RetouchPRO

Go Back   RetouchPRO > Technique > Input/Output/Workflow
Register Blogs FAQ Site Nav Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Input/Output/Workflow Scanning, printing, color management, and discussing best practices for control and repeatability

Paper

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 01-08-2002, 09:42 PM
Sam's Avatar
Sam Sam is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Zimbabwe
Posts: 153
Tom - you really are a mine of information, aren't you?

When you say "improper display methods" what do you mean? The fading problems I've had are with photos that have been displayed in normal room conditions/temperatures, out of sunlight, etc.

Also, you say these pigment inks need a special printer - oh, oh, I suppose that rules me out. Do you know if you can get a normal printer altered in some way to accept the pigment inks?

Sorry to impose upon you again, but you do seem to know everything. (Flattery will get me everywhere, I hope!!!)


DJ - I'd seen that thread before and wondered about those guys Cippres was talking about. I'll do some more research on the Lyson inks and see what comes up.

Last edited by Sam; 01-08-2002 at 09:48 PM.
Reply With Quote top
  #12  
Old 01-08-2002, 10:14 PM
thomasgeorge's Avatar
thomasgeorge thomasgeorge is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 1,045
Sam, Three main factors to consider in display are to avoid UV light as much as possible..this means no direct sunlight and avoid flourescent lights as they are "rich" in UV component unless sheilded. The second relate to relative humidity and temperature. Basically the higher the temp and RH the shorter the life of the photo, regardless of whether the image is formed by silver or dyes/pigment. Ideally the RH should be no more than 50% and the temp in the 50-70 degree range...not very practical in the real world unless you live in a climate controlled vault. Third, displaying the photo/print unprotected...they should be matted and framed under glass. By doing this you can offset some of the problems of humidity and to a lesser degree RH as well. The main problem with prints fading has been the search for the "magic" ink/paper combination, something similar to what silver based and early color photography went through. Currently, the dye based inks Epson markets and their line of paper( the Heavyweight Matte) give good results even under adverse RH and temp and UV conditions as do some of the other manufacturers products, but Epson seems to be pretty near the top of the heap. Unfortunatly, there is no way currently to successfully retrofit a dye based printer with the print head necessary to accomodate the pigment based inks, The physical make up of the inks themselves seem to preclude that and of the printers avaliable which use the pigment Archival inks, only the Epson 2000 is anywhere near affordable...you also must use special paper with the pigment based inks and that paper is not interchangable with papers designed for the dye based inks. Of all the papers Epson puts out, the most resistant to fading under accelerated "torture test" conditions is the heavyweight matte...all the others, with the possible exception of their new glossy colorfast paper dont resist fading well at all, and from what I have read there are very few other offerings from the desktop printing arena which do any better...quite a few show severe fading after only a few months...If you can aquire some, it would probably be worth considering obtaining a package of the Heavyweight Matte and whatever ink you can and experimenting...I cant stress enough though, the importiance of frame and mat under glass for display and avoiding direct sunlight or flourescient light. Hope this is of some help...Tom

Last edited by thomasgeorge; 01-08-2002 at 10:29 PM.
Reply With Quote top
  #13  
Old 01-08-2002, 11:06 PM
DJ Dubovsky's Avatar
DJ Dubovsky DJ Dubovsky is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Upper Penninsula of Michigan
Posts: 1,659
Sam
Next time you decide to take a vacation somewhere, I would say plan to buy alot of computer supplies while you're there and bring them back with you. Or mail them to yourself. Too bad your place of residence makes getting good supplies so difficult.
DJ
Reply With Quote top
  #14  
Old 01-09-2002, 12:15 AM
Sam's Avatar
Sam Sam is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Zimbabwe
Posts: 153
Good heavens, Tom, was that a comprehensive answer or what???

Huge thanks for that.

I think one of the things I've only just come to appreciate is the importance of displaying behind glass. The one photo of my daughter that faded badly after less than a year was just in a card mount, not a glassed frame.

But I do wonder why glass should make such a difference?

DJ - that's what every Zimbo does - stockpiles on each trip to S.A. In fact my hubby is there right now and he has an ENORMOUS shopping list of mostly computer stuff to get, given him by me! Poor man, he'll be hours filling out all the customs forms at the border. But then if he will go gallivanting, he must pay the price!!!
Reply With Quote top
  #15  
Old 01-09-2002, 07:12 AM
thomasgeorge's Avatar
thomasgeorge thomasgeorge is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 1,045
When mat/frame/glass combination is used for display, you have the following advantages:
(1) The glass, even if not specially formulated or treated to block UV light, does block a certain amount of it.
(2) the Glass/mat/frame combination acts like a barrier to air born contaminants (spores,dust etc.), sudden changes in RH and to a lesser degree, Temperature. While not air-tight (unless special mounting/framing/materials are used, it is still a huge improvement over display of unprotected photos/prints
(3) Provides a rigid mount for the photo/print to prevent curling/cockling and the associated problems of the paper becoming creased or cracked.
I guess the bottom line is: "frame 'em then hang 'em". Tom
Reply With Quote top
  #16  
Old 02-07-2002, 02:52 PM
greg greg is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 18
So would you suggest that for phto prints I should stop using photo paper and just use heavyweight matte from epson?
Reply With Quote top
  #17  
Old 02-08-2002, 07:48 AM
thomasgeorge's Avatar
thomasgeorge thomasgeorge is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 1,045
Greg, At present the Matte paper, when used with standard inkjet dye type inks, gives the longest print life and is also less expensive than the glossy photo papers. The new Colorlife paper from Epson is suppost to have good "staying power" but I have not read very much about its actual performance. Tom
Reply With Quote top
  #18  
Old 02-18-2002, 12:35 AM
Sharon Brunson's Avatar
Sharon Brunson Sharon Brunson is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 137
I ordered the MIS VM hextone black and white inks and tomorrow I'm ordering Hahnemuhle Photo Rag 308 paper. I'm wondering who else is using something like this? I like the Epson HWM put wanted to try something else.

I joined the Epson-Leben list and the Digital BW lists mainly to learn about different papers and inks but there aren't many people on those lists talking about restoring photographs.

I'll let you know how this combo works when I get it. If some of you try something different let me know.

By the way, is anyone using Epson Watercolor?

Please forgive me if you have already hashed these things out.

Sharon
Reply With Quote top
  #19  
Old 02-18-2002, 02:51 AM
BigAl's Avatar
BigAl BigAl is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: South Africa
Posts: 497
Tom is right in that you must get your prints behind some kind of protective layer as soon as the inks are dry. As I said on another thread, I use NuJet inks with Epson Glossy/Photo Papers (not archival papers), and some of my prints look as good as the day they were printed, nearly 5 years down the road. These prints are all behind glass hanging on walls. I once had a test print (Epson inks on Glossy paper) on my window sill (bright light but no direct sunlight), and after a month the reds had almost disappeared, and after 6 months you could hardly make out the image. I also made a bunch of prints on 4x6 paper to test the printer as well as scanning resolution and dumped these in a shoe box. These also still look good after 5 years.

On another thread someone was querying a cold press laminator. I'd really like to know how long the colors would last with the standard papers using a laminate to seal the print. The only thing I'd be worried about here, is if there's a reaction between the plasticiser in the laminate and the ink/paper combination.

Has anyone tried using archival papers with the pre-870/1270 printers and inks?

BTW Sam, I'm really battling to get Epson papers at a reasonable price at the moment.
Reply With Quote top
Reply

  RetouchPRO > Technique > Input/Output/Workflow


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Matte Paper or Printer problem?? Maryarena Input/Output/Workflow 5 12-17-2004 07:03 AM
Vellum Paper T Paul Image Help 2 07-26-2004 12:59 AM
canon i950 & photo paper pro paper stevic Hardware 0 05-29-2003 09:42 PM
Inkjets and Home Made Paper: What do you think? jeaniesa Input/Output/Workflow 7 06-28-2002 09:05 AM
[Definition] RC Paper Doug Nelson Input/Output/Workflow 3 02-05-2002 11:34 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:09 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright © 2016 Doug Nelson. All Rights Reserved