RetouchPRO

Go Back   RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Restoration
Register Blogs FAQ Site Nav Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Photo Restoration Repairing damaged photos

Colouring the pictures: ¿How to?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 05-02-2010, 06:55 PM
Florin's Avatar
Florin Florin is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Trujillo - Venezuela
Posts: 251
Re: Colouring the pictures: ¿How to?

Very nice pics, good jobs. But, as u say, working with old stuff is so different.
People never send me new pics, just mess to be fixed.... I like very much your colors
Reply With Quote top
  #22  
Old 05-02-2010, 07:49 PM
skydog's Avatar
skydog skydog is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Carolina
Posts: 1,294
Re: Colouring the pictures: ¿How to?

panpan...also very nice...

even with your technique nailed down how long does it take you?

Last edited by skydog; 05-02-2010 at 08:00 PM.
Reply With Quote top
  #23  
Old 05-02-2010, 11:46 PM
Panpan's Avatar
Panpan Panpan is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Gatineau, QC Canada
Posts: 352
Re: Colouring the pictures: ¿How to?

Thank you Florin and skydog.

Quote:
even with your technique nailed down how long does it take you?
Let's see...

About half an hour to put every item on its own layer. The original b&w at the bottom is the only luminance layer. The other layers are in color mode, with a hue or a color balance adjustment layer clipped to some of them.
I put skin on top, then hair, lips, eyes, teeth, clothes, etc. The selections get progressively easier because I only have to do a very rough selection on the edges already masked above. For example, I only select a rough oval for the outside of the lips; I only have to worry about masking out teeth.

Next I research and decide the colors I'm going to use. What were that celebrity's hair and eye colors? What are the colors of an Underwood typewriter? Research can be hard. For example, what is the color of that flower that I cannot name? What is that thing behind Lana Turner? Put an hour there.

The colorizing itself is easy. I already have gradient maps for different skins, hairs and objects to use as a starting point. Put half an hour here for applying those and to create some new gradient maps from the example images I googled in the previous step.
Reply With Quote top
  #24  
Old 05-03-2010, 12:00 AM
chillin's Avatar
chillin chillin is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: The Golden State
Posts: 1,324
Blog Entries: 1
Re: Colouring the pictures: ¿How to?

Very nice work Florin & Panpan.
Here another technique you could add to your toolbox.
Reply With Quote top
  #25  
Old 05-03-2010, 04:31 AM
sergio2263's Avatar
sergio2263 sergio2263 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: London
Posts: 612
Thumbs up Re: Colouring the pictures: ¿How to?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Florin View Post
Hi, Helen. I´m some crazy guy which spent 4 or 5 more time to restore a high level pic. I´m talking abut some very damaged ones like this: http://i40.tinypic.com/xeqt89.jpg
Easy pics never come to me. So, I have ipmroved the clone-brushpaint technique all these years just because leave behind a lot of details in a "fixed" pic is not for my taste. Maybe I´m too exagerate, that´s true, but I get accustomed to paint. This started when I knew what the clonebrush can do. It´s much more better than the paintbrush (B) because you can have blended pixels, transitions etc and not so flat colors as "B" brush. It´s just a skill technique, nothing more. I also study or look a lot abuot the human physiognomy. This helps me to rebuilt (like the pic above) the fadded and missing parts of the image. I always start with the eyes, rebuilt and expression. If you´ll do good eyes you´ll have inloved the client. Then, go down little by little, painting the nose, mouth and cheeks. It´s so slow but sometimes the damages are so extended and no tool could remake the image. Work hard with the clonebrush and you´ll see in some middle-time the best resoults.
Cheers
Thanks Florin for your reply, this is the first time i've heard of clone-brush technique I suppose you learn something everyday. Your work is wonderful looks similar to smudge painting it looks like hard work what you've done and I am sure you've put years of practice to get as good as you have.

Keep up the wonderful work I am sure you have lots of very satisfied customers.


regards


helen
Reply With Quote top
  #26  
Old 05-03-2010, 05:38 AM
skydog's Avatar
skydog skydog is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Carolina
Posts: 1,294
Re: Colouring the pictures: ¿How to?

PanPan...

tell me a little more about your gradient maps...different for each application? what do you find to be the difference between using and not using?
Reply With Quote top
  #27  
Old 05-03-2010, 12:43 PM
Panpan's Avatar
Panpan Panpan is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Gatineau, QC Canada
Posts: 352
Re: Colouring the pictures: ¿How to?

skydog,

I have a basic set of gradients for skin and hair that I use as a starting point and modify with hue/saturation or adjustment layers.
I attached them to this entry. I made them from skin patch sets available here I think. Most of the gradients are self-explanatory when you hover the mouse over them. Some are more obscure like Vlady. I made it from sampling French actress Marina Vlady's lips (only the photo, alas).
I repurpose gradients all the time. For instance when I'm not using 'Vlady', I may use a more saturated, red-shifted version of a skin gradient.

Quote:
what do you find to be the difference between using and not using?
Skin is not monochromatic with two spots of blush on the cheeks.
First of all, skin - and hair more so - is shiny and shine desaturates. So my gradients have lower saturation for lighter shades, all the way to white.

Second, skin is semi-transparent. With more light you see more of the yellow fat underneath. There are also many areas that are redder: cheekbones, nose, chin point, front skull plate and ears (some people have full-ear blush; others have upper ear blush). And that's only the face.
I handle the yellow shift in the gradient and the red shift with a color balance adjustment layer clipped to the skin layer. That adjustment is masked with a highly feathered selection of the areas mentioned above.

Third, the darker the skin, the more variations it has.

Fourth and last, variations are esthetically pleasing.

I've talked of skin and hair, but this applies to varying degree to other items in a photograph. That's why I use gradients to colorize them too.
Attached Files
File Type: zip Pierre Gradients.zip (3.8 KB, 37 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #28  
Old 05-03-2010, 12:47 PM
Panpan's Avatar
Panpan Panpan is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Gatineau, QC Canada
Posts: 352
Re: Colouring the pictures: ¿How to?

Chillin,

Thank you for the link. I'm reading it.
Reply With Quote top
Reply

  RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Restoration


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pictures to retouch? Heavynne Photo Retouching 5 05-17-2010 09:43 PM
Need your opinion regarding my jewelry pictures syfred Photo Retouching 6 11-10-2009 11:58 AM
Need help with my brothers wedding pictures rosierosierosie Image Help 50 07-09-2009 04:43 PM
Where to find copyright free or released pictures? g2000blue Legal Issues 1 04-25-2009 01:23 AM
Question ABOUT LEGAL ASPECT OF PHOTOSHOOT ppoppin Legal Issues 3 09-25-2008 12:28 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:59 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright © 2016 Doug Nelson. All Rights Reserved