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Input/Output/Workflow Scanning, printing, color management, and discussing best practices for control and repeatability

color output

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  #1  
Old 11-04-2001, 08:09 AM
pglynn pglynn is offline
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color output

could you help with this problem when i restored an old photograph recently skin color tone looked good on the monitor but when i printed it out the skin color was a light greenish color
i have attached the file i restored as you can see the color tone are ok on the screen the color tone come different.







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File Type: jpg gran&-grandad-copy.jpg (96.8 KB, 38 views)
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  #2  
Old 11-04-2001, 10:08 AM
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thomasgeorge thomasgeorge is offline
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Looks like my first reply disappeared into a pothole on the digital highway--I'll try again-- What make of printer are you using and is the discoloration visible in all types of light or just in certain types, like incandescent? Some inks and paper combinations display a phenomenon known as metamerism which is evident as a greenish cast when the print is viewed in certain lighting conditions. I believe there is a thread buried somewhere around here that gives a link to a site which suggests some corrective measures. If you monitor is color balanced and your printer usually outputs good images, try decreasing the green channel in hue/sat function--I'm not too hot with color though. hope this helps a little. Tom
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Old 11-04-2001, 02:54 PM
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Richard_Lynch Richard_Lynch is offline
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While there are a number of things that might be going wrong, my first instinct was that there was a calibration problem -- either with the monitor or the printer. If you have not calibrated your monitor, you should do so -- though I don't think this is the problem in this case. I downloaded the image and checked the colors with the eyedropper, and while there were some areas of the image that were greenish (mostly in the dress) the skin tones did not seem overtly 'green.' I did some basic color corrections and didn't come out with any huge shifts that would suggest this image was totally off...

I am wondering specifically what type of paper you are using, as well as the printer type. If you are trying to print, for example, using a photo-quality printer and you are using a standard printer paper, your prints can certainly shift in an unwanted direction. I have noticed in my own practice that trying to do this yeilds accentuated blues -- which can certainly shift green considering yellow content in the rest of the image.

The last post asks if other images also print with a shift, and that is important. While you can calibrate your system and apply corrections and adjustments that counter a problem, it is best to reduce the effect of the problem -- this being much akin to treating the disease rather than the symptom. If you don't treat the disease in this case, you may end up in a situation where your screen result will print very well to *your* printer, but will fail everywhere else. If you only print to your printer, it may not matter. Another factor which could insinuate itself here is how you manage color...which is something that is relatively easy to have problems with.

You haven't started with anything easy here...Fill us in, I'm sure we can do more to help.
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Old 11-05-2001, 07:08 PM
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thomasgeorge thomasgeorge is offline
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Richard, have you encountered any types of photo paper which seem to exibit color shift problems more than others, other than the ill-fated Epson super red shift glossy premium one which was pulled from the market? I am wondering if perhaps some of the problem is related to paper type--i.e., glossy vs. matte vs "photo quality". Tom
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Old 11-05-2001, 08:39 PM
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Richard_Lynch Richard_Lynch is offline
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Tom,

If you get right to it, all papers are going to perform a little differently. When I go to press, I have settings that I use to do screen proofs depending on the paper. If you are going to a high-quality, finished, heavy paper, you will *probably* encounter less deviance in image quality in print (special papers may yield other results). I don't have a specific brand that I use right now (between printers), and often find in my experience that the manufacturer is not lying when it comes to paper suggestions. That is to say, they probably calibrate with a specific paper in mind -- they want you to get good results from the product, and you'll have to use something similar to get the best results -- at least without other adjustments. I've gotten good results with different photo-quality papers -- though they are certainly all not the same...The type of ink and application will be cause for variations as well. If you want to get particular, altitude and humidity...

My suggestion is, find out what the manufacturer recommends (it will often be one of their own most-expensive products) and then see if there are similar cheaper alternatives that you can try. When you find one that works ('works' in this case means simulates the results of the recommended paper with reasonable accuracy), stick with it. But I guess the point was that you can't assume that papers will work the same way. Using one type will usually make your prints reasonably predictable. Huge adjustments to get the right results, on the other hand, will usually suggest to me that there is something wrong, and while it might be interesting to do for a special effect, it probably should not be standard practice. If everything is calibrated (and clean -- like the nozzles), then I would suspect the paper. It can certainly cause sinister shifts.
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Old 11-06-2001, 06:46 AM
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thomasgeorge thomasgeorge is offline
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Richard, Thanks for the input. In my limited experience I have noted that different papers, even from the same mfg. tend to give subtle and sometimes not so subtle differences using the same settings, which is why I now use Heavy weight Matte for almost everything. On the few occasions I have sent work out using the same settings/profile, it comes back vey nice indeed--at least the customers have all been happy. Tom
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