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D65 or native white on standard macbook (white)

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  #1  
Old 08-14-2011, 06:29 AM
bart1986 bart1986 is offline
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D65 or native white on standard macbook (white)

What color temperature do you recommend me to use on my macbook (white standard one) i am calibrating my screen with my I1display2 and ColorEyes software.

Right now i have it at 100cdm and Native whites, but everywhere i read people saying D65 is what you should set it to, but this is very warm, in my opinion it is too warm *my whites turn reddish* but well.. if it is better, i guess i should get used to it?

So what do you recommend? D65 or Native White??

PS. I do know the macbook is not exactly the best monitor to use for this kind of work!

Thanks!
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Old 08-14-2011, 06:58 AM
girlsfather girlsfather is offline
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Re: D65 or native white on standard macbook (white

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Originally Posted by bart1986 View Post
What color temperature do you recommend me to use on my macbook (white standard one) i am calibrating my screen with my I1display2 and ColorEyes software.

Right now i have it at 100cdm and Native whites, but everywhere i read people saying D65 is what you should set it to, but this is very warm, in my opinion it is too warm *my whites turn reddish* but well.. if it is better, i guess i should get used to it?

So what do you recommend? D65 or Native White??

PS. I do know the macbook is not exactly the best monitor to use for this kind of work!

Thanks!
The color temperature depends under what general light you work.
Lets say if you do restoration or prepress you are likely to compare a printed sample/original to your screen. In this case the colourtemperature of the lightning should match the calibrations colortemperature.

I calibrate my external screen to 5000 Kelvin.
(As I remember, quatographic suggests 5000-5500 Kelvin for photographic work. 6500 is for prepress where the ambient light is 6500 Kelvin.)
I calibrate my macbook pro to the same 5000 Kelvin, gamma 1.8
I have different profiles for location: one brighter when on outdoor location and one with 120cd.
(When shooting and looking at RAWs colour accuracy is not as important as general composing and exposure/sharpnes. Color accuracy is needed later.)

Even though the Macbooks screen is not the best screen, I would like to get a similar look as on my workstation.
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Old 08-14-2011, 07:14 AM
bart1986 bart1986 is offline
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Re: D65 or native white on standard macbook (white

Thanks! So does it make sense to leave it on native white for general editing and photography that will only be used on the web, then when i work for print-output i just change the settings to D65 so i know what it will look like on print?

I'm afraid my images will turn out to warm when people would watch it on a non-calibrated screen when using D65 for web-output..
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Old 08-14-2011, 07:27 AM
girlsfather girlsfather is offline
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Re: D65 or native white on standard macbook (white

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Originally Posted by bart1986 View Post
Thanks! So does it make sense to leave it on native white for general editing and photography that will only be used on the web, then when i work for print-output i just change the settings to D65 so i know what it will look like on print?

I'm afraid my images will turn out to warm when people would watch it on a non-calibrated screen when using D65 for web-output..
I do not understand what you mean with general white.
If that means not calibrated - no that is not a good idea.
And D65 is a quite unnatural colortemperature - unless used in an 6500 Kelvin working illumination, used in printhouses. In Photography studios you have prooflights that have special flourescent light with 5000 to 5500 Kelvin.

If you do not have a specific prooflight setting, I personally would go for 5000 to 5500 Kelvin.
A testchart for display would help to get the feeling, what setting is more neutral to your eye.
Again - if there is no sample (print or lets say phisical original of a product you retouch) to match, you are a bit more free, and I would look, at which colour temperature a neutral greyscale would look neutral to your eyes.
Then you start calibration using that colortemperature.
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Old 08-14-2011, 07:47 AM
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John Wheeler John Wheeler is offline
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Re: D65 or native white on standard macbook (white

Hi Bart1986

I will toss in my opinion as well.

I calibrate to match the viewing conditions.

For prints, calibrate for where will your prints be viewed. In the past, many homes were purely incandescence based and 5000K or D50/D55 may be a good choice. In today's home, there are many choices of lighting with CFL and LED and variations of lighting all the way from warm to bluish. Getting a good tone and color match is based on trying to match both the white point and brightness of those viewing conditions.

For prints, that depends on who is customer and what is their viewing conditions

For the web is another matter.
- Most viewers do not have a color calibrated monitor and often cranked up quite bright.
- The software of many browser/OS pairs are not color managed to begin with.
- That is one of the reasons standard practice is to output to sRGB color space as the least common denominator when outputting to web given the typically uncontrolled viewing environment.
- If all you are concerned about is your own web viewing, then again set your calibration for your viewing conditions. If you view with native white, then calibrate with native white. If you view with D65, then calibrate for D65.

That is all IMHO of course.

Now, I do have a MacBook Pro and do have to say something about their screens. I like a good match yet there are issues that make fine tuning the calibration not too useful.

- The screens dark point (the darkest it can display) is not too good compared to most standalone monitors
- The color gamut is a lot more limited than you might imagine
- I too have experienced trying to get a good white point and have been frustrated
- I really don't like that I cannot lock down the brightness control in System Perferences
- Be sure to turn off the auto adjust with ambient light
- And the worst part with most notebook screens (not limited to Macs) is that their vertical viewing angle is quite limited. If you tilt you display some or changed your vertical viewing angle, the color shifts way way more than the fine tuning you are trying to achieve (just try it as a test on some color test charts on the screen).

All that said, I try to do the same as you and get it as good as I can, just be aware of the limitations. Good luck

Last edited by John Wheeler; 08-14-2011 at 08:01 AM.
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Old 08-14-2011, 01:13 PM
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andrewrodney andrewrodney is offline
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Re: D65 or native white on standard macbook (white

As correctly mentioned, the correct white point value is the one that produces a visual match to the viewing conditions next to the display.

Couple points:
D65 isn't 6500K nor is D50, 5000K etc. An illuminant defined as a standard illuminant (D for Daylight) is an exact description of a color. Any Kelvin number is a range of colors, quite a lot of different colors.

You can ask differing software products to provide any of these colors, even with the same instrument and get different results. The only true source capable of producing D65 is 93 million miles from the location of your display! And D65 was an average of measurements made in differing locations.

Native White Point is useful for low end displays like the laptop because the only way to alter the WP is through a lookup table in the graphic system which can introduce banding on the display. However, if the native WP doesn't produce a decent match of the print being viewed, you're better off living with some banding and getting the match. Start with a native WP, maybe it will match.

A viewing booth may be 'rated' as D65 of D50 or "daylight" whatever. Again, that's not necessary true (certainly for a fluorescent bulb), its quite likely that the values you set for calibration to produce a match are nothing close to what the viewing booth is 'rated' for.

All the numbers for setting a calibration target are meaningless! The right values are the ones that produce a match!
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