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How to resize borrowed body parts

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  #1  
Old 12-11-2005, 03:04 PM
Gerald McClaren Gerald McClaren is offline
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How to resize borrowed body parts

How do someone resize a borrowed body part? I would like to copy an ear from my aunt and place it on my mother. Can someone please tell me how to do that process. I have Photoshop CS2.

Gerald McClaren

Last edited by Gerald McClaren; 12-11-2005 at 11:12 PM. Reason: Photoshop Info
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Old 12-11-2005, 03:30 PM
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Larbear Larbear is offline
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Body Parts

Gerald,

Not knowing what software your using, I can tell you how I do it with Photoshop. Open the picture you want to take the ear from, use the lasso tool, or the extract tool and trace around the ear until you get back to your starting point. Select edit, copy, and paste the ear on a new layer by itself. Select your free transform tool (cntrl T, cntrl 0 on a PC) and you should see the transform handles around your selection. lf you're using photoshop you might want to experiment with the amount of feathering of the edges of the ear you're transplanting. Open up the image you want to transfer the ear to and drag the ear on to that photo. Clear as mud right. I'm sure there are other ways to do this, but this one works for me.

Larbear
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Old 12-11-2005, 03:33 PM
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bart_hickman bart_hickman is offline
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Generally-speaking, you first need to remove the existing body part--cloning is probably the most straightforward method. To the extent the new body part will cover the old body part, then you can skip this.

Then you paste the new body part on its own layer and resize, rotate, warp, or otherwise transform it to fit properly. Additionally, adjustments to the overall lighting of the new body part may be needed (there are many, many ways to do this--curves, color balance, lighten or darken layers, etc...)

You will also want to make sure the new body part selection was appropriately feathered to blend with the new body (sometimes its best to do this part last so you can see the final result changing as you make the changes). Its also good to make sure the new body part lighting direction matches the new body.

Im leaving out about a zillion other tweaks one might employ depending on the specific circumstances. Thats what practice is for.

Bart
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Old 12-11-2005, 03:36 PM
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briarrose briarrose is offline
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If you're using Photoshop, you use the Transform feature. (The instructions below include shortcuts are for PCs...if you're using a Mac, use the appropriate Mac shortcuts. :-))

Open the image you're going to paste TO (your mom)...

Open the image you wish to paste FROM (your aunt)...and select, then copy the ear, and minimize the image.

Maximize the image with your mom in it...single click within the image to make sure it's active (or make sure the top layer on your layer pallette is active, by single clicking on it), the hit CTRL + V, to paste the ear to a new layer.

With the "ear" layer still active, hit CTRL + T, to activate the Free Transform feature. You'll see "boundary" marks in a square or rectangle, around the ear. letting you know you're in "transform" mode. Hover your cursor over the borders/boundary marks until your cursor changes to a vertical or horizontal double-sided arrrow, then left click and drag to resize the ear.

If you need to rotate the ear slightly, hover your cursor OUTSIDE one of the borders of the ear, until you get a curved double arrow, then left click and drag in the direction you wish to rotate your image.

When you're happy with your "transformation", hit "Enter", to apply the changes.

There are a variety of choices with the Transform feature. If you need to skew the image, distort it, flip it horizontally or vertically, or change it's persepctive, you can play around with the menu choices under: Edit/Transform. They aren't quite as easy to use as Free Transform--but you still use them the same way (hover your cursor over the borders, left click and drag, hit Enter to apply).

Bear in mind that if there is a HUGE difference in image size, or if the resolution is different (ie, 72 dpi and 300 dpi) between the two images--then you might need to do some manual resizing and resampling before you do the copy/paste/transform steps... Also, if you don't see the "boundaries" when you do a Transform--then you may need to adjust your workspace, so that you can see them--they could be out of bounds of your original image, if you're copying from a very large document, and haven't resize/resampled, prior to copying and pasting. :-)

Hope that helps--and have fun with it! :-)
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Old 12-11-2005, 03:37 PM
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philbach philbach is offline
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Resizing

Well its important initially to check the resolution of both digital photographs so you won't be surprised when you paste. First you open both photos and make sure they are at the same resolution so you won't get a size change.

Then you select the aunt's ear and copy it to the clipboard and paste it into mothers photo. The paste should come up in a new layer (layer1). If you are copying a right ear and pasting to make a right ear on mother no problem. If you are going to do mothers left ear then use the edit transform and flip horizontal.

At this point I lower the opacity of the aunt's ear layer (layer 1) to about 50% so I can see what mother's ear area looks like. I then use the edit transform command and move and rotate and size the ear to where it belongs.

Bring the opacity of layer 1 up to 100% and place a layer mask on layer 1. Paint the mask with black where you don't want the new ear to show. In addition you need to look carefully at the luminosity, and Color of the new ear, shadows and such.

So something like that.
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Old 12-12-2005, 01:00 PM
Gerald McClaren Gerald McClaren is offline
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Resized borrowed body parts

I had tried the techniques that were described above and the ear was placed on my mother, however, I don't know how to apply a feather so that the ear blend in with the face. One technique described to apply the feathering after the ear is pasted on the face, but I don't how to do that. Please tell me how to apply the feathering. I appreciated everyone help that mentioned how to resized a body part, it really works. The ear is on straight except, I also need to match the color of the ear to the skin. I'll have you guys have a look when it is completed

Gerald McClaren
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Old 12-12-2005, 02:41 PM
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philbach philbach is offline
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Body Parts

Well I would suggest you post the two photos without retouching. There are several experts here and they will show you the steps they took to get the desired result. To post the photo us the size should be about 800 pixels at its max dimension and then use the save for web as jpeg function in photoshop. There is more specific info about posting photos on this site incidentally.
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Old 12-12-2005, 03:28 PM
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briarrose briarrose is offline
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Feathering after the ear is pasted on the face would most likely be done painting on a layer mask on the ear layer, using either a) a soft brush or b) adding a Gaussian blur to the layer.

"Feathering" refers to softening the edges of some part of the image--in this case, the harsh edges of the cut out ear. When you feather--you have a "transition area", where you have a blend of transparent and opaque pixels, allowing some of the image BELOW your "ear" layer to show through, giving you a softer edge.

Sometimes you'll hear people refer to "hard edges" or "soft edges", to refer to how little or how much a cut-out is feathered. A hard edge is where there is an abrupt transition from one part of an image to another--opaque image, then nothing. Ie, right now, it sounds like you have a hard edge on your ear cut out--so it doesn't blend in well, with the image below it.

A soft edge is where you have a gradual blend of opaque and transparent areas--which helps a pasted piece of data blend in more seamlessly. They both have their place in retouching, depending on what you're doing.

Here are a couple of examples of bad feathering and better feathering, on similar images, to illustrate what I'm talking about:

Bad feathering - looks "cut out"--notice the edges of the hair on the girls. It either looks either too hard (the brunettes) or too soft (the blonde, in the green dress): http://www.pbase.com/briarrose/image/38226144

Better feathering - http://www.pbase.com/image/40414249 --notice the edges of the hair again - this time, there's a softer, more gradual transition--but not too much of it--there's still a definable "edge of the head" area on each girl. (This has been further helped by my freehanding flyaway hair in, after the copy--but the feathered edge had to be just right, for the two to blend in.)

Feathering can be done either before you copy something--or after--but unless you're proficient with layer masks, it is probably easiest to do it before copying. I suspect most people do it before--and then simply refine the feathering, if needed, using a layer mask. (Although if your initial selection and feather amount is good enough, you shouldn't have to do anything afterwards! ;-))

To feather before you copy--

--make your selection, then choose Select/Feather
--pick a pixel amount that seems appropriate to your image, and the amount of "blended" information you need. If you're working with a small image, 1 pixel might be appropriate...but if you're working with a large image (say, from a 5mp camera), then you might need 10-15 pixels worth of feathering--again, depending on what seems appropriate to your image, and where you made your selection.
--after applying the "feather", copy, and then paste the copy in it's new home

There's no specific rule you can follow regarding how much or how little to feather--just use your eyes and your common sense (ie, a hard surface, like a metal box probably needs less "transition area"--and thus, less feathering...whereas a wedding veil might tolerate more feathering)...and if you don't like what you did--undo! :-)
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Old 12-12-2005, 05:02 PM
kev kev is offline
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rather than lasso

I would suggest using a pen tool to mask the initial ear. Make your path clip inside any edge rasters or shadow/highlight transfer so that when you transplant, there is no halo of any kind. Using free transform+warp, perspective, and skew as well as liquification if necessary, you should be able to make it fit. Then go in on the edges and add the shadows or higlights necessary to match the edge transfer to the way it occurs along the rest of the head's contour. Some feathering can be used, but it's best to start off with a vector mask and merely transport the entire image masked. Then you can experiment with feathering by copying the vector mask as a path (so you can go back) then delete the vector mask directly on the layer, and make a selection from the path you saved. From that, feather "x" number of pixels, add layer mask current selection, and save the layer by the amount of feathering. If you copy the layer a couple times, you can see how much feathering is optimal, or you can do what I do and blend it manually. I don't often swap ears, but eyes are pretty common.
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  #10  
Old 12-13-2005, 01:21 PM
Gerald McClaren Gerald McClaren is offline
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Resized borrowed body parts

This is a rough sample of the borrowed ear and the feathering. It was feathered 10 pixels. How can I change my background and make the ear the same color of the face?
Second , How can I make the hair a little more realistic?

Gerald McClaren
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