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Photo Restoration Classes

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  #11  
Old 06-04-2002, 05:40 AM
Vikki Vikki is offline
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Greg - I think Jak is right about skipping the photo history/process part. Only my opinion, but I don't think it would interest people who were only interested in learning how to restore with their computer. Nor do I think it's necessary either, and would probably be too long of a course anyway.
I've met loads of people that want to just play around with photos, and would take a simple class, but are not really interested in the whole package.

As I right this, I'm wondering how much interest there is for specifically photo restoration, vs general photo manipulation.
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  #12  
Old 06-04-2002, 05:49 AM
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Doug Nelson Doug Nelson is offline
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Just a suggestion, but perhaps you could collaborate on a syllabus?
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  #13  
Old 06-04-2002, 06:01 AM
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Hydia Hydia is offline
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Jak, day one go over the tools pallette

Jak, I have taken a 1 week class for photoshop and illustrator. The instructors started day one off with the tools pallette and you would be surprised how many people said they knew and understood the tools didn't.

They also worked directly from the photoshop tutorial book which I found to be a big help. I feel you should have a book in mind to help the students>ex Katrin for an example as a starter.

Also, the photoshop instructor wrote many notes while the illustrator wrote none. I can look back at my notes for photoshop to this day which is helpful but I can't remember a thing from the illustrator class.

This is my take on your question and I hope this might help you out.
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  #14  
Old 06-04-2002, 10:52 AM
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G. Couch G. Couch is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Vikki
Greg - I think Jak is right about skipping the photo history/process part. Only my opinion, but I don't think it would interest people who were only interested in learning how to restore with their computer. Nor do I think it's necessary either, and would probably be too long of a course anyway.
I've met loads of people that want to just play around with photos, and would take a simple class, but are not really interested in the whole package.
You and Jak are probably right. I guess I was thinking that if the people in the class had an interest in genealogy, history etc... they would want to know a bit about the process. I have a couple of friends who've brought me old photos, including several Tintypes, and they were very interested in learning about the history behind the process. Plus, doing the research helped me learn a lot! In the case of two of the Tintypes, learning about the process and clothing in the pictures (I got lots of good answers here!), helped to date the photos and ultimately helped my friend get an idea of which relative the photo was of!

I think Vicki brings up a good point about the interest in a Restoration class compared to a photo manipulation class. I guess there is no real way to find out until you actually start getting people enrolled.

Blacknight- One possible solution would be the use of a projector system to project an image of the instructor's computer screen. It's not something every school has, but it might be worth asking about. I definitely agree about having all of the computers networked. This would allow for a common server to save files to...each student could have their own folder on the server.

Another thing to consider is the type of computer that will be used. Many schools and institutions use only Macs, so it would be good to find out beforehand if you are going to need to brush up on the Mac OS...or vice versa.
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  #15  
Old 06-04-2002, 11:18 AM
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winwintoo winwintoo is offline
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I took a class last fall that was sold as a "PhotoShop" class. The instructor was very knowlegable about PS and I managed to learn a great deal from him.

He used a combination of demonstration (using and overhead projector) and hands-on work.

He covered the tools and demonstrated some of the really WOW things that you can do with PhotoShop - I was amazed and it was from him that I got the idea of learning more and starting my own business.

Based on my experience with that class, I suggest that almost as important as your lesson plan will be your contengency planning.

Out of a class of 12, 3 had never used a computer, 7 had never used a Mac, 11 had never seen or even heard of PhotoShop, 4 wanted to learn PSP, 6 had been told that they could retouch their photos using MSWord. When asked about their level of computer experience, all put up their hand for "very experienced" yet only one person besides me knew how to save a file so they could later find it again!!

Not to discourage you - even though the class ended up being a bit disjointed, I came away with enough knowledge to get me started and everyone in the class learned something.

Based on what you've shown us in your tutorials, your students will be enthralled with your instruction and you will have some budding PS experts among your graduates.

Best of luck,
Margaret
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  #16  
Old 06-04-2002, 11:44 AM
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Jakaleena Jakaleena is offline
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Those are really good points, Greg. I personally am very interested in the history of photographs. I have been reading a lot lately on tintypes and old methods of printing. I only recently discovered that an Albumen Gel Print is nothing more than a fancy name for what I have always just called a fiber print, only with "upscale" labeling to add commercial value.

The thing about approaching the school about this class is that it will be very fast and very basic. I'm not too concerned about what equipment they have, how much of it, OS, etc. as long as I can load Photoshop into it and there's a scanner. Even if there's no scanner, I can always provide an image to begin on, take the student photos home to scan, and bring a CD of them all with me to the next session. I've always been able to rig something workable together with a coat hanger, duct tape and spit.

The thing I'm most concerned about is that they can do a reasonable job on a personal photo that they want restored in just around 12 hours of instruction. I'd love to add in history, theory, and all of the things I personally love about this work, but I doubt there'll be time for that.

If they can leave knowing how to clone, paint, select & copy, move things around, blend edges and all of those other really basic things I will have accomplished my goal.

What I'm really trying to find out is what exactly are the most basic techniques we use to actually repair/restore a photo. It's been so long since I learned that I am having trouble remembering just when I met that line of finally knowing enough to make something look way better...

I'm looking to make a list I can work from, and am just trying to avoid leaving out anything important.

I really like Doug's idea about collaborating on a syllabus. Perhaps since there are a few of us considering this same option, we could put our heads together and come up with something all of us would agree to be a great plan for teaching photo restoration.

Something like:

A. Basic Skills

1. Day one - 2 hours
skill #1
skill #2
skill #3

by the end of this session, student should be able to _____


2. Day two- 2 hours
skill #1
skill #2
skill #3

by the end of this session, student should be able to _____


3. Day three- 2 hours
skill #1
skill #2
skill #3

by the end of this session, student should be able to _____


B. Intermediate Skills

1. Day one - 2 hours
skill #1
skill #2
skill #3

by the end of this session, student should be able to _____


2. Day two- 2 hours
skill #1
skill #2
skill #3

by the end of this session, student should be able to _____


3. Day three- 2 hours
skill #1
skill #2
skill #3

by the end of this session, student should be able to _____
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  #17  
Old 06-04-2002, 12:08 PM
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winwintoo winwintoo is offline
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Don't forget to include demonstrations of what PS is capable of and some of the shortcuts.

Eg. how to make a vignette - people struggle with this simple yet effective action.

Most people find a way to get things done and never take the time to find an easier way - a demonstration of some of the shortcuts that were talked about on another forum here would be valuable.


Margaret
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  #18  
Old 06-04-2002, 02:16 PM
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Ed_L Ed_L is offline
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This is an excellent thread. If you are going to teach restoration, my personal feeling is that it would be good to at least touch on a little part of the historical processes, especially how old photos should be handled. At the very least, if you opt not to teach any of this, you should make available a list of reading materials that you could recommend. The way society is today, if someone ruined an old photo because they handled it improperly, and they went through your class, it's not beyond the realm of possibilities that you could be sued if you don't at least mention that some photos need special handling, and provide avenues for the student to follow up on regarding this concern. Even if you win in court, you still lose.

As far as your abilities towards teaching, I don't think you have a problem there. If you make up a "business plan" for your course, you should make out okay. I also think that putting heads together to form a plan would be an excellent idea.

Best of luck in your endeavor to all who are considering this.

Ed
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  #19  
Old 06-04-2002, 05:17 PM
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Jakaleena Jakaleena is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by winwintoo
how to make a vignette - people struggle with this simple yet effective action.
Hey! "Easy Vignetting" - sounds like it's time to write another Tutorial!!!!
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  #20  
Old 06-04-2002, 05:34 PM
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winwintoo winwintoo is offline
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Your turorials are so clear and easy to follow - I learn a lot from them!!

I just had another thought - and I'm sure you've already thought of it - but here goes.

You mentioned that you'd like the class to be able to work on their own picture - which would be nice, but if everyone is working on a different picture, you might find yourself having to teach skills out of order and it could lead to pandemonium in the classroom.

I would suggest providing a file to work on for each skill so that everyone is working on the same thing and the file they're working would require the skill you're teaching at the time. Sort of like Katrin's book where she provides the files she used so you can follow along and be sure that you're doing the right thing.

Just a thought,
Margaret
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