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Photo Restoration Repairing damaged photos

Textured photo

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  #11  
Old 05-08-2002, 03:17 PM
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JimNorwood JimNorwood is offline
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Sorry. This is probably more viewable.
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File Type: jpg ~lwf0000.jpg (10.4 KB, 40 views)
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  #12  
Old 05-08-2002, 03:32 PM
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DJ Dubovsky DJ Dubovsky is offline
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Looks like you got any grain texture out. Don't know how bad it was before but your finished product looks real good Jim.
DJ
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  #13  
Old 05-08-2002, 04:13 PM
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DannyRaphael DannyRaphael is offline
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A quick swipe

Don't know if you posted the pic as a "here it is... help me lose a little more grain" or your final result, which looks very good.

I took your pic, enlarged it to 7x7 and ran a combination of native PS filters** on it to lose some grain / texture that was magnified when I resized it.

** Filters used:
- Smart blur
- Added a little noise
- Median
- Dust & scratches
- A touch of unsharp mask
- Curves to bring out some contrast

Very cute baby...
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File Type: jpg baby-face4.jpg (32.3 KB, 39 views)
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  #14  
Old 05-08-2002, 04:24 PM
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JimNorwood JimNorwood is offline
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Danny
I posted it as the original scan. I am still working on resolution. By trying to keep the file under 100k for posting, I obviously did not get a very good rendition. What should my resolution be to get a file similar to yours.

Jim
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  #15  
Old 05-08-2002, 04:35 PM
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DannyRaphael DannyRaphael is offline
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Hi Jim...

Resolution is gonna depend on final destination of the image: If you're going to send it via e-mail or post on the web, 72 ppi is pretty standard. Higher doesn't buy you much, if any, additional quality + makes theimage file bigger = longer to download.

If you intend to print at 5x7, I personally go for a minimum of 300 ppi for photo prints, but you'll get varying opinions all over the board on that number.

Does this help?
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  #16  
Old 05-08-2002, 06:47 PM
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Ed_L Ed_L is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by DannyRaphael
Hi Jim...

Resolution is gonna depend on final destination of the image: If you're going to send it via e-mail or post on the web, 72 ppi is pretty standard. Higher doesn't buy you much, if any, additional quality + makes theimage file bigger = longer to download.

If you intend to print at 5x7, I personally go for a minimum of 300 ppi for photo prints, but you'll get varying opinions all over the board on that number.

Does this help?
The way I understood it is that the file size is dependent of the number of pixels in the image. For example, a 1200 X 1500 pixel image will make the same file size whether it is 72 ppi or 300 ppi. Am I wrong about this?

Ed
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  #17  
Old 05-08-2002, 10:55 PM
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DannyRaphael DannyRaphael is offline
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Hi Ed:

What you stated is correct. My wording wasn't very good.

Although I've fallen asleep many times trying to absorb lengthly tutorials and chapters on deciphering / understanding the differences between "monitor resolution," "printer resolution" and file "resolution," I still get these scrambled most of the time.

Where's a good margarita when you really need one?

What I was attempting to convey is that if a 5"x7" image is to be displayed on the web or sent by e-mail, a file resolution of 72 ppi is sufficient. A higher resolution makes the file bigger, as you stated, but does not yield better image quality on a monitor.

If I intend to print a 5"x7" to 8"x10" image on my more-or-less standard HP ink-jet printer, I've found that a fiile resolution in the range of 200-300 PPI generates high (enough) quality results. Less than that (on my printer, anyway) yields noticeable pixelation for prints in that size range.

Danny
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