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Photo Restoration Classes

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  #21  
Old 06-04-2002, 06:36 PM
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Jakaleena Jakaleena is offline
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Quote:
Your turorials are so clear and easy to follow - I learn a lot from them!!...

I would suggest providing a file to work on for each skill so that everyone is working on the same thing
I'm so glad you like the tutorials. I have a lot of fun writing them!

I actually thought of the "everyone working on the same project" idea. And I would probably do that for the teaching part of the class. But I'm hoping that there would also be LAB time for people to practice on something of their choosing.

I think that makes it more fun for them. Any image I would provide would mean little to them, but there is always excitement in seeing a cherished family heirloom transform before your very eyes, and the satisfaction of knowing you are the one who transformed it.

Quote:
If you are going to teach restoration, my personal feeling is that it would be good to at least touch on a little part of the historical processes, especially how old photos should be handled.
I definately agree on teaching how photos should be handled, cared for and stored. I just never considered that part of teaching history, per se. To me, teaching history would mean going over how the various photographic methods were arrived at, the progression through all of the different methods, glass plates, tintypes, Daguerrotypes (sp?), etc. It was those particular things that I felt would probably take up too much valuable time in a very short termed adult "fun" class. Providing written materials to reference those issues is an excellent suggestion!
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  #22  
Old 06-05-2002, 02:07 AM
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BigAl BigAl is offline
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I don't want to throw a spanner in the works, but would appreciate your comments.

I was approached a couple of years back to do exactly what Jak wants to do. I turned it down because I felt (very selfishly) that the market down here was small enough and I didn't want to create [more] competition. Secondly, like Jak (and I suppose many others), I'm largely self taught, and I feel if someone wants to learn something badly enough, they should find out about it for themselves. Doug's challenges are an excellent way to learn.

(BTW Jak, without lab time I don't think you'd be able to achieve too much.)
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  #23  
Old 06-05-2002, 02:39 AM
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CJ Swartz CJ Swartz is offline
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Quote:
I actually thought of the "everyone working on the same project" idea. And I would probably do that for the teaching part of the class. But I'm hoping that there would also be LAB time for people to practice on something of their choosing.

Their photo could be their special project which would be shared at the last session of the class with a summary of what techniques they used to accomplish their results.

As for the actual lesson plans -- it depends somewhat, I believe, on whether the students have met a prerequisite of prior PShop classes at the school (or can show a level of knowledge to you). If you try to deal with a range of students -- some who trip over a mouse and others who create art in PShop but have never tried restoration - it could be a waste of some students' time, and exasperating to you.

If they already know basic PShop skills, then lessons showing how the tools, selections, layers, layer adjustments, filters, blending modes and some shortcuts can be used to specifically address common photo retouch/restoration problems could be included.

Lesson One -- Black/White Image -- Improve Contrast, eliminate spots from scanning and improper storage

Selections (Quick Mask, Lasso, perhaps Magic Wand)
Layer Adjustments -- Levels, Curves
Filters - Blur/Gaussian Blur, Noise/Dust & Scratches
use of lasso & Dust & Scratches or Gauss. blur, then show use of History Brush

Lesson Two - color image -- Color correction
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  #24  
Old 06-05-2002, 02:49 AM
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Jakaleena Jakaleena is offline
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Hey Al, thanks for the response! The things you mentioned really did cross my mind a few times...

Quote:
I turned it down because I felt (very selfishly) that the market down here was small enough and I didn't want to create [more] competition.
The market here is small too. I'm having a pretty bumpy time gathering up clients. That's partly why I thought of this.

First, it will get some word of mouth going. Most of the people I suppose will be interested in learning to restore photos have other acquaintences and relatives that are interested in the same thing - old photos, genealogy, historical societies, etc. They'll talk. And perhaps it will generate more students or more clients. And, the people I'll be teaching probably won't have the skills mastered to do a really good job for a while, so it's not like they'll be doing anyone else's restorations. A lot of them won't be artistically inclined enough to ever really master the necessary skills. Many just won't have the patience for it. I'm guessing that at the very least, my name will be mentioned in a few conversations, hopefully in a kindly enough manner to get some sort of referrals from it. And not only for restoration work, but also for photography needs. Plus, there are people who would be unwilling to pay to have the restoration done for them, but who would pay to be taught to do it themselves. I used to work for a man who's business philosophy regarding his competition was, "if you can't GET their clients from them, then figure out a way to get them to BE YOUR clients." I'm also figuring that some will come into it thinking it's going to be fairly easy, and when it's not as easy as they thought, they'll just pay me to do it for them. If I'm any good at all, a little competition won't hurt me - it may even give me a shove into becoming better. And, I don't think most of them will look at it as a prospective profession. For me, the possibilities of a good outcome really outweigh the possibilities of a bad one.

Quote:
Secondly, like Jak (and I suppose many others), I'm largely self taught, and I feel if someone wants to learn something badly enough, they should find out about it for themselves. Doug's challenges are an excellent way to learn.
I hated that I had to scrounge around for basic knowledge on PS. I did have some instruction at my job, but our uses for PS were limited, and my instruction was limited to those uses. Sometimes I just wish there was someone to sit down here with me and SHOW me how to do something. Sometimes, I know someting that I am just dying to SHOW the person I'm trying to teach it to - like brush stroke techniques. I can describe it on here till my fingers are raw from typing, but it's just not the same as actually seeing what I'm doing. I love teaching people things. I've been responsible for training people at places I've been employed. I was an English tutor for ESL students in college. I considered a teaching profession after college, but ended up going back into photography instead. I love seeing someone get excited when they do something really cool for the first time. I love seeing that "light bulb" click on when something a person has been struggling to understand finally "clicks" for them. I love it when it's what I said, what I did, and how I presented it that turns those light bulbs on. Mostly, I just want to do it because I just like doing it.
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  #25  
Old 06-05-2002, 10:50 AM
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G. Couch G. Couch is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by CJ Swartz

If you try to deal with a range of students -- some who trip over a mouse and others who create art in PShop but have never tried restoration - it could be a waste of some students' time, and exasperating to you.
Quote:
Originally posted by winwintoo

Out of a class of 12, 3 had never used a computer, 7 had never used a Mac, 11 had never seen or even heard of PhotoShop, 4 wanted to learn PSP, 6 had been told that they could retouch their photos using MSWord. When asked about their level of computer experience, all put up their hand for "very experienced" yet only one person besides me knew how to save a file so they could later find it again!!

By the sound of it, this appears to be the number one obstacle to teaching an effective class. If you have to spend an entire class explaining what a layer is, it's not going to make for a rewarding experience for anyone!

You might find yourselves having to teach two classes...one as an Intro to digital imaging followed later by a class on Restoration.
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  #26  
Old 06-05-2002, 10:58 AM
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Doug Nelson Doug Nelson is offline
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I've also been considering offering classes. In fact, I'm thinking that classes might pay for an office or some storefront space for my restoration business.

I have taught classes before, and differing levels of expertise is a pain. My own solution I'm considering is to start with a basic course on computing, then a basic course on Photoshop, with my previous course as a pre-requisite, then basic restoration, with previous two courses as pre-requisites.

Each "semester" I'd offer all the courses previously offered, plus a new course. So, in this case, after 3 semesters I'd be offering 3 courses.
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  #27  
Old 06-05-2002, 04:17 PM
Vikki Vikki is offline
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JAK-(picking up on an older post...) thanks for the thumbs up on my site.
Even though I have version 7, and I like some of the features, I don't think it's a requirement for restoration. I do agree that a tablet is a must. I just can't imagine working without one!
Would you be teaching the class sans tablet?
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  #28  
Old 06-05-2002, 04:32 PM
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Jakaleena Jakaleena is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Vikki
I do agree that a tablet is a must. I just can't imagine working without one!
Would you be teaching the class sans tablet?
I probably would teach it with a mouse. I don't use a tablet, and I doubt that hobbyists who just want to do some family photos are going to be running out to get a Wacom. This facility is not a college or anything, it's just a basic adult learning facility. Although they do offer some serious classes, the majority of their offerings lean more toward hobby types of things.

I think that teaching them to get along with the absolute basics would be a good place to start. That way they can actually do the work on the setup they probably already have at home without believing that they have to run out and get a bunch of fancy new equipment.

Last edited by Jakaleena; 06-05-2002 at 04:54 PM.
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  #29  
Old 06-05-2002, 06:02 PM
Vikki Vikki is offline
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Jak-my thinking as well
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  #30  
Old 06-05-2002, 06:50 PM
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Jakaleena Jakaleena is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Doug Nelson
with my previous course as a pre-requisite
I like that idea, Doug. I had also considered a similar thing. Since the facility I'm hoping to approach offers some basic computing classes, it would seem easy enough to do. But, I also know that it's very possible, especially these days, for people to have good basic computing skills without ever having taken a computer class.

What I had actually considered was to also offer an alternative - to be able to "test in" to the class. Just offer a basic test to determine if the person had enough basic skills to get along without holding up the pace.

Something very simple like:

Get the file at path C:\Jackie\Pictures\RP Tuts\New Brush Tut\Screen Shot 01.jpg. Rename it Class Prerequisite. Transfer it to a new folder on the desktop named <Your Name>

I figure if the person can do that, they know enough to be able to just concentrate on learning restoration.

Then if I ever offered any kind of advanced class, they would be required to take the first one.

Also, in college, I was allowed to test in to some classes that I already was knowledgable about. There was a disclaimer for doing that which stated that I was responsible for having the appropriate skill levels, and that the class progression would not be paced slower to accomodate my lack of them.
Perhaps I could have a list of necessary prerequisite skills and a similar disclaimer...?
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