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stubborn as a mule

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  #1  
Old 03-12-2006, 04:42 PM
HroadhogD1 HroadhogD1 is offline
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stubborn as a mule

A friend of mine at work would like me to do something with pictures of his late father, who passed away 20 years ago. He came from a very poor family, so there werent alot of photos of him. I was able to fix some of them, but this one seems important to him. I am a newbie, so if anyone can help me, please tell me how , so I can learn along with the others. Thank you.
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Old 03-12-2006, 05:06 PM
dafydscribe dafydscribe is offline
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Greetings.
First, convert to LAB colour, take out all the sepia.
Use your burn tool to darken the mid and light tones.
Use the measure tool to define the vertical then rotate arbitrarily.
Then the fun starts with rebuilding the missing bits.
Have fun !
Dafyd the Scribe, New Zealand
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Old 03-12-2006, 05:40 PM
HroadhogD1 HroadhogD1 is offline
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Well, that does make a big difference, but I guess I need a little more help.
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Old 03-12-2006, 06:49 PM
HroadhogD1 HroadhogD1 is offline
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The face is of course the main part that I really want clear. I can get just about all of the rest to look satisfactory.
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Old 03-12-2006, 08:28 PM
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byRo byRo is offline
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Dafyd, welcome to RetouchPRO

Quote:
Originally Posted by dafydscribe
First, convert to LAB colour, take out all the sepia.
I would agree, in general, that converting to LAB will usually give a good greyscale image. But (you knew there was a "but" coming) in the case of restoration this doesn't always apply, and the Channel Mixer (set to Monochrome) is usually a preferred tool.

We are looking to eek out of the image every possible bit of information. As these images were greyscale from the start, no channel starts out better than the other. As the years pass some channels will suffer more degradation than others.

Which all means that the fixed R,G,B proportions of LAB luminosity will probalby not be optimum. In this particular case, the Red channel is pretty useless whilst the Green and Blue are better. The LAB mix is, roughly, 60% Green / 30% Red and 10% Blue. Here a mix of 50% Green and 50% Blue will contain more information.

Hope this helped. Look forward to hearing more from you.

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Old 03-12-2006, 10:08 PM
HroadhogD1 HroadhogD1 is offline
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Well, I can get a picture of a head thast resembles a pencil sketch, but I was looking for more than that. How much should I expect to get from a photo that is damaged this bad? Anybody out there willing to give it a try?
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Old 03-12-2006, 11:53 PM
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Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
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the problem here is a bit different than what i thought it would be. i thought it was going to be about luminosity, but it's actually about the scanning or something done to the image after it was scanned. it's what i call 'sharpening blocks'. if you look at the image i posted, which is blown up quite a bit, it's blocky. his head is a series of blocks; the whole image is. you get this with some sharpening tools. i think some may call it jpeg artifacts also, but that's not what i think of it as.

anyways, if you can re-scan it and turn off any filters or sharpening stuff done in the scan process and just get a raw scan, that would be better. also, scan it at the highest possible resolution. if you have to, take it to a shop with a professional scanner that can do very high resolution scans.

you might also check with your friend if he was the one that did the original scanning and see what he did or if he can change the settings or resolution. there is an image there. it can be improved, but how much is going to depend on how good a scan you can get to begin with.
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Old 03-13-2006, 01:28 AM
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bart_hickman bart_hickman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kraellin
...his head is a series of blocks; the whole image is. you get this with some sharpening tools. i think some may call it jpeg artifacts also, but that's not what i think of it as....
.
Looks like jpeg artifacts to me. Jpeg optimally approximates an image using a set of scaled functions. The size of the set of functions is determined by the quality level. The optimal scaling is determined for every 8x8 chunk of the image. So when you see 8x8 blocks, you know it's jpeg artifacts. Of course sharpening routines will accentuate the boundaries between 8x8 blocks because there is a small discontinuity there. Even if you see some other block size, it might mean a jpeg image was rescaled and then recompressed.

However, we are dealing with an image that has very little information and to make it look right, that information will have to be greatly amplified (whether by sharpening or a very steep curve adjustment won't matter). So you want to eliminate all noise sources. Therefore, to have any hope, you need to save your image in TIFF or a high quality setting with JPEG2000 AND you need to scan it at the highest reasonable resolution. Possibly even consider using 48-bit pixel depth.

It looks like there is texture in the print, so you need to do a second scan with the image rotated 180 degrees. You will combine the two scans by rotating one of them 180 degrees and setting the opacity to 50%.

Bart
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Old 03-13-2006, 01:59 AM
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Gary Richardson Gary Richardson is offline
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As everyone so far has already said, the scan is pretty blocky and there's no real detail to work with.

This is about as good as I could get working with the posted image. (Bit of tidying up needed, but I'm a bit strapped for time at the moment).
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  #10  
Old 03-13-2006, 05:13 AM
HroadhogD1 HroadhogD1 is offline
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Ok, thanks alot everyone. I will try to rescan this picture. I did get a new scanner, I will try the one I bought, and if that doesnt work, I will try something else. Thank you for trying, and thanks for the information.
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