RetouchPRO

Go Back   RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Restoration
Register Blogs FAQ Site Nav Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Photo Restoration Repairing damaged photos

2 questions.....one about sepia and one about prescanning correction

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 03-29-2006, 08:42 PM
Fazools Fazools is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: NC
Posts: 59
2 questions.....one about sepia and one about prescanning correction

This board is an ADDers nightmare, I keep getting distracted everytime I come here to post a question.

1. This may be basic, but I could not find the answer in my distracted searches. Were photos ever taken with the sepia or light brown hue? Or are all of the ones I see due to fading? I have asked at antique shops and they do not really know either so I thought someone here must know. I have been scanning each pic twice, once with the sepia just in case, and then in silverfast, pulling the saturation all the way down and working with the shadows and such. It still scans as a 24bit color pic, but without any saturation.

2. I have Silverfast 6 AI, with and Epson 4490 and wanted to know to what extent or how far you all go (if you use software like this) to correct colors, scratches and such before scanning both color photos, and older sepia faded pics, and even some slides.

I feel like I am doing a lot of my corrections in Silverfast (curves, levels, selective color and scratches) before even getting it to Photoshop CS2 and my filters.

I always figured that if I could startd with a good foundation in PS I would be better off. for example, removing a magenta colorcast from poor development at the lab. But I am afraid that I am spending the energy in the wrong software as I try to get the colors and contrast so perfect in silverfast as opposed to waiting and doing that in photoshop.

Any Advice is welcome.
Reply With Quote top
  #2  
Old 03-29-2006, 10:02 PM
mistermonday's Avatar
mistermonday mistermonday is offline
Moderator
Patron
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 3,028
Well, some of those sepia colored prints are the result of fading but some were actually the immediate result of the photographic development process and materials used at the time. Today after restoration of these prints, some and depending on the image subject, some viewers prefer the sepia look, other prefer the black & white look. It's really a matter of taste.

As for prescanning, I have tried a number of techniques and methods. Whether I am using a Flatbed, negative, or slide scanner I do no pre-processing. I take the native scan from the scanner in the highest resolution I need, in the largest A/D bit resolution (12 - 16 bits) and import it directly into PS. No color correction, no curve adjustments, no sharpening, no autolevel, no descreening, no anything. Any post scan adjustments are done in PS plus any other associated plugins and tools in my PS workflow.

If you have the scanner apply some of the destructive adjustments, your only recourse is to re-scan. There are no adjustment layers to delete. Not to mention all the other reasons you may have chosen PS for as your primary image editing tool.

Regards, Murray
Reply With Quote top
  #3  
Old 03-29-2006, 10:07 PM
Mike Mike is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Grand Junction CO USA
Posts: 683
1. No photos where taken with a sepia tone, they where taken in black and white, then prints from those black and white negatives where toned in a special sepia process. Last I knew one could still buy sepia toning chemicals. Its kind of a fun process if you do not have to make to many at one time. So there are two ways to a sepia print, intentional and by ageing.

2. I am not familier with that software so do not have an opinion.

Hope this helps

Mike
Reply With Quote top
  #4  
Old 03-30-2006, 12:59 AM
JayNads's Avatar
JayNads JayNads is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Wading River, New York
Posts: 59
[QUOTE=Mike]1. No photos where taken with a sepia tone, they where taken in black and white, then prints from those black and white negatives where toned in a special sepia process. Last I knew one could still buy sepia toning chemicals. Its kind of a fun process if you do not have to make to many at one time. So there are two ways to a sepia print, intentional and by ageing.

Sepia toning can be bought in most any photo supply stores. It's a two step process, and takes about 10 minutes. You can use any just about any black and white photo, no matter how long ago it was processed. First it's bleached, during which the photo actually turns nearly white. Then it's rinsed and put into the sepia toning. Almost immediately, the picture re-appears and often does so with better shadow detail. This process was done in the past because sepia-toning made the photo archival, and far less prone to fading than the original.
Reply With Quote top
  #5  
Old 03-30-2006, 08:08 PM
Ed_L's Avatar
Ed_L Ed_L is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: northwest Indiana, about 45 minutes from Chicago, IL
Posts: 2,824
Back during the days of WW2, and maybe WW1, soldiers in the field sometimes used coffee during processing to obtain a sepia effect. Chemicals were not easily obtainable, such as those used in the darkroom.

Edx
Reply With Quote top
Reply

  RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Restoration


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright © 2016 Doug Nelson. All Rights Reserved