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Photo Restoration Repairing damaged photos

crazing problem

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  #1  
Old 08-03-2007, 10:17 PM
andihazelwood andihazelwood is offline
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crazing problem

Greetings all,

I've been a lurker at RetouchPro for some time now and am hugely impressed by the work done by the members here- you really know your stuff! I'm hoping you can help me on a project...

I'm working on a photo restoration for a friend- the original portrait is an 8x6, on heavy card, taken probably 30 years ago. I've scanned it at 1200dpi. The links here are to half sized crops out of the full sized image. (The crops are 854x647, 150kb each)

In addition to the usual scratches and dings, it has a very difficult crazing or alligatoring, that is in many cases sharper than the details of the image itself- which makes it hard to get rid of with Neat Image or any of the PS filters- at least, I'm having trouble with my limited knowledge! Can anybody give any ideas?

http://ameralia.net/images/harveybefore.jpg
Here's a half sized crop from the original image.

http://ameralia.net/images/harveyafter.jpg
Here's my retouch, so far- just ran dust and scratches (3 pix, 11 threshhold) and clone stamped the heck out of it to get rid of the other imperfections. Now all that is left to deal with is the crazing. Well, and the colour, but that's a whole 'nother ball of wax.... gotta figure out how to make her a blue eyed browny/redhead instead of all pink!!

Thanks in advance for any tips you can provide on this crazing thing- cheers!

Andi
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  #2  
Old 08-03-2007, 10:58 PM
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mistermonday mistermonday is offline
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Re: crazing problem

Andi, the texturing is irregularly shaped and well defined, so noise filters and FFTs will not be too successful. If you have Photoshop CSor later, you might want to try Filter > Blur > Surface Blur. There will be a trade off between texture and blurring the image, but it can certainly mitigate the texture to some extent. The sample below used a small amount of Surface Blur (4).
Regards, Murray
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File Type: jpg Andihazelwood harveyafter MM.jpg (67.3 KB, 90 views)
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  #3  
Old 08-03-2007, 11:29 PM
andihazelwood andihazelwood is offline
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Re: crazing problem

Thanks for that Murray! Playing with the settings for surface blue now. It really is a trade off, isn't it...
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  #4  
Old 08-04-2007, 01:24 AM
Charlene5 Charlene5 is offline
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Re: crazing problem

I feel a bit sheepish offering advice being so very new to this, but I had the same problem with a similarly mounted photo. I did up a small portion below the eye and toward the temple. I spent less than five minutes and there's no color correction or anything else done. I wanted to get this posted before I fall snoring in the keyboard

I used an absolutely normal spot healing brush - about an 8 I think - and cleaned up the cracks. It really works a treat for that alligator look. Use short strokes and work in the direction of the crack.

I went over that with with Katrin Eismann's Barbie Skin. In her book she prescribes it for touching up zits but it works for all kinds of eyesores. This is the recipe. I've copy/pasted it from Beth's post because I'm to old and silly to figure out how to link to it:

File > New
64 x 64 pixels large
Edit > Fill > 50% Gray
Filter > Artistic > Film Grain
Grain Setting of 1
Highlight 0
Intensity of 5
Select > All
Edit > Define Pattern (like, um... 'skin')

Now, open your photo

Ctrl J to duplicate layer

Activate the Healing Brush and set the Source to Pattern
and choose the Screen Blending Mode (brush) and select the film grain pattern you just created.

Use a large brush and paint over all the skin (or anything else).... overdo it. Reduce layer opacity to apprx. 75%.

Ctrl J this retouched layer, change Healing Brush to Multiply Blend mode and use the same pattern to refine the areas.

In this case I used a Dissolve layer set at around 75% opacity. It looked better (to my eye) than the normal mode. I didn't put in the multiply layer. What you're seeing is the screen mode only. I'm sure it would improve with that step.

With some color correcting and refining I think it could look real nice.

Off to bed!!

MJ
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File Type: jpg harveyafterbarbie skin.jpg (137.3 KB, 107 views)
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  #5  
Old 08-04-2007, 07:26 AM
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irshgrlkc irshgrlkc is offline
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Re: crazing problem

What I like to do when I have a really noisy picture like this is to have several layers that I have applied varying levels of noise reduction to (low to high) with layer masks on them. I then go and paint out the noise where I want it. For broad areas, like her forehead, I would use the stronger noise removal layer, her eyes, a softer noise removal.

I used Neat Image to create my noise removal layers. Once I had quickly painted out the unwanted lines, I then dodged and burned to bring out some of the muddy details, finally ran a high pass sharpening layer.

Sorry if this is jumbled, I am way overdue for some sleep. Anywho, this is a really quick, sloppy attempt.
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File Type: jpg quick.jpg (186.1 KB, 80 views)
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  #6  
Old 08-04-2007, 08:16 AM
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Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
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Re: crazing problem

ok, here's a 'quck fix'. this is not the best of all possible fixes, but it is pretty fast and might make a good 'first step'.

attached is a screenshot of the work. notice that there's only three layers, the background and two others (background is on the bottom in Paint Shop Pro). the next layer up, i used the 'move' tool and moved the image slight up and right a few pixels and set the blend mode to 'darken'.

on the top layer, i duplicated the background again (NOT the 2nd layer) and this time moved the image down and to the left a few pixels, effectively putting it back where it was in the BG layer. i set this layer to blend mode 'darken' also.

and that's it.

you can also experiment with other blend modes. lighten seemed to work somewhat on the 3rd layer, but not quite as well as darken.

i dont recommend this procedure as a cure-all. but it does keep the image integrity pretty well and reduces a lot of the work for this type of damage.
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File Type: jpg alligatoring-1-k-1b.jpg (193.5 KB, 86 views)
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  #7  
Old 08-04-2007, 10:57 AM
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Daviskw Daviskw is offline
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Re: crazing problem

Hi there

Below is an honest 2 minute job…lol and it looks like it but it is sooo easy.

Duplicate the background

Group a blank layer above and to the duplicate… fill with 50 percent gray… apply the texturizer and use sandstone. Then to this same layer apply plastic wrap. The idea here is to try and match somewhat the existing grain of the picture.

Change texture layer to overlay.

Click on the working duplicate layer and apply the median filter until the cracks disappear.

Make a snapshot of this layer.

Click on the snap shot to make it active then in history click just before the median was applied. Cracks are back... but just for a little while.

Use your history brush either large or small... normal , darken or lighten... to remove clacks. The new texture is applied over your changes.

Butch
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File Type: jpg TB0202-02.jpg (95.5 KB, 134 views)

Last edited by Daviskw; 08-04-2007 at 11:42 AM.
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  #8  
Old 08-04-2007, 02:39 PM
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chillin chillin is offline
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Re: crazing problem

-Cut & paste, very little cloning.
-Hue, Saturation & level adjustment selectively.
-Spot healing.
I tried to keep the same pattern.
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File Type: jpg harveybefore_chill.jpg (199.3 KB, 66 views)
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  #9  
Old 08-04-2007, 03:54 PM
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philbach philbach is offline
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Re: crazing problem

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daviskw View Post
Hi there

Below is an honest 2 minute job…lol and it looks like it but it is sooo easy.

Duplicate the background

Group a blank layer above and to the duplicate… fill with 50 percent gray… apply the texturizer and use sandstone. Then to this same layer apply plastic wrap. The idea here is to try and match somewhat the existing grain of the picture.

Change texture layer to overlay.

Click on the working duplicate layer and apply the median filter until the cracks disappear.

Make a snapshot of this layer.

Click on the snap shot to make it active then in history click just before the median was applied. Cracks are back... but just for a little while.

Use your history brush either large or small... normal , darken or lighten... to remove clacks. The new texture is applied over your changes.

Butch
Hey great method and thanks for sharing it.
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  #10  
Old 08-04-2007, 05:16 PM
andihazelwood andihazelwood is offline
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Re: crazing problem

Morning all! (it's 8am Sunday here in Australia! ) Wow, so many great techniques!

Charlene, I've seen mention of Eismann's book several times here, I can see I'm going to have to pick it up- I really like the look of what you did, though over the entire image it might be pretty time consuming! That won't stop me from giving it a try though

irshgrlkc, I have tried with Neat Image a few different ways and can never get the cracks to disappear completely as you have done in some areas. Are you also cloning or healing?

Kraellin at first glance I thought your method wouldn't work very well for this project but I see now that if I do it on the "after" version I posted it could work very well for removing the cracks over large expanses (in the full size original her arm, neck, etc would be perfect for this!)

Daviskw, your method looks great. And I think that once the image is resized to its original size of 8x6 it'll look quite good! I worry about losing detail in her hair, but with as strong as the defects are comared to the actual details, I'm gonna have to live with that I think!

chillin, I'll definitely keep that method in my back pocket for next time.

Cheers all! Feel free to keep offering other suggestions, she isn't expecting this back for a week or so

Andi
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