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Settings for Scanning

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  #11  
Old 09-25-2010, 07:12 AM
unimatrix001 unimatrix001 is offline
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Re: Settings for Scanning

I found this link on another forum.
http://photodoctor911.com/scantips.html
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  #12  
Old 09-26-2010, 10:47 AM
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maverick911 maverick911 is offline
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Re: Settings for Scanning

Quote:
Originally Posted by unimatrix001 View Post
I found this link on another forum.
http://photodoctor911.com/scantips.html
Thats really useful thank you.
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  #13  
Old 09-29-2010, 10:15 AM
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Carol Heath Carol Heath is offline
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Re: Settings for Scanning

I generally suggest the following formula for calculating a suitable scan resolution. Of course, you should always take into consideration the output size.

scan resolution = (desired width / actual width) * desired resolution
If the original image is 2.5" wide and a 6" print @ 300 ppi is required
scan resolution = (6 / 2.5) * 300 = 720ppi.

I scan all images in RGB, regardless of whether they are black and white, sepia or colour. Information potentially useful for restoring monochrome images can be extracted from the individual RGB (red, green and blue) colour channels.

I also avoid using any auto correction functions on my scanner. I would much prefer to make corrections in Photoshop where I have full control. I do use the descreen function on occasion however. HTH
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  #14  
Old 09-29-2010, 12:59 PM
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Re: Settings for Scanning

Thanks Carol
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  #15  
Old 09-29-2010, 07:22 PM
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Smile Re: Settings for Scanning

Thanks for posting this question its one that I have been struggling with. Thanks for the advice on sizing (MisterMonday and for the calculators Unimatrix001 and Carol). I have scanned photos at 300, 600, 1200, 2000 dpi - the higher resolutions only because of needing to enlarge a really small old photo. Where the photo is of good quality this has been useful if I have been looking to resize it. However one problem I have discovered is this introduces unwanted textures or enlarges those age defects - so I would be interested to know what people do... particularly where your printer outputs higher than 300dpi. Is it better to scan at the printer resolution or scan at a lower resolution and let the printer resample to size (I have an Epsom that prints at 1440 dpi ). Or is it better to scan at the lower resolution and resize in photoshop?
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  #16  
Old 09-29-2010, 08:36 PM
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Re: Settings for Scanning

JoReam, I wish printer manufacturers would not mislead people with marketing numbers. That 1440 dpi is not the same as 1440 ppi.That's because each inkjet printer rating dpi is something entirely different, referring to inkjet printer ink dots instead of image pixels. The inkjet printer tries to simulate the color of one image pixel by making several ink dots of four CMYK ink colors, which are located perhaps on 1200 or 1440 dpi spacing. The printer is trying the best it possibly can to reproduce the pixels (pixels is all there is), but inkjets cannot reproduce colored pixels directly. Image pixels and inkjet printer ink dots are NOT the same thing at all.
A 300 pixels per inch image is considered print quality and is the highest you should ever need for a high quality print.
Regards, Murray
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  #17  
Old 09-30-2010, 01:12 AM
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Carol Heath Carol Heath is offline
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Re: Settings for Scanning

JoReam, Scanning small images at a very high resolution can, as you mentioned introduce new challenges, especially with textured papers. I sometimes find re-photographing these very small images a better option. Of course, this also means you need a good, sharp macro lens.
As Mistermonday has explained, your printer does not really output at 1440ppi. I would aim for 300ppi as your output resolution.
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  #18  
Old 09-30-2010, 03:00 AM
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Re: Settings for Scanning

Just another stuff that comes to my mind...When you scan an image on paper (I mean not a film) Try to scan the same image at different angles (I mean parallel to upper borders, parallel to the side borders and 45 degrees) sometimes it helps to get rid of moiré and/or rays of lights created by creases and folds. Sometime you will be able to use 2 images and combinate them afterwards eg. in case of silvering stains (because the scanner light doesn't come on the same angle each time)
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  #19  
Old 09-30-2010, 05:20 AM
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Smile Re: Settings for Scanning

This is really helpful - thanks very much Murray, Carol and 4personnen it has made me go and look at my printer output a little more carefully. My printer maxiumum print settings are 1440 dpi in one direction and 2880 dpi in the other which I mistakedly thought was 1440 dpi and I now realise it is not. Thank you also for the suggestions about scanning in different directions, I didn't know about offsetting at 45 degrees.
Last year I tried restoring a small photo for a friend who wanted it enlarged. I then struggled to get rid of the texture. I didn't know at that time how to calculate the scanning resolution from the output size and I didn't have a good enough light setup to photograph it. The good thing is I found this wonderful site as a result of a google search trying to solve these problems!
Jo
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  #20  
Old 08-17-2012, 08:56 AM
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Gabriel Pinto Gabriel Pinto is offline
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Re: Settings for Scanning

Sorry to bring back this somewhat old thread.

regarding output formats, Ctein in its Digital Restoration From Start to Finish mentions several times that he changes levels right in the scanner software while in the scanning process.

While I try to scan using Vuescan, I do change levels before the final scan but since I output the files in Raw format these changes are not applied. They are only applied if I output in JPG format.

What's the catch here?
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