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Photo Restoration Repairing damaged photos

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  #11  
Old 10-22-2008, 11:58 PM
0lBaldy's Avatar
0lBaldy 0lBaldy is offline
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Re: Old picture

Thanks Craig.. Took me a little longer than it did Bruce maybe 45 minuets...

BTW... welcome to RetouchPRO Bruce I hope you will make many new friends here!

Way to go by jumping in with your first post being an excellent example of how a Restore should look! Good work!

Looking forward to many more posts from you!
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  #12  
Old 10-23-2008, 09:50 AM
EJG EJG is offline
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Re: Old picture

Thanks again everyone.

This is addictive, I've learnt how to remove stratches using clone and blur - not sure if that is the best method.

I've also had a go at altering the colour and brightness as a lot of my photo's have a red tinge over them.

When restoring a photo, what order should you do things? Should you alter the light and colour first before using the clone/blur tools to correct stratches etc.

I will post some pics of my first attempt soon.
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  #13  
Old 10-23-2008, 11:46 AM
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TommyO TommyO is offline
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Re: Old picture

Quote:
Originally Posted by EJG View Post
When restoring a photo, what order should you do things? Should you alter the light and colour first before using the clone/blur tools to correct stratches etc.
Everyone has their own workflow based upon their past experiences and finding what works best for particular images. However, a widely accepted order is to do most of the color correction (whether it be levels, curves, etc) first. This allows the other tools to work better, as they are interpreting adjacent pixels as they will be, not as they might be. We all make additional tweaks later, that's normal. For example, many times you may go back to a curves layer to make a small tweak. If you have done your color correction after that layer, you will get very unexpected changes to color from the curves layer tweak.
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  #14  
Old 10-23-2008, 04:18 PM
Nan Nan is offline
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Re: Old picture

I've spent time on this one because it has all the kinds of damage I need practice with. Still trying to get the colors right but my question is, how do you deal with the dark, almost black shadows that I have circled? I know that sometimes there's a little more detail in there but how and how much do you lighten those areas up and how do you make it look natural?
I'm using PSP X
Nan
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Kids sm.jpg (96.4 KB, 48 views)
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  #15  
Old 10-23-2008, 04:42 PM
Bruce McLeester Bruce McLeester is offline
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Re: Old picture

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nan View Post
I've spent time on this one because it has all the kinds of damage I need practice with. Still trying to get the colors right but my question is, how do you deal with the dark, almost black shadows that I have circled? I know that sometimes there's a little more detail in there but how and how much do you lighten those areas up and how do you make it look natural?
I'm using PSP X
Nan
Several approaches to this. The easiest is to use photoshops dodge tool which works really well on the hair areas, not so well on the darkest parts like under the neck as you can see on this sample I'm including.
A method that would work better for those would be to do a curves layer and pull down just the black channel, letting the detail in the other channels show through.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Kids-sm-dodge1.jpg (60.0 KB, 39 views)
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  #16  
Old 10-24-2008, 01:51 PM
Nan Nan is offline
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Re: Old picture

Thanks Bruce. Will give it a try.
Nan
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  #17  
Old 10-25-2008, 10:27 PM
deronel859 deronel859 is offline
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Re: Old picture

Thank you so much for the great idea, of photographing old photos rather than scanning them! I have many hundreds of prints to digitize and this sounds like a great way to do it.

I also have the negatives of the prints; would it be better yet to scan the negatives? I don't have a negative scanner, but am open to buying one. Still, considering how small a negative is, it is hard to see how scanning it could produce a good image. Wondered if you have used a negative scanner, and what you think of it.

Thanks, Dottie (new member)
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  #18  
Old 10-27-2008, 12:03 PM
Bruce McLeester Bruce McLeester is offline
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Smile Re: Old picture

Quote:
Originally Posted by deronel859 View Post
Thank you so much for the great idea, of photographing old photos rather than scanning them! I have many hundreds of prints to digitize and this sounds like a great way to do it.

I also have the negatives of the prints; would it be better yet to scan the negatives? I don't have a negative scanner, but am open to buying one. Still, considering how small a negative is, it is hard to see how scanning it could produce a good image. Wondered if you have used a negative scanner, and what you think of it.

Thanks, Dottie (new member)
Some good questions Dottie. It really comes down to the quality level you are looking for. It is easier to scan or take a digital picture of your prints, but remember that the print was made from the negative and so the negative contains the most information. Each reproduction from that original looses a little info. I scan from film on a drum scanner I have access to at work, but even the flatbed scanners available today can do a good capture from a slide. It all depends on the resolution the scanner is capable of. A scan at 2400 dpi will give you a workable 8x10 image from a 35mm slide.
In most cases scanning or shooting from your print will be just fine (assuming you're happy with the quality of the print), but for those really critical shots, go from the film.
Good luck,
Bruce
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