RetouchPRO

Go Back   RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Restoration
Register Blogs FAQ Site Nav Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Photo Restoration Repairing damaged photos

rescuing flood-damaged colour snapshots

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 07-08-2007, 01:32 AM
M.L. Angoujard M.L. Angoujard is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1
rescuing flood-damaged colour snapshots

Hope someone can help with this -- I have a lot of colour snapshots, some gloss and some matt finish, that were damaged in a flood. They seem to be simply stuck together but there are lots.

I know nothing about how to approach this problem; had thought of steaming them but have no idea whether this would cause more damage. Can anyone help?

Thanks in advance for any advice,
M.L. Angoujard
Reply With Quote top
  #2  
Old 07-08-2007, 03:52 AM
sergio2263's Avatar
sergio2263 sergio2263 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: London
Posts: 612
Smile Re: rescuing flood-damaged colour snapshots

Quote:
Originally Posted by M.L. Angoujard View Post
Hope someone can help with this -- I have a lot of colour snapshots, some gloss and some matt finish, that were damaged in a flood. They seem to be simply stuck together but there are lots.

I know nothing about how to approach this problem; had thought of steaming them but have no idea whether this would cause more damage. Can anyone help?

Thanks in advance for any advice,
M.L. Angoujard

Hi Angoujard

I am sorry about your lost loosing snapshots sometime is like loosing your memories i am afraid the damage you've had with the photos sound to me are behond restoring if the photos are stuck together it will be impossible to praise them apart they would simply tear as for steaming them please dont attempt it you will have more damage than you've already got saying all this if you managed to praise some photos and they are only half torn i've seen people work miracle with very damaged torn photos dont give up keep surfing around perhaps you might get lucky.

cheers

sergio
Reply With Quote top
  #3  
Old 07-08-2007, 04:35 AM
zganie zganie is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Montreal Quebec
Posts: 420
Re: rescuing flood-damaged colour snapshots

Your best bet is either try and find some information on the net or to ask a photograph conservator.


zganie
Reply With Quote top
  #4  
Old 07-08-2007, 05:33 AM
Ziaphra's Avatar
Ziaphra Ziaphra is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 439
Re: rescuing flood-damaged colour snapshots

This link may help...good luck!

http://listserv.muohio.edu/scripts/w...chives&P=13712
Reply With Quote top
  #5  
Old 07-08-2007, 01:19 PM
Craig Walters's Avatar
Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: somewhere over there
Posts: 8,786
Blog Entries: 4
Re: rescuing flood-damaged colour snapshots

welcome to RP, M.L. Angoujard.

take a look at our 'History, Conservation and Repair' forum. there are a number of threads in there about stuck photos. just beware that these are always a bit of a trick and only do the suggested procedures at your own risk. we make no guarantees.

it's also going to make a difference whether the pictures are stuck front to front, front to back or back to back. back to back is relatively easy, since all you're risking is the paper backing and not the image. the other two are more problematic.

the overall theory is that if it was water or water and something in solution in the water that softened things enough to make them stick, then water shld once again soften them enough to separate. but having done some of these myself, i can tell you it's not quite a one to one proposition and always tricky. patience is the key.

this is the technique i use when i have a front to back problem, paper to film.

the tools i use are a large, table stand magnifying glass (you dont want to have to hold the magnifying glass as your hands are going to be occupied), water in an eye dropper, and either an exacto knife or razor blade.

using the magnifying glass, i locate an edge that is not totally stuck together and can be pulled back a tiny bit. into that opening i put a drop of water from the eyedropper and let it soak a minute. then carefully watching under the glass, i will try to peel back the edges from each other until i see the first signs of a tear/rip. i then add another drop of water and let that soak. i just keep repeating that until i get a full separation.

the exacto knife/razor is for when the soaking just wont completely loosen things up. using the knife i very carefully try to make the separation.

i've had some come away without ever having to use the knife and some where i had to. the latter always leaves a little bit of paper from the back of the one stuck to the film of the other. normally, this is small and upon scanning the image i can then fix this in paint shop pro.

i'm sorry to say, i have almost no experience in front to front. i'm tempted to take a couple old photos and stick them together in a muddy solution to see how it might be done, but havent yet.
Reply With Quote top
  #6  
Old 11-02-2007, 09:31 PM
Ibasnazy1 Ibasnazy1 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2
Re: rescuing flood-damaged colour snapshots

This is probably a bit late but here's what I did to some of my 40 year old 35mm military service pictures. I took a stack of 12 (or so) pictures that were totally stuck front to back. I could barely pull the edge up on most of them. I put the stack in the microwave and zapped them on high for about 15 seconds. I was able to separate 3 or 4 of them off the bottom. I put the rest in for another 6-7 seconds and they all came apart with no damage at all. Better yet, the whole thing took less than a minute and I wound up with dry pictures and no curling. Depending on the strength of your microwave, I'd suggest testing this on some not-so-important pictures untill you get an idea how much it will take before they let go. I imagine this is the same principle of being able to soften a piece of dried bread in the microwave. Zap it enough and it's edible. Too much and it turns into a brick. The microwave excites the water molecules which is basically what steaming or soaking does. As with regular food in the microwave, hot spots can form so use caution. Mine were zapped just enough to be able to peel them apart safely. I did hear them as I was peeling them apart but I was using almost no force. I laid them out flat on the kitchen table. Awesome. I didn't think I'd ever see these pictures again.
Reply With Quote top
  #7  
Old 11-04-2007, 11:34 AM
Craig Walters's Avatar
Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: somewhere over there
Posts: 8,786
Blog Entries: 4
Re: rescuing flood-damaged colour snapshots

well, now that is interesting and something i'd never have thought of, a microwave. when i want to soften something hard, like your dried bread example, i normally put a slightly damp paper towel over it. did you do anything like that with your photos or just put them in with nothing? it's an interesting idea. did you notice any cracking of the film surface? i would think that would be a danger there, also.
Reply With Quote top
  #8  
Old 11-04-2007, 01:31 PM
Ibasnazy1 Ibasnazy1 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2
Re: rescuing flood-damaged colour snapshots

I did not put anything in with the photos which I put in film side up. I thought about the wet towel but tried without it first. The photos closer to the bottom came apart first. I let the stack sit for a few seconds to see if the residual heat would work deeper into the stack. I probably could have peeled 1 or 2 more off but since the initial zap caused a few to loosen up, I zapped the stack a little more and then let them sit before pulling them apart. I never actually took my hand off the door handle. My microwave is not a high powered one. All pictures came out totally intact. There were no rips, tears, cracking or loose film in the picture surface. I let them sit on the table overnight and they looked just fine. I packaged them up, came back last night and thumbed through them to see if they were going to stick back again but they didn't. Everything has been great since.

BTW, I had initially stored these photos flat on top of each other such that the bottom photos were under the weight of all the photos above them. When I put them back in storage, I'll probably store them single layer on edge (or slanted).

Last edited by Ibasnazy1; 11-04-2007 at 01:49 PM.
Reply With Quote top
  #9  
Old 11-04-2007, 05:10 PM
Craig Walters's Avatar
Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: somewhere over there
Posts: 8,786
Blog Entries: 4
Re: rescuing flood-damaged colour snapshots

well, like i said, would never have thought of that, but well done!
Reply With Quote top
  #10  
Old 11-06-2007, 05:43 AM
Nicholas Cole Nicholas Cole is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 3
Re: rescuing flood-damaged colour snapshots

Great idea. I'll have to try this too.
My question. Are these paper based prints or plastic from the 60's to present?

Here is a stock letter I post in my community on line forum when ever I see of someone who has suffered a fire. People throw away images thinking there is nothing that can be done with their wet and or burned photos. It is up to us to educate them that their vehicles to rekindle memories can be salvaged.

You may change the name on the bottom of this and use it however you wish. I hope it can help someone else.

I'm so sorry to hear of another fire. Please read the following and let me know if I can help you - beyond prayers for your family.

The loss of most items can be replaced at the local store, but the loss of old photos can't be replaced.

The damage can look much worse than it really is for the photos in albums and those still in the envelopes from the store.

Photos are made of plastic on two sides of thin paper and the last step before drying and cutting for you to take home is a water wash to remove the developing chemicals. ( some new developers use a chemical to save water)

The packets of photos in the drawer might be wet from the fire hoses and look burned but many times the plastic has melted on the edges and the person in the photo is in the center of the picture and is still in good shape.

Take what looks like a total loss and put them into a plastic bag and seal it so the photos wont dry out.

The photos might be stuck together but try to peal them apart. You will be surprised of how many pictures you can save up to several weeks after they got wet.

You can always cut away the burned and wrinkled part of the photo and save the middle, the part that has the children's first birthday or the pictures of the grand parents or others who might not still be with us.

Don't worry about trying to separate them in a tub of water or under running water and laying them out to dry by themselves. After all, you were about to throw away your family's visual history anyway.

It's worth saving these memories. PHOTOS ARE VEHICLES TO REKINDLE MEMORIES!!!!!

I would be happy to help you save some of those memories or show you how easy it can be, (sometimes) .
Collect all the photos wet, dry, burned edges, smoked glass, burned on the edges.

KEEP THE WET ONES WET.

Call in the family and have a "save the photos gathering". You can all share in the re-discovery of the special memories of your family history and this time you can write dates and names on the back.

Please call me if I can be of any help in any way.

Nicholas Cole - Photographer 770-443-7355
HTTP://WWW.NicholasColePhotographer.com/Copy.html
Reply With Quote top
Reply

  RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Restoration


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
PC/Win Plug for colour cast Stroker Photoshop Help 6 05-06-2005 09:55 PM
Ignore Exif and Elements colour management Susan S. Hidden Power Support 18 08-26-2004 07:17 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright © 2016 Doug Nelson. All Rights Reserved