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Photo Restoration Repairing damaged photos

Scanning

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  #1  
Old 03-21-2008, 06:44 AM
zganie zganie is offline
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Scanning

I see a lot of people here having trouble with there photos.The thing is your Scanner is like a copy camera.Originally when restoring photos they used a camera instead of a scanner which was specifically set up to do copywork,now Scanners are used.SO whats the point you ask? Learn how to use your Scanner,its not just push the button and we do the rest deal,its like taking a photo you have to capture the detail.Without that your causing yourself a lot of grief.
what say you
zganie
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  #2  
Old 03-21-2008, 12:28 PM
esac esac is offline
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Re: Scanning

Your post is wonderful, however its like saying 'hey lets solve world hunger'. Without telling anyone HOW to do so, we are all just going to sit around in our PJs and feel bad that there are hungry people in the world while we munch on our sausage egg and cheese mcmuffin ... mmmmmmmmmmm

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  #3  
Old 03-21-2008, 01:05 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Smile Re: Scanning

Quote:
Originally Posted by esac View Post
Your post is wonderful, however its like saying 'hey lets solve world hunger'. Without telling anyone HOW to do so, we are all just going to sit around in our PJs and feel bad that there are hungry people in the world while we munch on our sausage egg and cheese mcmuffin ... mmmmmmmmmmm

Excellent challenge Zganie & Esac,

O.K., here's a start. (For sure there's more on retouchpro if one searches!)

There is not much fine resolution in most modern prints. An antique print might, paradoxically be better as some of them were hand made platinum prints with the highest technic.

For restoration of a damaged photograph, 600 dpi on a $300-600 flatbed scanner is probably all that's needed. One could use Vuescan and scan for highlights and shadows and then combine.

Just as well, one can take stack the picture flat on a non wall in a non colored room and wearing non colored clothes, use one's digital camera on a tripod to take a picture. Here one can easily bracket or even take the picture in sections and stitch if the picture is to large for a scanner.

Film, however, should be scanned at a higher resolution. The smaller the film is, the more there is need for a better scanner. The figures of 48 BIT A/D convertors and Optical Densities of 4.0 are nonsense for anything below $5,000. However one can get 2.4-3.4 quite readily spending $150 to $700 on an Epson scanner.

One issue is that the stepping motors are not so perfect and the mirror system induces artifacts so the idealized marketing promises are not reached. Nevertheless, an Epson 700/750 Pro scanner, with the a liquid mount, can achieve remarkable results.

For higher end work buy and Imacon or send the particular precious film for a high resolution drum scan to a professional lab. The cost is really trivial for a high end job that is beyond the Epson scanner. The Microtek M1 although great is perhaps not yet a reliable and known to beat out the Epson.

Asher
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  #4  
Old 03-21-2008, 01:31 PM
esac esac is offline
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Re: Scanning

I'll try the suggestion of VueScan, highlights and shadows and combining. However your post really is "spend more money". I researched and begged my wife for an epson perfection v700, however $500 for a scanner just wasn't going to fly. So I settled on the HP G4050 as it generally received good reviews from users and reviewers alike.

Why 600dpi? Everywhere I read tells me that unless I am going to blow the size of the picture up to poster size, 300 or even 200dpi is all that is needed. I will try a 300 vs 600 and see if my restoration in photoshop comes out better out of curiosity.

Any other tips using the POSS (piece of shit scanner) that I currently have?
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  #5  
Old 03-21-2008, 01:33 PM
esac esac is offline
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Re: Scanning

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Excellent challenge Zganie & Esac,


Film, however, should be scanned at a higher resolution. The smaller the film is, the more there is need for a better scanner. The figures of 48 BIT A/D convertors and Optical Densities of 4.0 are nonsense for anything below $5,000. However one can get 2.4-3.4 quite readily spending $150 to $700 on an Epson scanner.

Asher

What do you mean by "scanned at a higher resolution". Does dpi/ppi = higher resolution?
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  #6  
Old 03-21-2008, 01:59 PM
esac esac is offline
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Re: Scanning

I tried vuescan and I see no options for 'scanning highlights' or 'scanning shadows'. Where would I find this at ?
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  #7  
Old 03-21-2008, 02:39 PM
pixelzombie pixelzombie is offline
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Re: Scanning

unless you are scanning for a film recorder, 600 PPI is overkill...
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  #8  
Old 03-21-2008, 07:48 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Re: Scanning

Zganie,

You don't need to spend a lot of money but you do get better results if you can spend a tad more. I suggested a sscanner the price range is $150-$700. Actually you could even could be O.K. with a $70 scanner used well. If you do 5 scans and stack them in various software, you can get rid of noise. Vuesscan will allow you to do that I believe. When I gave the figure of 600 dpi, this is the generally accepted upper limit of possible information on a fantastic print that could be collected. I said this so that you would not be seduced by print scanners claiming high resolution capability. If the scanner can do 600 dpi its great for scanning and all you need for prints or for 8x10 film. Afterwards you can spot for dirt etc then reduce the size to 300 dpi using Image Image-Size-Bicubic Sharper and dump noise on the way!

A small piece of film will need to be scanned at a higher resolution as there is far more detail there. Generally you might be working from a 35mm strip of film, which is likely smaller than the final image output you will need. In "scan tips" you'll be guided to the resolution you'll need depending on the output.

So if you have 35mm film, you may need to scan at 1200 to 3,000 dpi depending on the output you want to get. If you are going to deliver a 16x20 image to be printed at 200 dpi, you'll need to scan at roughly 16x200=3200 dpi. If however you had a 4x5 piece of film then 4x200=800dpi would be sufficient!

So if your scanner is limited, try to get a bigger peice of film if possible.

Go to the hamrick.com site and you will find all you need. The next site to have bookmarked is the relarted website http://www.scantips.com/

For example the choice of 300 dpi that others suggest is discussed here while setting black and white points is covered here .

To expand dynamic range extracting shadows and highlights you can use Vuescans multiple exposure feature discussed for example here.

How good can things get check this out http://free-du.t-com.hr/dnac/hdrfrome6.jpg

Good luck,

Asher
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  #9  
Old 03-22-2008, 04:40 AM
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palms palms is offline
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Re: Scanning

Interesting and well needed post, could someone give a scanning for dummies sort of tut
I mean I use my scanner maybe once or twice a year dont really like the results i get from scanned photo's (not vintage or old ones)
Someone done a post a while ago who explained to me the need to turn the sharpenning off but as for the rest still not sure on the best way to go
As for the sort and cost mine is a all in printer one etc
Things that may be of interest are
which is the best dpi to scan at, is it the same for all images?
then what is the different between the settings (colour documents, colour photo's etc etc)

so come on can anybody make me like my scanner

Palms
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  #10  
Old 03-22-2008, 06:21 AM
zganie zganie is offline
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Re: Scanning

First, Esac I did not write how to do it because if you scroll down this discussion you will see,Asher Kelman,gave an excellent sites scantips.com
also notice that there is a lot of info there to much to put here and discuss

second Asher Kelman,gave some greatips and sites thanks,I do not think you have to spend a lot of money either.
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