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Scanning Heritage Photos

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  #21  
Old 01-07-2005, 05:12 PM
Mike Mike is offline
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Location: Grand Junction CO USA
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Beth

Glad you are one of those practical minded farm people like me. I have used that description of the lights with others and just left them in the dust

The filter material is a kind of plastic sheet. One can cut it with scissors or a paper cutter. It will melt if it gets too hot, so do not let it touch a lite bulb!
When I used the brooder lights, I took some wire (as in hay baling) wrapped it around the light, with some extra bent down to hold the filter which was secured to the wire with (ready for this?) wood clothespins. Nothing but the latest, best designed, professional gear is used here in my studio

Mike (and now you know how cheap I am! or is it broke?)
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  #22  
Old 01-07-2005, 06:15 PM
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Beth McNabb Beth McNabb is offline
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Cool Had to call home!

Mike,
I had to call home and tell my folks a new use for baling wire we had never tried!!! Farmers are some of the most intelligent of people. If they paid someone to fix everything that broke, they would never turn a profit. Hence, necessity is the mother of invention. I admire anyone who can figure out how to do something with what they have without having to make a trip to town to buy a new tool or ... Don't get me wrong, I LOVE tools.

I'll let you know how everything goes.

Beth

P.S. I do need to make a trip to town for brooder lights and baling wire. I already have wooden clothes pens!

Have you ever bought the filter sheets from a company I could try online? I'll search, but maybe someone can give me some ideas. Thanks again.
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  #23  
Old 01-08-2005, 09:46 AM
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Ed_L Ed_L is offline
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Location: northwest Indiana, about 45 minutes from Chicago, IL
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About Lighting

For those of you who might be struggling with lighting concepts, I have a suggestion. Try your local library to see if you can find photographic lighting books by Dean Collins. They will not be dedicated to copy work, but once you understand the concept, you can use it for any situation. I bought a couple of videos of his techniques, probably in the 1980s. This guy is a master of lighting, and he explains things very clearly. If you are like a lot of people, you can improvise to make use of his information without putting out a lot of money. You will almost surely be able to get library books on photographic copying techniques by other authors, and they will likely have plenty of pictures to help you understand the copy setups. Good luck. One thing I should note is that I don't think he mentions baling wire.

Ed
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  #24  
Old 01-08-2005, 06:39 PM
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Beth McNabb Beth McNabb is offline
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incandescent bulbs

Mike,

Do you have a favorite brand/wattage of bulb you use?

Thanks,
Beth

P.S. The brooder lamps were only $8 a piece!
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  #25  
Old 01-09-2005, 01:32 PM
Mike Mike is offline
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For black and white copying, one can use just about any brand, but I like to stick to a 200 watt or so because I want the output, but there color temperature is unknown. I really prefer to use photo flood bulbs because they will put out a known color temperture light. Then if I want to copy a color photo I can place the proper filter over the camera lens to correct the color of the light to daylight. The photo flood lights also are 250 or 500 watt bulbs, hot but lots of light!

I agree with Ed, get some books on lighting and they will explain this much better than I can do here. There are other authors besides Dean Collins, but while he is very good, I do not know if he gets down to the really basic's.

I think that is less for the brooder lights than I paid years ago!

Mike
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  #26  
Old 01-11-2005, 07:19 AM
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Beth McNabb Beth McNabb is offline
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filter to correct to daylight

1)Which filter(s) do you use to correct to daylight. I've been looking at the polar filter I need and I think I need a lens hood/filter adapter.

2) Is the method the same for copying color photos as BW?

3)I went to the library. They had a couple of books on lighting, but not very helpful. Can you recommend books/authors you think I can learn from. I am able to wade/work through the non beginner books. My library is good about getting books we don't have through interlibrary loans. I have been floored with the $$$$ books they will let me use from colleges etc.

4) Thanks again!

Beth
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  #27  
Old 01-11-2005, 04:09 PM
Mike Mike is offline
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Location: Grand Junction CO USA
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In my opinion (for whatever thats worth) the best book on copying is a Kodak pub called :Copying and duplicating in Black and White and Color". The one I have is coded "M-1"

It was written for film users, but it goes into all the considerations of setting up a copy stand, lighting, filters, polorization, etc. I think that by reading how they did this with film, you can get a good idea of what you have to do in PS to attain the same result.

It can get quite technical, but it gives you the data you need. I think you can still order one from Kodak. Check your library first, then if you wish add it to your personal collection. A quick google search turned up quite a number of referances to this volume.

Mike
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  #28  
Old 01-11-2005, 08:05 PM
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Beth McNabb Beth McNabb is offline
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thanks for the info

Mike,
Thank you. Aren't Google and Amazon great! I'm looking forward to my new journey. Hope I find a pot of gold along the way!

Beth
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