From what I can see in Eismann's book is that the fairest of baby skin is equal in Y & M w/ no C or K (0,15,15,0). But she doesn't necessarily fall into this category. It's been my observation that a young child like her should have equal amounts of M & Y w/ C being half (at most) or less.
I'm trying to learn how to go by the numbers because I don't trust my monitor or my own judgement yet. I tried to use the skin chart as a guide but not sure how-my numbers don't match up w/ those on the chart.

My image already looks much improved. But, I got stuck in the final stages. I was not able to see any cyan patches on her face??? Where am I supposed to see these? I was in color range. The fuzziness slider is grayed out as well. Did I miss a step???

I managed to get through the curves, but I'm never quite sure where to grab and drag on the curve line??? Thanks all...

I don't even know how to find a mid tone esp in a color image. Thanks for the tip Dave. I can see where that would be beneficial. But for some reason selecting that shadow appears more neutral and true to life. I may add warmth by toning it later on and/or convert it to B&W. I'm just trying to get a handle on this color correction business.
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  #12  
Old 07-31-2005, 12:11 AM
inskip inskip is offline
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When selecting a particular color, in this case red, with the Color Range tool are any edits only effecting the reds in the image even though curves adjustments were made in the green and blue channels as well? Unclear on how this works

I read that a child of this age would probably have equal amounts of Y & M in her skin, what about areas that are rosier than others like cheeks?? Or should I stay away from those areas when sampling?
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  #13  
Old 07-31-2005, 12:17 AM
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Duv Duv is offline
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OK. So here's Eismann. 0,20,2o,0. Well, ok, 1, 20, 20, 0. Based strictly on skin tone (no balancing of highlights or shadows) does this work? Only a question based on the book. Again, was the couch grey or biege? Different parts seem to have elements of both.
In closing, give 10 people who think they know how to color correct and you'll probably get 10 different renditions. Color correction by the numbers gets you into the ball park. After that, you're really on your own.

Cheers

Dave
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File Type: jpg D-MG_0701 copy.jpg (96.3 KB, 20 views)
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  #14  
Old 07-31-2005, 12:27 AM
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Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
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Quote:
Color correction by the numbers gets you into the ball park. After that, you're really on your own.
i think that's a very good way to look at it, duv.

btw, love what you did with that pic!

Craig
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  #15  
Old 07-31-2005, 12:58 AM
fat0n3s fat0n3s is offline
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I like what you did there Duv.

That is a good point with global color correction.

I am still learning about color correction, and alot of times I start out with the basics to get where I want with an image. I use the black and white eye droppers alot, and as you mentioned, that may not always be the best approach.
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  #16  
Old 07-31-2005, 09:26 AM
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Cameraken Cameraken is offline
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Well, I’m no expert and from what I’ve read I would say I’m at a similar level to inskip so I can’t contribute much here.

What I did want to do was thank fatOn3s for an excellent insight into how you tackled this picture

It seems that the setting of a black and white point in this picture has introduced a cast that has made the picture worse.

Is there any way to tell if a picture SHOULD HAVE a true black or white point?


Ken
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  #17  
Old 07-31-2005, 01:31 PM
inskip inskip is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cameraken
It seems that the setting of a black and white point in this picture has introduced a cast that has made the picture worse.
Ken
I actually think it worked in this case. fatOn3s rendition seems more true to the scene as it appeared when I took the photograph. BTW the chair IS beige and ivory.

Ken-The only way I know of to find the B & W points is w/ a Threshold Adj. layer by moving the slider all the way left or right and then slowly dragging it back will show the lightest/darkest points in the image. What I don't know, is how to find the mid-tone in a color image.

I just want to use the numbers as a guide because I don't trust my eye or my monitor yet. I tried to use the skin chart but my numbers didn't really match up-not sure how to use it.

I'm attaching part of a previous post because I 'm still curious about the answer.

When selecting a particular color, in this case red, with the Color Range tool are any edits only effecting the reds in the image even though curves adjustments were made in the green and blue channels as well? Unclear on how this works

I read that a child of this age would probably have equal amounts of Y & M in her skin, what about areas that are rosier than others like cheeks?? Or should I stay away from those areas when sampling?
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  #18  
Old 07-31-2005, 01:56 PM
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Cameraken Cameraken is offline
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The only way I know of to find the B & W points is w/ a Threshold Adj
Yes. This is the way I do it. But it still does not tell you if these points should be black and white.


Quote:
When selecting a particular color, in this case red, with the Color Range tool are any edits only effecting the reds in the image even though curves adjustments were made in the green and blue channels
What this means is that he has only selected the reds but once selected these areas can be changed any way you want. ie Adjust the green in the reds.


Quote:
what about areas that are rosier than others like cheeks
I would treat rosy cheeks like make-up and highlights and avoid them as
they are not the real skin tone.


I liked Duvs 'warm, cuddly feeling' although fatOn3s rendition may have been closer.

Ken
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  #19  
Old 07-31-2005, 02:43 PM
fat0n3s fat0n3s is offline
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If you have true black, white, and grey points in an image, you can color correct it almost perfect.

The problem is knowing if something is really black white or grey.

Looking at the couch, I figured it was a shade of grey, when judging the color of the overall picture. Turns out, I was wrong.

Alot of times, if colors in a picture are not true to life, it dosen't really matter, as long as memory colors are correct. Memory colors meaning colors that you know by memory.

If you have a picture with orange grass, and blue grapes, anyone who looks at that picture will know it's not true to life. I know that might be an extreme example, but the same thing holds true to skin color.

If you have a picture with a person's skin looking to blue or green, anyone will think that the color is wrong in the entire picture.

On the other hand, if you have the skin color correct, but the person's t-shirt is white when it's supposed to be a light blue, I don't think anyone will notice.

I assume pros can get the color of the entire picture true to life, but I'm not at that level yet.

If you take your own pictures, invest in a color chart. Having a color chart in the picture, will take all of the guessing out of what's black, white, and nutural.
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  #20  
Old 07-31-2005, 04:02 PM
inskip inskip is offline
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Not sure what the deal is w/ Color Range, but when I select cyan nothing show up in the selection mask preview except her eyes which I don't want to change. However, I can see that cyan is high in certain areas of her face??? This bothers me because in Eismann's book it says wherever the mask is black no correction will take place, well the whole mask is black. Also, it won't let me select the Color Range eyedroppers and the fuzziness slider is grayed out.

I really need to get the WB straightened out on my camera...

Last edited by inskip; 07-31-2005 at 04:11 PM.
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