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Macro

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  #1  
Old 10-11-2004, 01:43 PM
widgetwilk widgetwilk is offline
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Macro

I have seen some people put photos on a site and said it was in 'Macro' a setting on the camera???
Can anyone explain what 'Macro' is,
I have a Sony DSC-P32, Adobe Elements 2.0, and Win98

Thanks Ann
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Old 10-11-2004, 04:54 PM
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Leah Leah is offline
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Technically speaking, a "macro" shot is where the image that is produced on the camera sensor (film or digital) is the same size as the thing that the image is of is in real life. So a small coin, say, might be 10-20 mm in diameter. A macro shot of that coin on a 35mm film camera would be one where, when you looked at the actual negative (or slide) produced from the film, the diameter of the coin is the same amount (10-20 mm). Of course, if the negative were then printed at, say, 6x4 inches, the image of the coin would be much bigger than in real life (between 1.7 and 3.42 inches).

Production of macro images generally involves focusing the image much closer than the camera is normally capable of doing. Therefore to take macro shots most cameras have either a specific macro mode or use a special macro lens.

You will also see "macro" used to refer to extreme close-up in general.
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Old 10-11-2004, 10:01 PM
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Jeff L Jeff L is offline
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Great description Leah!

You pretty much summed it up in a very tidy manner.
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Old 10-12-2004, 02:27 AM
widgetwilk widgetwilk is offline
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Thank you, well explained, cannot find anything like that on my camera, should I have??
Ann
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Old 10-12-2004, 02:38 AM
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Leah Leah is offline
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I've found descriptions of it on the web that say it has an "auto" macro mode, but I'm not sure how that works -- my guess would be that if you try to focus on something 10-50 cm away then it automatically uses macro mode while if you try to focus on something more than 50cm away it behaves normally. It doesn't appear to be technically a "true" macro as it seems to produce images around half life size, but then a lot of "macro" settings aren't technically macro these days.
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Old 10-12-2004, 03:01 AM
widgetwilk widgetwilk is offline
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Thanks will try later, do I then put them in my album for you to see if it is right, or can you load them up in a message?
Ann
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Old 10-12-2004, 08:24 AM
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Jeff L Jeff L is offline
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I have a macro setting on my digital camera and there is a definate difference with the DOF. The focus is clearer but the drop off in focus is very apparent if you don't set the aperture high enough.

A good rule of thumb is to have an aperture of at least f8 when shooting macros. Could just be me though....
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Old 10-12-2004, 09:01 AM
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Leah Leah is offline
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Basically, if you manage to focus on something around 10-20 cm away and the picture comes out OK then you have probably managed to engage the auto macro function (don't use flash though).
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Old 10-12-2004, 11:39 AM
Mike Mike is offline
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Depth of field is a function of both the f stop you choose (larger number = more DOF, ie minimum at say f2.8, maximum at f22), and the distance between the lens and the subject. The more distance there is the more DOF there is.

So if you get very close, as in doing the coin thing, then the selection of a proper f stop will be very apperant when looking for DOF. But if you are shooting say a senic view from a mountain top, then the distance will control the DOF and the f stop selection is nothing more than a tool for setting the proper exposure.

On most cameras using a macro setting also means you have to increase the exposure since the lens to sensor(film) distance is usually increased a great deal.

Mike
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