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Starting a Restoration Course

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  #11  
Old 10-25-2002, 08:17 PM
Vikki Vikki is offline
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This is great. I feel like I have a secret stash of teachers aides!
The paperwork does ask about prerequisites and maximun number of students.
I will most likely require some basic computer knowledge. As long as they know how to use a mouse, and follow instructions, I think we'll be ok (famous last words, right?)
I don't plan on getting into anything heavy, I will merely show people how to use the software, techniques, scanner, and printer for this project only. I will not be diversing at all. I do not want to get bogged down with technical stuff. To me, this should be fun, and productive. If any of you have read my tutorials, that might be an indication of my style.
I will be making up my own texbook, so that when they leave, they will be able to follow, step by step, and duplicate the processes.
From a teaching standpoint, I would like to keep the class small, so I would guess that 20 people would be the max. Tuition wise, I would like about 150 students.
I don't mind getting up in front of a large crowd when I know what I'm talking about, and have an eager audience (the great thing about continuing ed classes are that the students are willing participants).
Re: student discounts - I'm not sure if continuing ed qualifies, but I can't imagine why not - they are at a university......
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  #12  
Old 10-25-2002, 08:38 PM
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G. Couch G. Couch is offline
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Ed's pre-class test is a great idea. You could identify the people who are more technically advanced and then split the class into small groups- teaming up the more advanded person with some of the less technical people. That way people will not only be learning from you but also from people within their group as well. ...just an idea...
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  #13  
Old 10-25-2002, 09:12 PM
Vikki Vikki is offline
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That is a great idea. I like the idea of teaming students to help each other.
I'm not too sure about the test part though. I'd hate to start the class with a test, and have someone fail it! (Not quite the atmosphere I'm looking for.)
Anyone want to suggest some fun ways to test for skill level?
Keep in mind that I'm not requiring anything more than basic computer experience.
My lesson will be something like:
"Let's start by double clicking on the Elements icon......."
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  #14  
Old 10-25-2002, 10:07 PM
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DJ Dubovsky DJ Dubovsky is offline
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Location: Upper Penninsula of Michigan
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Vikki,
I'm so happy for you. It sounds like you're really thinking this through and have a good start already in your plans. It's a fantastic opportunity and I think you will do very well with it. You got some great advice from the members here and you always know you're not alone if things get difficult. We will be there to help any way we can. Keep us informed as you go along. It will be exciting to follow along with you.
I think you have a good idea going with Elements rather than PS because the cost difference is so vast and for beginning level that's all they need and it's something they can afford.

Good luck. Be confident. You definately have the talent to do this and do it well.
DJ
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  #15  
Old 10-25-2002, 10:14 PM
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Doug Nelson Doug Nelson is offline
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I'd probably make a sheet with basic computer skills mentioned explicitly, hand it out at beginning of first class (or include it in any pre-class papers), and tell them it's their job to make sure they know how to do everything on that sheet so they don't hold back the rest of the class by asking "what's the difference between a file and a folder?" or "how do I copy and paste something?"

And also specify which computers you'll be teaching on, so that they don't sign up knowing Macs and sit in front of PCs, or vice versa.

Plus, make sure there are funds to have licenced versions of whatever software you use on each machine. (personally I'd go with a lecture course using a projection device for my monitor)
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  #16  
Old 10-25-2002, 10:18 PM
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Doug Nelson Doug Nelson is offline
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And you may have a secret stash of teachers aides, but we'll have an experienced teaching advisor in case anyone else wants to do something similar
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  #17  
Old 10-25-2002, 10:27 PM
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jeaniesa jeaniesa is offline
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Vikki,

I'm putting in my vote for your chronicle as well (though it sounds like you've already decided to do it!)

A few comments:

If this is a "basic" course, I think that Elements is a good choice. It is affordable for many people even without a student discount, it should be easy for people with PS to follow along too, and with PS, you'd have to spend at least one class covering how to get around the product (assuming most of the class wouldn't have it since it's a basic class.)

I will most likely require some basic computer knowledge. As long as they know how to use a mouse, and follow instructions, I think we'll be ok (famous last words, right?)

Weeeelllllllll... I just took a PS class where I was one of the more advanced students in the class. I sat next to a person who was not as advanced. She had taken a semester-long PS class previously, but still became flustered when trying to follow the instructors very detailed (to my mind) instructions. (We all brought our own computers to the class and worked on them along with the instructor.) I learned towards the end of the class that there was at least one other student who also felt "panicked" when a technique involved more than a couple of steps. Since I already knew most of the info the instructor was covering, I was able to help the person sitting next to me and I made it a challenge to finish my work fast enough to help her catch up.

All of that to say, don't assume all of the students will follow your instructions exactly. And I think Greg's idea of pairing more advanced students with less advanced students is a good one - as long as the more advanced students don't feel "used", which could happen as they will have paid to take the class as a student, not a teacher. It's a tough call.

As far as a pre-test. I think it's a good idea so that you know what level your students are at, You can present it as a test which the students will take on the first day and on the last day (same test.) This will allow you to see what level the students are at the beginning, and allow the students to see how much they've learned throughout the class at the end. You might want to keep the first test until the very end of class, after they've taken the last test and then hand it back to them so they can see for themselves. If you don't hand it back until the end of class and don't give them a grade, then they shouldn't feel as though they've failed. I've had teachers do this before and I never felt that it was some sort of "judgement" - just a way for the instructor to better tailor the class to my needs.

My lesson will be something like:
"Let's start by double clicking on the Elements icon......."


And make sure to wait until everyone actually has Elements up and running before continuing. I know you already know that, but you might want to make sure that the icon is at the same position on every screen in the room, or some students will be confused.

Anyone want to suggest some fun ways to test for skill level?

I would make it multiple choice - inifinitely easier than fill-in-the-blank. Go through your lesson plans and create a couple of questions from each that would indicate to you that the student has a grasp of the knowledge. Obviously, the less advanced students won't be able to answer many of them, so you'll want to include some basic computer skills questions as well. (Things that they should know and NEED to know in order for class to go smoothly for you. E.g., how to start an application, how to find a file, how to open an image, etc.)

Hope this helps some. Good luck!
Jeanie
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  #18  
Old 10-26-2002, 05:15 AM
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clare clare is offline
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Hi Vikki,

First I think you would make a great teacher - the preperation you are doing now is good. ( my college's idea of Photoshop classes was to sit you in front of a computer tell you how to save a file - in the wrong place! - and say go to the filter menu!! - needless to say no one learnt anything and I found the whole experience fustrating.) The fact that you are asking questions and putting together a course structure will make it a success.

I had a thought on your test idea. Rather than you keeping the test papers let your students keep them - and review them together every week.

Don't call it a test call it a progress report -

Have all your sections on the paper
i.e.
Files and folders
scanning and saving files
retouching and restoration
(these cover all your lessons)

Next to these have however many lessons there are in boxes (8)

Each lesson ask them to fill in the progress report, in the next box.

This way a majority of your students will have a large amount of missed boxes in lesson one, but by lesson two they will have more ticks and by the end hopefully they will have a page full of ticks

The fact that it is a progress report allows your students to beable to see what they have learnt means that each lesson they will go home feeling wow I achieved something tonight and I have the progress report to re-enforce it. Everyone enjoys completing something.

On the back of the page or on a seperate page have just a blank bunch of lines with the tittle of something like 'additional information I have learnt' This is for your students to add what ever they have learnt above the information in the course structure - so its like a Plus list. ( this will mean if a student has a certain image with a certain problem that they have overcome they can add that there )

Hope this helps
Good Luck
Clare
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  #19  
Old 11-05-2002, 04:42 PM
Vikki Vikki is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2001
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Update: 11-5-02

As I was completing the teacher's packet forms, it occured to me that I had better find out right away if the school had computers and software available for my class.
I called the director with these specific questions. They do have computers (22) and Photoshop available. The director suggested we conduct the interview right away, and at that time, we could further discuss the course requirements. So, I have an interview tomorrow afternoon.
This is what I will be taking to the interview:
The required forms
A course outline/timeline
A class fee proposal
A large portfolio of my work
Printed versions of my online tutorials (perhaps this will give him an idea of my "style").
Have I forgotten anything?

The only obstacle to this whole thing is whether there will be an interest. Even though I believe there is, (8000+ visitors to my website) there isn't actually much one could do to prove it - on a local basis.

Stay tuned for the interview outcome!
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  #20  
Old 11-05-2002, 05:18 PM
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clare clare is offline
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Good Luck with your interview.
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