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Colorblind...is this a big problem for me?

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  #1  
Old 06-26-2006, 10:48 PM
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AdamZx3 AdamZx3 is offline
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Colorblind...is this a big problem for me?

I recently took an Ishihara online test and several others and found out I am officialy colorblind. From what I can tell I am red/green weak, though it never really seems to be a problem anymore. on one test I could read 80% on the red test and 90% on the green test (differant progresive shades) and even my non color blind mom couldn't see the 100% bars on my non profiled KDS moniter.

I am in the middle of majoring in graphics design. And I am wondering, do I have a larger challange ahead of me? I realize I can probably never do any pre press proofing and things of that nature, but will this be a big damper on becoming a graphics designer and or retoucher? as far as retouching I always seem to be fiddling with skintones, not sure if it my perfectionist side kicking in or trouble seeing red/yellow tones....though I have improved from a year or two ago.


Any info regarding colorblindness in the industry would be very helpfull and very much appriciated!!

p.s. I might not get back to this untill the 5th, I am traveling to a wedding down in alabama on wed. and am not sure about internet access....not sure what i'll do with my time lol !!
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Old 06-26-2006, 11:43 PM
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Doug Nelson Doug Nelson is offline
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It might be a barrier to getting hired, but shouldn't be much of a hindrance to you as an artist. Something like 10% of all males have some degree of color-blindness, so you're definitely not alone (most aren't aware of it, though, so you have an advantage there).

So it might keep you from working an hourly wage in a gray cube for some corporation, but is that really a bad thing? Develop your own style first, and you'll get hired for your work.
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Old 06-27-2006, 02:31 AM
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adamzx3 Both my sons are colour blind ( inhereited from me Females pass the link down mainly to there sons ) My eldest is classed as total colour blind (trouble with all colours) He works in the car industry in the body work department, and yes he has painted cars, paints are numbered so that cuts some of the problems down but he was known for matching the tones better than someone not colourblind He also always wanted to go into the army but thought they would not have him because of the colourblindness, when in fact they do ( not bomb disposal though ) it was his Asthma that caused the problem in the end ! ! !

I always told the boys it is a reason for having problems NOT a excuse ! ! ! !

And Boy you do not ask what's this colour in my house

Good luck with your future

Palms
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Old 06-27-2006, 06:27 AM
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AdamZx3 AdamZx3 is offline
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thanks guys,

do you know if they screen applicants for colorblindness before hiring? I think I would fair pretty well with a shade test (arranging the shade blocks in order) but the other tests are rough, all I see are dots, no numbers lol.

I also work in the autobody field for now, and have painted a few cars, and mixed up paint for far more, usually requiring looking at a shade book that shows slight varients of the paint color, though I am a newbie at that only been working for a year.
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Old 06-27-2006, 10:01 AM
recrisp recrisp is offline
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I think that being color blind 'could' present a problem, but then again, it might all have to do with where one works, and what one actually works on.
I have actually worked with several people in retouching that were partially color blind, and they did 'O.K.', not really spectacular, but they did fine.
Retouching's supposed to be done by numbers anyway, not a monitor, plus, you do have printers that will differ slightly from the numbers, and most
images are redone to death by either the customer, or just to get them closer before they're sent out to the customer.
Most people I worked with used both the numbers and the monitor, but, we were in no way ever to use 'just the monitor', but I know some that did.
I know you aren't wanting to get into that, but I figured I'd mention it anyway, but you'd probably be doing 'some' color correction along the way.

As far as design goes, that 'might be' a problem, but like I said, it all depends on what you do, and who you work for, some places are better/worse
than others, and so are some jobs that come in.
I have never heard anyone with color blindness say they had problems getting a job though, not that there were many, but design being what it is,
it can definitely have setbacks due to colors not matching the way certain customers see it, and they can be very picky sometimes.
I'm definitely not trying to scare you away from what you want though, I'd say that you'd probably be fine, if you're good, then that's the main thing,
if you're not, AND have color blindness, then that's an altogether different problem.
Creating and selling something to the customer is the main thing, and while you may not see what the costumer sees, or your boss, the way it usually
works is that they'll mark up the proof that was sent out.
Using that proof, it'll say something to the effect of, "- mag slightly", "contrast more", etc., they pretty much tell you what 'they see'.
If for instance it said, "- mag slightly", all you'd have to do is alter it to using readings in INFO, (Photoshop) 'cause really, that's the way it should be
done anyway. (There's more to it than that, but that's the usual way it can go)
I worked in five companies as a retoucher and a designer, they were all alike when it comes to color.
I have seen as little as one 'turn around' on proofs sent out, to as much as fifteen proofs, it mostly all comes down to where you work, what customer
it is, and the people above you that make decisions.
If you see blue, and they see blueish green, I kind'a doubt that'd blow your cover, we all see something for the most part that is slightly different.

I would keep on your present course, and maybe ask around people that you've met at class, or teachers, now'd be the time to get answers from
people who are are either teaching the course, or learning it as you are.
If you're good at what you do, besides color blindness, it'll show, and if you are, I wouldn't worry at all, I worked with many, many people that didn't
know what they were doing, (retouchers) and usually they came up from the ranks, and they'd been there so long, they just blended in.
Most of the designers I knew were all pretty good though, if you have creativity, it'll come out, you can't hide when you're a designer, but you can
always float through life if you're a retoucher.
(These are my personal thoughts in jobs I worked at, not all retouchers are this way, but, I thought it important to tell it like I saw)

Oh yeah, I have only had to take one test, and that was for retouching, and all it consisted of was a verbal one, and I was asked what I would do
to fix a certain image, I have known people that had to take tests, but usually you're either referred to that place from a friend, or you're known in
the field, so your reputation may precede you, good or bad.
I have definitely never heard of a color blindness test, although, somewhere, I'm sure someone has, but I don't think it's widespread.

Randy
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Old 06-27-2006, 03:43 PM
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Adam maybe you are running before you walk ? go to a opticians and have a test done by a "expert" who will tell you what colours you do have problems with, We thought my second son was red/green blind but his problem is with blues/purple. And i did see a report on tv a few years ago where there are corrctive glasses for colour blindness but i think that they were not available in the UK ( When i asked my eldest son if he would be interested in them at all he said "no"! with some quite valid reasons )
Like Randy says i havent really heard of people having to sit a test to see if they are colour blind for a job ( except for the armed forces etc ) because if you think about it they would do the test for driving (traffic lights ! ) And i do cover a few years as my father is colour blind as well,
As for as design etc Randy has obviously better experience than me. but another thought for you my eldest son was diagnosed at age 7 as i became suspicious when he drew a tree with brown leaves and green trunk and wanted a brown jumper to go to cubs ( should be green) so how many howlers in that department have you done ?

Palms
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Old 06-27-2006, 06:04 PM
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AdamZx3 AdamZx3 is offline
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Quote:
my eldest son was diagnosed at age 7 as i became suspicious when he drew a tree with brown leaves and green trunk and wanted a brown jumper to go to cubs ( should be green) so how many howlers in that department have you done ?
well i'm not sure what a howler is but I think you mean have I had similar experiances Occasonaly when I was in middle school I would glance at a color say maroon and think it was dark brown at first, then realize it was after someone said no thats maroon. it only happens once in a blue moon, and if I cant get a good look at the color (if it flashes by). but if I analyze the shade I havent had any problems, and in the years it seems to be getting better. I never get basic shades mixed up and have no problems descerning them such as

red, green, blue, orange, yellow,violet, fushcia, green etc..


I was playing around in photoshop and made these pics with each colors rgb value going from 255-254-253 and 255-253-251, the first set I have a terrible time seeing the differance, while on the second set,descending by 2 values each, I can see the differant shade blocks, and zoomed to 200% they clear up some more. bear in mind i'm using a 5yr old KDS 19"moniter that I picked up for around 120 bucks back then. Its also not profiled.

I never really thought I was partially colorblind before, only color retarded but after taking the test it made me rethink. but like you guys said i'm making an appointment with the eye doctor after I get back to see for sure, and i'll check up on the corrective glasses.

I posted the sample pics below, I would be curious to see if you guys can see the differant shades on the first pic.
ps I included the psd here but had 2 strip the text out to make the filesize limit, not sure if the 1st two pics would display correctly online.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3...mZX3/RGB_1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3...mZX3/RGB_2.jpg
Attached Images
File Type: psd RBG_set2.psd (75.4 KB, 9 views)

Last edited by AdamZx3; 06-27-2006 at 09:41 PM.
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Old 06-27-2006, 08:13 PM
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Adam, It is my guess that you degree of color blindness is not so much that it will hinder you in the graphic design field. You stated that you are in the middle of obtaining a graphic design degree. From what I remember, in the first year of classes for a graphic design degree, there were many art classes including color theory (I remember having to paint a color wheel with acrylic paints). If you have been passing these classes without the instructors constantly pointing out flaws you probably will not have much problem.

If this is what you want to do Adam, then by all means continue on. Your instructors and fellow students should be able to provide you with feedback and let you know if there is any real problem.

Good luck.
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Old 06-28-2006, 07:41 AM
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There are conceivably even advantages to being colorblind.
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Old 07-05-2006, 09:16 PM
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AdamZx3 AdamZx3 is offline
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intresting info guys!

One interesting note, I was reading my creative arts magazine on the way down to the wedding and I skimmed over the mini article and website in the back and they had a thumbnail of the test and I could clearly see the 45, and online I could see nothing, and could see some of the 56....however my mom could fire off all the numbers online without a problem... I made an appointment for aug when my yearly eye exam is due so I should know fairly soon!

i'm hoping I might be ever so slightly colorblind!

thanks again for the info

ps can I get some results from the pictures above? can anyone read the 1st set and how well can everyone see the 2nd set?
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