RetouchPRO

Go Back   RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Restoration
Register Blogs FAQ Site Nav Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Photo Restoration Repairing damaged photos

Sepia or B&W

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 09-26-2007, 01:55 PM
BenHardy BenHardy is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Cambridge UK
Posts: 23
Sepia or B&W

Many old photos turn brown with age (see attached) and I notice on some of the help you guys offer, your repaired examples have been changed to B&W. So how does one determine whether the original was sepia or just aged. Furthermore, if a sepia print is required at the end of the process would you convert to B&W first, then repair and then tone back to sepia at the end?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Boy in Hat Rest.jpg (97.8 KB, 48 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #2  
Old 09-26-2007, 03:17 PM
lurch's Avatar
lurch lurch is offline
Senior Member
Patron
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: SoCal
Posts: 574
Re: Sepia or B&W

Quote:
So how does one determine whether the original was sepia or just aged.
Good question, worth some historical research. I've always just assumed that the original was most likely to be black and white, but could be very wrong.
Quote:
Furthermore, if a sepia print is required at the end of the process would you convert to B&W first, then repair and then tone back to sepia at the end?
Yes. And to get a proper sepia tone, see http://retouchpro.com/tutorials/?m=show&id=8

<C>
Reply With Quote top
  #3  
Old 09-26-2007, 03:28 PM
zekeode zekeode is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Finland
Posts: 76
Re: Sepia or B&W

I know this is not the answer you are looking, but...

I would not limit "finishing touch" to B&W or sepia. Try different color tones and see what fits the best.
Reply With Quote top
  #4  
Old 09-26-2007, 03:58 PM
BenHardy BenHardy is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Cambridge UK
Posts: 23
Re: Sepia or B&W

Thankyou.
BTW, this is an excellent and most instructive site. Now that I'm starting to get a few techniques under my belt I'll help where I can.
Ben
Reply With Quote top
  #5  
Old 09-26-2007, 04:40 PM
mistermonday's Avatar
mistermonday mistermonday is offline
Moderator
Patron
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 3,028
Re: Sepia or B&W

Depending on when the photo was taken, B&W may have been the state of the original. Most of these Sepia looking prints started out as black & white and were toned with a chemical process after developing.
Whether you restore with the color or b&w version often depends on the condition. Some stains & damage are easier to clean up if the image is converted to B&W and then given a sepia or monotone or duotone afterward. Some folks prefer the end result in B&W, while others like the warmer tone.

A good place to start is to adjust the contrast with a Levels or Curve adjustment at the begining to see what you have to work with.
In the sample below:
1. A level adjustment performed on each of the channels separately to pull out as much detail as is left in the image. The result is closer to black & white but not as yellow. Perhaps this may be closer to the original without the effects of more yeloowing with age.
2. This levels adjusted layer placed above the orig background layer with the blend mode set to luminosity. This gives you the original color but with increased contrast.
3. The level adjusted image converted to B&W using the new B&W Adjustment layer in PS CS3.

You can select whichever image makes it easier from here to clone and heal and patch it up.

Regards, Murray
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Levels Only.jpg (154.8 KB, 21 views)
File Type: jpg Levels+Luminosity.jpg (161.3 KB, 22 views)
File Type: jpg Levels+Black-White.jpg (94.4 KB, 31 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #6  
Old 09-26-2007, 05:01 PM
maureeno maureeno is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 214
Re: Sepia or B&W

Quote:
Originally Posted by BenHardy View Post
Many old photos turn brown with age (see attached) and I notice on some of the help you guys offer, your repaired examples have been changed to B&W. So how does one determine whether the original was sepia or just aged. Furthermore, if a sepia print is required at the end of the process would you convert to B&W first, then repair and then tone back to sepia at the end?


I have some from that time period and they are clearly sepia. If that helps. I reiterate--mine are clearly sepia.

Maureen
Reply With Quote top
  #7  
Old 09-26-2007, 05:48 PM
BenHardy BenHardy is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Cambridge UK
Posts: 23
Re: Sepia or B&W

Thanks Murray
I didn't realise that you could perform a Levels adj. on each separate channel.
I assume you did a manual levels adj. since I just tried autolevels on each channel and ended up with a far darker result
Reply With Quote top
  #8  
Old 09-26-2007, 05:49 PM
BenHardy BenHardy is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Cambridge UK
Posts: 23
Re: Sepia or B&W

Maureeno
How do you know?
Reply With Quote top
  #9  
Old 09-26-2007, 06:28 PM
Dave.Cox's Avatar
Dave.Cox Dave.Cox is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: GrandPrairie.TX
Posts: 536
Re: Sepia or B&W

As Murray indicated, many photos originally printed in sepia, as well as B&W. These weren't the only dual tone choices however. another fairly common one was to add a blue tint, especially if you wanted to make the photo look colder. Getting the photo electronically such as via the site here makes it hard to determine if the original image was sepia, or has just yellowed with age. Still, of ten the best way to clean up a photo is to take it back to B&W, and then colorize it as desired. The method Murray describes is a good one. another one that I often find helpful is the channel mixer set to monochrome. It will allow you to mix the better channels and reduce a damaged channel. Checking the monochrome box leave the result as B&W.
Reply With Quote top
  #10  
Old 09-26-2007, 08:32 PM
mistermonday's Avatar
mistermonday mistermonday is offline
Moderator
Patron
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 3,028
Re: Sepia or B&W

Ben, yes the Level adj was manual. Select each channel from the pull down menu in the Levels dialog box, and compress the histogram. In the case of this image, the image data was all clustered at one end of the curve in each channel. Auto can accomplish the same thing for you if you select the correct option. In the levels dialog box you can click on the options buttons and find 3 Auto options, one of which is to adjust the levels of each channel separately. However, that is not always perfect so I prefer to do it manually as it only takes a few seconds and I can preview exactly how it will look.
Regards, Murray
Reply With Quote top
Reply

  RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Restoration


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
b&w or sepia D Thompson Critiques 7 01-21-2007 11:08 AM
2 questions.....one about sepia and one about prescanning correction Fazools Photo Restoration 4 03-30-2006 08:08 PM
Updated Actions for B&W Toning gmitchel Photo Restoration 1 11-20-2005 12:24 AM
Free B&W Toning action set gmitchel Photo Restoration 3 10-20-2005 09:56 AM
Is there a misconception about Sepia??? tubeamp Photo Restoration 11 07-12-2004 11:08 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:17 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright © 2016 Doug Nelson. All Rights Reserved