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Photo Restoration Repairing damaged photos

Problem: Bad Case Of Lens Flare

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  #11  
Old 04-12-2006, 07:44 PM
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You are right. The same defect appears all four of the grave-side pictures that I have. A light leak is a better explaination. There are also chemical blue streaks from improper washing. (I have to keep reminding myself that in 1920-1940 things were soo different. This person started taking pictures during the depression because he was unemployed for most of it.) Uncoated lenses is a big problem. Generally cheap equipment, at least in this case. AND he used water out of a pump with no treatment or filtration! Poor storage conditions - no A/C, no refrigerator, at least for the chemicals. Finally, he didn't get to enlarge his mistakes, he only made contact prints.)

I haven't used Lab but I have heard enough that I intend to investigate it. However, your method and results look alot like mine, that I was not happy with. (Its hard to really say without a larger work than I can open side by side with mine in PS.)

The method I used was to use the luminescence mask and build multiple layers until you get it right. I've successfully done this using multiply or soft light. I've also done an inversion and used screen mode. On this pic I couldn't get a good result. The Blacks were too dense in relationship to the normal range of the picture.

Earlier someone showed a better result. She got that by building the mid-range. I haven't got back to the pic yet, but I am at least temporarily convinced that is the real problem and that when I saw "lens flare" I jumped too quick and missed the real problem.

Do you agree that hers is a better result? I realize that is a matter of taste and I may feel different when I actually get in PS and start experimenting with some of these suggestions.

Thanks for the advice.
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  #12  
Old 04-20-2006, 09:33 AM
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Hi there

Here is a very simple way;

Open a blank layer set to colorburn and filled with the neutral color...white. Then with a large brush set to 3 percent opacity, slowly build up contrast where needed.

Butch
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  #13  
Old 04-20-2006, 10:02 AM
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Butch!!! Thank You, Thank You!!

A great simple solution and so easy.

Here's a color photo you all can practice this technique on. This drove me nuts until Butch proffered this elequent solution!
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  #14  
Old 04-20-2006, 02:36 PM
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Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
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i had a go at this also. unless this is a historical image for a museum or something, i'd crop off that bottom part. nothing there worth saving. the rest was selections and treatments of different parts of the image with the 32 band gray plugin, contrast/lightness, dav's burn/white treatment mentioned above, some lighten/darken tool and a bit of colorizing.

craig
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  #15  
Old 04-20-2006, 06:09 PM
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Thumbs down To Crop or not to crop

Butch, Swampy, Craig - Thanks for the technique. That's a new one for me. I've got a couple new techniques to try out as soon as I get back to that picture. (I've been distracted by this website)

Craig's suggestion about cropping brings up something interesting that I recently observed that has 'expanded' my taste in cropping. In my personal work I've been experimenting with 'over cropped' pictures, like cropping down to 3/4 of a person's head. (I like it). Anyway, I guess I've been waiting to try out this observation someone that might care!

I started restoring my grandfather's photos from the 20-30-40's. He was an just amateur but I soon discovered that he had an excellent eye. He used two cameras: 120 (and half frames) and a 116 which is 2 3/4 x 4 5/8 - really long, and he framed his pictures differently than I ever had or knew. See the attached example. He liked to place the center of mass of the subject above the geometric center of the frame, often leaving considerable space below the subject. Of course, this results in a slightly unbalanced picture, that creates a little stress and hence a little more interest. It works double on the picture of him and my mother; her being held so high above the ground.

Do you see what I mean? Is this fundamentally unsound thinking? Of 50 or so 116 negatives that I have restored, I have only reframed about 1/3 of these down to a standard modern size, and its going to prove expensive when I start mounting and framing some of them! Interesting parallel to the move to HD TV.
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  #16  
Old 04-20-2006, 06:25 PM
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Blue Dog...

There is rhyme and reason why your granddad off set his photos. Designers called it the "Golden Rule of Thirds". There are other names, but the principal remains the same. Put the main element of your design at a juncture of the crosses on a tic-tac-toe grid. Do a google on "rule of thirds". Interesting reading all over the place.

Below is an example of a photo framed by the rule.
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  #17  
Old 04-20-2006, 06:57 PM
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Love them Golden Rules

Intuitively I know that, but I didn't get any formal training in art or photography and I think that gives me a lack of confidence in my 'instincts'. It was such a surprise 'working' in a strange format. It reminds me of shooting 4x5. Composing a picture when the image is upside-down, backward, and green like a night-scope was so unsettling that it made me rethink the whole 'automatic' 35mm process that was burned into my brain. Ultimately it made me a better photographer.

Funny, he started photography during the recession. Not only was it a recession where he and everyone else were despirately trying to keep their jobs, but on top of that he broke is collar bone playing basketball and got let go. The family can't figure out where he got the money to do any of this because everyone was so dirt poor before the recession!
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  #18  
Old 04-20-2006, 07:04 PM
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I went to get a cup of coffee and swampy beat me to the post...

Quote:
Originally Posted by blue dog
..... but I soon discovered that he had an excellent eye. ....... He liked to place the center of mass of the subject above the geometric center of the frame, often leaving considerable space below the subject.
When talking about composition in art, one has to start with a disclaimer - there are no rights and wrongs.
That said, the composition of this photo is beautifully done.
I use a composition guide based on the Golden Mean (and its "multiples"), and it's uncanny how this hits all the sweet spots.
Quote:
Originally Posted by blue dog
Of course, this results in a slightly unbalanced picture, that creates a little stress and hence a little more interest. It works double on the picture of him and my mother; her being held so high above the ground.
(see disclaimer) I see it exactly the other way round. If you put the mass at the centre of the image it is then that we get uncomfortable as our eyes wander between one side and the other. Putting the mass off-centre, we know there's a big side and a small side and don't have to think about that any more, so the result is more "restful".
The best ratio big / small turns out to be the "Golden Ratio", which photographers have distorted to the "rule of thirds".

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  #19  
Old 04-20-2006, 07:50 PM
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The Da Vinci Code

I did a lot of reading recently when I got hooked on the Da Vinci Code. In one of the related books, might have been "The Knights Templar" , there was a long analysis showing the role of the Golden Ratio or Golden Proportion or Divine Ratio in the architecture of the Masons of ancient Egypt, the art of Leonardo Da Vinci, a French renaissance artist (Poisson?), Boticelli, Fibonnaci, Seurat, on and on. Oh what a wonderful, fertile ground for conspiracy theorists! (I am sure I mis-spelled at least half of those!)

I just wish that I had been able to study this stuff when I was young.
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  #20  
Old 04-20-2006, 07:58 PM
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Ro: Jobim?

There are some subjects that I am an expert or nearly so, depending on your own point of view. You said you were an "Englishman in Brasil". Are you an ex-patriot or was that a humorous reference to Sting's song.

Anyway, one of my great loves and a subject that I know far to much about is Jobim. Surely, you haven't lived there since the 60's? Ah. I keep forgetting that there aren't that many people who even remember the 60's. Well, I have always wanted to go to Brasil and even thought of learning Portuguese. Unfortunately, language is not something that I am any good at.

PS. My Avatar is Franklin, my best friend. He's a Portuguese Water Dog. The best dog I could ever imagine.
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