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Photo Restoration Repairing damaged photos

Scanning

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  #11  
Old 03-22-2008, 07:42 AM
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skydog skydog is offline
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Re: Scanning

I have ALOT of old slides and 35mm film I would like to scan, but I have yet broken down and bought a scanner. I'd like to scan to obtain good quality photos for myself and the family - probably 8x10 max. I however am not impressed with the quality posted above: http://free-du.t-com.hr/dnac/hdrfrome6.jpg. Is this as good as it gets? I see fine vertical lines that look like the film..is this from the scan or part of the original photo? For some time I have been looking at: Nikon CoolScan VED and Epson V750. I'm willing to pay around $700 but I don't want to go much higher. Since I don't have experience with either scanner I keep debating which one would serve me the best. The Cool Scan may provide better quality. The Epson, on the other hand, could be used as a film/slide scanner as well as a regular scanner. Would I really see a difference in quality for my use? Can I expect more than the scans above or is that as good as it gets and I am expecting too much?
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  #12  
Old 03-22-2008, 12:55 PM
One4UAll One4UAll is offline
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Re: Scanning

First, go to http://www.scantips.com. There, you'll find out why a color print scan requires no more than 300 dpi. Second, go to http://groups.google.com/grphp?hl=en&tab=wg&q=, which is a newsgroup discussing scanners, and where you can post your own questions. Third, realize scanning is not a simple matter, and if you're not willing to spend the time to learn to do it yourself, then take your photos/film to a local service.

[This was not aimed at skydog, but at the entire discussion. Skydog: I scanned many 35-mm slides & negs on my Epson 4870 flatbed scanner with results that satisfied me. The 4870 is an earlier model of Epson's flatbed scanners. I don't think you can go wrong in investing in the Epson V750, and you can scan an entire roll of 36-frame 35-mm film or 8 mounted slides at a time, as well as capability in scanning prints and documents.

Significantly, Epson incorporates ICE technology, which reduces/eliminates dust spots, etc., at the scan. Epson's software, EpsonScan, is easy to use; just use the "professional" mode. Unless you are sophisticated in scanning and want a variety of effects, I don't believe you need VueScan, not that I have anything against it.]

Last edited by One4UAll; 03-22-2008 at 01:25 PM.
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  #13  
Old 03-22-2008, 01:04 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Re: Scanning

Zganie,

Let me add the excellent reviews at photo-i in the U.K. on relatively inexpensive but capable scanners here . The reviews refer back and compare to results with other scanners so it's useful to get a good idea. I introduced Vincent to Vuescan! Now he's a fan of the program. It's truly a very rich piece of software at a good price.

The reference to http://free-du.t-com.hr/dnac/hdrfrome6.jpg seems to use as an example a poorly exposed image to show how an image can indeed be extracted even with such a poor slide.

Asher
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  #14  
Old 03-22-2008, 01:29 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Re: Scanning

Quote:
Originally Posted by One4UAll View Post
First, go to http://www.scantips.com. There, you'll find out why a color print scan requires no more than 300 dpi. Second, go to http://groups.google.com/grphp?hl=en&tab=wg&q=, which is a newsgroup discussing scanners, and where you can post your own questions. Third, realize scanning is not a simple matter, and if you're not willing to spend the time to learn to do it yourself, then take your photos/film to a local service.
One4All,

The news group link is helpful, no it's excellent for questions!

Let me re-address this 300 dpi figure. The discussion suggest that sometimes 400 dpi might be worthwhile. If the image is perfect, then go ahead with 300 dpi. However, if there's spotting needed, then 600 dpi which is very modest and then reducing after correction is much better as it better hides any corrections.

Further for excellent fine B&W pictures and some Polaroids, there can be as more obtainable detail gathered that way. I don't have a religious attitude to 300 dpi and it's pointless to do so. After all, the scanners all have far greater optical resolution. These scanners generally have optical resolutions beyond 1200 and up to 3000 to 4000, so to fixate on the 300 pixel advice is not needed.

Zganie,

just try 300 dpi versus 600 dpi, and compare for detail. Then repair scratches and spots and reduce the 600 dpi to 300 dpi and compare again. If there's no advantage, then 300 dpi is fine for your work!

Better just read the reviews on Vincents British site. One review will suffice tune your brain to what's possible. Then you will have very few questions beyond where you get the money from and the best price!

Asher
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  #15  
Old 03-22-2008, 02:30 PM
One4UAll One4UAll is offline
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Re: Scanning

Asher, thanks for your response and information. Re: the 300 dpi figure, you're right: it depends on what you want to do with the print's file. If it's going to be post-processed, then the more pixels, the better, but up to a point (600 dpi) as you suggest.
We're talking about a color or b/w *print*, not film.

On the other hand, with film, I scanned all my valued 35-mm, 645, and 6x6 images at the highest resolution and at 16-bit depth. Huge files. But, as you point out, I have all the info I need & I can go from there.

The other consideration is file size, which involves trade-offs, esp.re: one's system's capability. I decided, when scanning my negs & slides, that some were "family" (low res., low file size) and some were worth pursuing to print for public viewing (high res., high file size).

I suppose I'm preaching to the choir, here, but it seems to me that there are many people like me accessing this Website who want to process treasured images themselves, maybe as a hobby, maybe for profit, or a combination.

Scanning is a serious business. Do it well, or don't do it at all.
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  #16  
Old 03-31-2008, 02:53 PM
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janie janie is offline
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Re: Scanning

I have been scanning old black and whites. I tried at 300, 600 & 1200. For retouching purposes in this case, the 300 works fine. I didn't see a huge difference between the three, more vivid at 1200. I used 600 for pictures that had more damage, as they were then easier to work with in PS.

Since I'm not a professional, I just use an HP printer/scanner.
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