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Photo-Based Art Emulating natural-media painting techniques

Creative interpretations: Car - Classic Ford (Neve)

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  #11  
Old 02-02-2005, 08:59 AM
jaykita jaykita is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by byRo
I'd given up on art history, seeing the work of you guys (and girls), I'll have to reconsider.
Tutorials?
Ok, here's a tutorial for you. Rô, please tell me what you think.

First of all, for my art history brush, I chose a brush from David Nagel's hair and fur series, downsized to about 4.
I used these settings for my art history brush:
Brush size 1/ mode "darken"/ opacity 100/ style "tight short"/ area 1px/ tolerance 1%.
Start with Original layer 1 - flatten image. In the history palette, create new snapshot, and set source for the history brush.
Go back to the layer's palette, create a new blank layer 2, fill with white 100% opacity. Blend normal.
Duplicate the original layer 1 and pull on top of stack. Reduce its opacity to 50%. This is our template. Layer 3.
Select layer 2, (the white fill layer), It will be highlighted. It is on this layer that our art history brush will create its image.
Go over entire layer once with art history brush using the settings given above. The fun is that you can see your paint strokes, so you have quite a bit of control over your image.
Go over color areas one more time if that's what you want to do.
Switch off layer visibility ( the eye) on layer 3 from time to time to view your creation.
When done, go to layer 3, increase opacity to 100%, and change to overlay blend mode.
Go to Select all - copy merged, and paste as a new layer 4.
Apply filter - artistic - watercolor settings 14,0,1. You can experiment with these settings.
And...you're done. Have fun!
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  #12  
Old 02-02-2005, 09:57 AM
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Janet Petty Janet Petty is offline
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I'm going to be completely contrary here; so bear with me while I try to be articulate (not an easy task for me sometimes ).

Jaykita, you get amazing effects with your art work. I totally and thoroughly am in awe with the artistic things you do. If I had as much talent in my whole body that you have in your little finger, I would count myself happy.

But, I disagree with your Art History thing. It is much easier to get great results without having to toggle back and forth between layers to see your progress. "Switch off layer visibility ( the eye) on layer 3 from time to time to view your creation." Why create a layer three unless you want a safe backup layer? Isn't it much easier to 1. Open the image, 2. Create a background copy, 3. Create a snapshot, 4. Fill the background copy with white (or whatever color you want), 5. Begin painting? That way you never have to toggle between layers to see your progress. You have all the same creative options open and can still add the merged layers, textures, etc. to the final image after painting as desired.

Correct me if wrong. Advice and suggestions are always welcome.

Janet
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  #13  
Old 02-02-2005, 10:44 AM
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kiska kiska is offline
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Thanks, Janet, I surely do struggle with the history brush. When I have lots of layers, I can never get it to work.

kiska
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  #14  
Old 02-02-2005, 11:15 AM
jaykita jaykita is offline
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Oh Janet

Do i have to reply?
If you dont have a layer 3, opacity low, then you have a blank white wall in front of you, with a brush that decides all. Like a runaway horse. You go where it takes you.
Maybe the brush is the star, but surely, you would like to be the Director/Producer?
That's all that layer 3 helps you do.
So, I dont quite understand your "Why create a layer three unless you want a safe backup layer". You can delete layer 3 anytime you want. I retained layer 3,overlay blend, it just looked good to me to keep it, thats all.
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  #15  
Old 02-02-2005, 11:38 AM
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JustChecking JustChecking is offline
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well, i typically create (white) fill layer above the background and set its opacity to 50% or so, and draw in empty layers above this one... that way i can use original as a guide, while clearly seeing what i drew so far

hope it doesn't sound too stupid
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  #16  
Old 02-02-2005, 11:46 AM
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Janet Petty Janet Petty is offline
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I suppose that like everything else in Photoshop there are several ways of doing the same thing. To each his/her own. Whatever floats your boat and all those other trite sayings.

Runaway horse, huh? Hmmm, I've never had that happen. Whoa except in real life. And it ain't no piknik neither.

Janet
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  #17  
Old 02-02-2005, 02:14 PM
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byRo byRo is offline
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Wow! I asked for one tutorial and got three!!
Great stuff guys and gals, going to be difficult to wait till tomorrow to try this stuff.

jaykita
- is there a link to the brushes you mentioned?
- Are these 'special brushes' for art history or just the normal ones?
- Do I just shove new brushes into a folder some place?
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  #18  
Old 02-02-2005, 04:20 PM
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JustChecking JustChecking is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by byRo
jaykita
- is there a link to the brushes you mentioned?
- Do I just shove new brushes into a folder some place?
http://www.creativemac.com/articles/...type=downloads - those "Brushes for Adobe Photoshop, Series xx", xx is 1-25 currently, most probably there'll be more...

all brushes work w/ AHB, but some crapply

as for the instalation, just copy those .abr files to "[photoshop directory]\Presets\Brushes\", and load them - click that small triangle (see the attachment), choose from that list that pops out, and then choose "append" (this will add those brushes to the end of brushes list)
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File Type: jpg load.JPG (32.5 KB, 7 views)
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  #19  
Old 02-03-2005, 03:57 AM
jaykita jaykita is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by byRo
Wow! I asked for one tutorial and got three!!
Great stuff guys and gals, going to be difficult to wait till tomorrow to try this stuff.

jaykita
- is there a link to the brushes you mentioned?
- Are these 'special brushes' for art history or just the normal ones?
- Do I just shove new brushes into a folder some place?
I used the Nagel Series 12-14 brush, 85 downsized to 7, for my art history brush. You have to resize them, they're huge. Here is the link.
Re download and installation, you'll find an explanation at this website.
Most all brushes can be used for art history, i think.
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  #20  
Old 02-04-2005, 12:22 PM
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CJ Swartz CJ Swartz is offline
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Nice subject photo to work with, and am enjoying the renditions and the art history brush discussions!

This was an accident that I liked -- I had read a tutorial about enhancing images with weak skies with use of the Distort->Diffuse Glow filter on a copy layer (then set blend mode to Difference, move to layer copy below - add layer mask, Apply Image, set blend mode to Linear Burn and trash the top layer that you ran the Diffuse Glow on), and I ran that to see what would happen on an image without skies, AND I was playing with the Torn Edges on a paper layer, and then I end up looking at an aged looking version of an old car -- decided to run Selective Color to reduce some black, cyan, etc., added an overlay layer to paint with black to bring back a bit of detail, and then Postered Edges to bring back some of the shape.
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File Type: jpg CI-OldFord2-cj.jpg (95.6 KB, 19 views)
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