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Photo Restoration Repairing damaged photos

I need help.... labor of love.

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  #1  
Old 04-18-2006, 06:17 PM
lwjphoto's Avatar
lwjphoto lwjphoto is offline
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Lightbulb I need help.... labor of love.

this is a picture of my grandmother. I try to restoration this picture for my mother and my aunts for mother's day. I think they would really like it. my grandmother pass away almost two years ago.

I need help with selecting brush stoke for clone stamp and to fix really damaged areas such as background and jacket on the left side. I would greatly appreciate all tips on how to restoration this picture.

P.S. I kind of of need a workflow or where to start.
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File Type: jpg mattie.jpg (24.0 KB, 107 views)
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  #2  
Old 04-18-2006, 07:18 PM
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Frank Lopes Frank Lopes is offline
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First of all: welcome aboard

Now for the work-flow:

I would scan the image at a higher resolution. Generally speaking, the higher the resolution, the easier it is to retouch the image. The reason for this is because the higher the resolution the more information you have to work with. I would also recommend that you scan it in color even if ultimately you want a black and white photo.

I would adjust the levels and curves (if you are not familiar with them, we'll help you).

Regarding the size and stroke of the brush, here is my golden rule: I use the smallest one that will do the job. For very large areas (background, walls, floors etc.) I'll use maybe a 75 or 100 pixel very soft brush. However don't take this as a final rule because it all depends of the resolution of the image: the larger the image, the bigger the brushes you will be able to use. And off course the size of the defect.

I would fix noise and scratches that the image might have. I would also test at this point if sharpening or softening would improve the image. It may or may not. You will have to be the judge on this.

At this point you should have a sharp, well contrasted image that, however, still needs repairs.

How to repair the rips and scratches? There is no "magic wand". Depending of the severity of the defects you will need to use a multitude of tools that in some cases will give very nice results but in other cases may not. There is only one way to get there: experiment with the tools available to you.

When it comes time to start repairing the image defects, I start with the face, then the body and finally the background. Others will probably recommend slightly different work-flows depending of their level of knowledge of the software used and the years of experience. Once you do this a few times you will notice that you will become more comfortable with certain sequences. Stick with the one that gives you the best results.

Once you start working on the image, post your progress and I'm sure others will jump in and help you in your efforts.

Once again, welcome aboard!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by lwjphoto
this is a picture of my grandmother. I try to restoration this
...
P.S. I kind of of need a workflow or where to start.
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  #3  
Old 04-18-2006, 08:38 PM
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byRo byRo is offline
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Hi, lwjphoto. Welcome to RetouchPRO

I hate it when peole tell me that I ought to have a plan before starting a project - I just want to jump in and get started.
So don't hate me, OK?

You need a plan! (plus everything Frank posted above)

When you're starting out it's not easy to look at an image and know what you will have to do. Sometimes a job can look difficult and turn out easy, and (too many) other times it's the other way round.
I'll risk myself here by saying that this is easier than it looks.

In any photo there is a centre of attraction, a focus for the eyes - and there is the rest. In retouching the "focus" should be as perfect as possible while the "rest" has a lot more leeway (margin for error).

In this case the focus is the face, hair and blouse. You're lucky that these areas are quite well preserved. All of the worst damage is in the background.

So my advice. Don't waste time with the background, just paint over the cracks or do away with it all together. I don't see any details in the coat, so paint away.
Concentrate your efforts on the face.

Welcome aboard!

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  #4  
Old 04-19-2006, 12:33 PM
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lwjphoto lwjphoto is offline
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Lightbulb great advice, I am working on it.

I appreciate the help and useful. I rescanned at high resolution. I curved, leveled, and did a high pass sharp on to have an idea of color correction would look like. I will admit I do a lot of glamour shot retouching is there is to much thing with most of them. This is different because I have to think. Once color corrected picture look great b&w or colorized. I am send another picture this is my attempt filling in the cracks ... I use clone brush but I brush is to soft and my don't look right. I came to conclusion that I will probably to airbrush of jacket and creat a different background. Question should use clone to repair cracks on the face or use an airbrush.
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  #5  
Old 04-19-2006, 01:05 PM
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Frank Lopes Frank Lopes is offline
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Is this the size of the scanned image?
What was the resolution?

Quote:
Originally Posted by lwjphoto
I appreciate the help and useful. I rescanned at high s to ....
to repair cracks on the face or use an airbrush.
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  #6  
Old 04-19-2006, 01:54 PM
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lwjphoto lwjphoto is offline
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Lightbulb retouch

the resolution is 300 pixels....
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  #7  
Old 04-19-2006, 02:42 PM
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Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
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lwjphoto,

welcome to RP.

this is actually a pretty easy image to work on. it might look tough to start because of all the background damage. but, the important parts still have lots of detail, thus, making this a pretty easy image to restore, at least for personal use. i wouldnt try to sell it to Ken Burns of PBS 'Civil War' fame, or a museum, but for personal use, you can do some really quick things to make this job look a lot easier.

1. make a duplicate image on a new layer.

2. desaturate the image to a complete black and white. (i used the Fast Fix plugin for this).

3. set your clone tool to 100% opacity (really strong), make a new blank raster layer and set your clone tool to 'use all layers', and just start cloning over all that damaged background. (this puts all the cloning changes on the blank raster layer by themselves). if you want to try to save some of the backdrop, that's fine. there's not a lot there, but it does add character and keep with the history of the image. you could paint some of it back in if desired.

those simple steps will remove a lot of the 'clutter' and make the job seem quite a bit less imposing. i did this and have attached the image. took about 10 minutes or less.

from there, you'll want to lower the opacity quite a bit and set the 'hardness' down to something under 80%. i normally start at 80% and work down the finer the detail i work on. i dont use photoshop, so i dont know exactly what the equivalent tools are called in photoshop, but i know they exist.

you actually dont need a higher resolution scan. you could, and you might get a tiny bit more detail, so that's up to you and what you have available to work with.

when you get down to working on the finer details, it's sometimes a good idea to double the image size within your graphic editor. this gives you more detail in the actual changes you make and avoids things like aliasing (the 'jaggies'). i often do this on smaller images like this.

airbrushing can be very useful also. but, make a new blank layer and do your airbrushing on that and apply it sparingly. then, try a blur --> guasian blur on that layer to make it blend in and smooth out even better.

it's a great picture. your grandmother looks to have been a strong worman.

craig
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  #8  
Old 04-19-2006, 03:09 PM
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Gary Richardson Gary Richardson is offline
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Had a quick go with your picture, mostly just a lot of cloning.

Bit crude, with a better resolution picture and more time you should be able to get it better than this.
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File Type: jpg mattie copy_filtered.jpg (82.1 KB, 88 views)
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  #9  
Old 04-19-2006, 03:22 PM
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Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
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gary,

i like what you did with the background there. what'd you use, a 'stock' backdrop there blended in? looks nice.

craig
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  #10  
Old 04-19-2006, 03:28 PM
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Gary Richardson Gary Richardson is offline
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No Craig, just patched and cloned from the original. (rotated and deformed some of the patches). Had to guess a bit as to what I thought the original was.

Had to add a bit of texture to the final picture to hide the over smoothed areas I'd caused by cloning a bit too soft in places.
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