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Input/Output/Workflow Scanning, printing, color management, and discussing best practices for control and repeatability

Getting Good Prints From Dig Files

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  #11  
Old 11-15-2002, 10:52 AM
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Sharon Sharon is offline
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Question for Jakaleena

I was at the Beach several days ago and was able to get a really good shot of a seagull. I usually do my own printing but I like the photo lab’s paper better then inkjet. Their paper is shiner.

I tried one online photo service. The colors were good, but they zoom and crop. So important detail was lost at the right and left side of the photo. I could have them redo it and not crop and zoom, but then the actual photo wouldn’t be an 8x10. Apparently they use 8x10 paper.

Does Wal-Mart use larger paper so the finished product will be an actual by 8x10? I have a 5MP digital camera. Do you have any suggestions on how I should size the photo before I take it in. Also, does Wal-Mart accept a CD or do I have to leave my compact flash card? I'll be using the Lynnwood, WA Wal-Mart.

I’ve attached a copy of the photo I am so proud of.

Thanks so much for any help you can give me.

Sharon
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File Type: jpg seagull.jpg (44.9 KB, 98 views)
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  #12  
Old 11-15-2002, 06:32 PM
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Jakaleena Jakaleena is offline
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I downloaded your image. The problem isn't with the printing, it's with the aspect ratio. Your image is not proportional to an 8x10 print.

I resized the image without resampling, and what you have is a 6.656x10 image which can't be printed to an 8x10 size without cutting off the ends. When I reset the height to 8 inches, the width went to 12.02 inches (equivalent to a 35mm full frame negative).

In order to get an 8x10 print from it without cutting off any of the seagull, you'd have to add to the 6.656 height until it was 8 inches so that your image size aspect ratio was equal to 8x10. Or, you can ask for an 8x12 print and you should get the whole seagull.

If they can print from a CF card, they should be able to print from a CD. Wal-Marts that can handle one type of digital media should be able to print from any other type of digital media.

Last edited by Jakaleena; 11-15-2002 at 06:38 PM.
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  #13  
Old 11-15-2002, 06:47 PM
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Jakaleena Jakaleena is offline
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Oh, I almost forgot. I print a lot of images that don't have the correct aspect ratio for the print I want to make from them. What I usually do is change the canvas size so that it's proportional to the print I want.

For yours (attached) I just changed the image size so that the width was 10 inches (without resampling). Then, I changed the canvas height to 8 inches. If you do that though, don't make your canvas white since the printer can't "see" white and will ignore it, making the same problem you had before where the seagull was cut off on the ends. I usually use black. Then what I do is trim the black edges off of the print after it's made. This will all cause it not to fit into a standard size frame, so you'll probably have to have a matt cut for it with the correct size opening.

Let me know if this helps you out....
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  #14  
Old 11-15-2002, 07:19 PM
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Sharon Sharon is offline
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Hi Jakaleena,

Thanks so much for your detailed information. You’ve just saved me from making the same mistake a 2nd time. I’ll resize according to your instructions and make my canvas black.

I didn’t know I could have the photo printed as an 8x12. I think I’ll have one done as 8x10 and one as 8x12.

That seagull was good enough to pose for me so he deserves to be placed in a proper frame.

Sharon
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  #15  
Old 09-02-2003, 01:54 AM
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Dirtdarte Dirtdarte is offline
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The key to achieving accurate color is to have a color managed workflow.

If you don't have a calibrated monitor, you are simply working in the dark. Adobe gamma is a very, very poor subsitute for a properly calibrated monitor. The problem is when you "calabrate" your monitor using the "eyeball" meathod, you are doing nothing more than giving it you best guess.

Profiling software is available but it can be expensive. A spyder is a necessary if you are trying to achieve accurate color.

A few ideas that might be helpful is to set up you monitor out of direct light. Keep the light consistant.

An expensive monitor with "profiles" is nice but I have found that even a inexpensive monitor that is properly calibrated will perform better than a monitor with a canned profile.

If you have no way to profile your printer then its "by guess and by golly" all the way. Some printer profiles are available but be wary. Your monitor profile, color space and printer profile are linked. If one isn't accurate, you may be chasing a tiger by the tail.
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  #16  
Old 01-23-2004, 07:01 PM
john_opitz john_opitz is offline
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A calibrated monitor is a start. Either way you do that (adobe gamma or calibrating device), you still should use the info pallet to check highlight,midtones and shadows. This is because your eyes adapt to the viewing screen.
When using inkjets, you have to find out what the gamut of the printer is. Most are sRGB. Using the sRGB color space is a good choice for this. Some can be wide gamut printers. The industry itself (some printer,camera, scanner companies) is moving in this direction for labeling their color output. Whether this is the correct tagging they do is well debated, past and present. Either way you can use another profile for screen appearence for that file if you wanted to.
Assigning a proflie does not change the file numbers(leaves the file untouched), just the color appearence on screen. Its when you convert the image that the numbers change(altering the file). It takes on the screen appearence(color) of the assign profile. I feel this is where a lot of users are having problems with this and also how they have their color management set.

Converting (in color management terms), there is no color change going on. The whole purpose of color management is consistent color from device to device. Now, this is a deep topic. What is happening are other things, gamut limitations of the device, how a device handles out of gamut colors (rendering intents). Its picking something close of what that device can print.

Profiles (for output) just shows how that device is going to print colors, what colors it can and cannot print.

While you can't "calibrate" some inkjets. You can adjust the media settings for the software for that inkjet....The settings are (depends on the inkjet) Best......Normal.....Econo....This controls the amount of ink hitting the paper......Then you you pick your paper type. This varies........Glossie,Matte,Photo,inkjet. Its a good idea to use paper(the company who made the inkjet) made for that printer. But you can use third party paper. Most of the time if you do use third party paper. You will want to have a custom profile made for it. Otherwise, its more of a trial and error for the testing.

Here is a link to using profiles for color correction

http://ep.pennnet.com/Articles/Artic...Dan%20Margulis


You will need to register.



Also their is a book out called "Real World Color Management" about color management as well.

Here's their website.


http://www.colorremedies.com/realworldcolor/


This is an article for printing to inkjets.

http://www.colorremedies.com/article...psheet.pdf.zip


A sample chapter from "Photoshop Restoration And Retouching"

http://www.digitalretouch.org

http://www.digitalretouch.org/2editi...lorcorrect.pdf


In this chapter, She explains using "false profiles"


John

Last edited by john_opitz; 01-25-2004 at 08:11 PM.
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  #17  
Old 11-24-2004, 12:35 AM
john_opitz john_opitz is offline
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Printer Test Strip

Here is a handy test strip for testing how you inkjet will output your prints.


Printer test strip


zip file for test strip:

Printer Test Strip
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  #18  
Old 11-24-2004, 12:47 AM
john_opitz john_opitz is offline
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RGB target

http://www.colorremedies.com/realwor...GBramp.tif.zip
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  #19  
Old 11-24-2004, 12:47 AM
john_opitz john_opitz is offline
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RGB target

http://www.colorremedies.com/realwor...GBramp.tif.zip
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