RetouchPRO

Go Back   RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Restoration
Register Blogs FAQ Site Nav Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Photo Restoration Repairing damaged photos

Epson scan or SilverfastSE

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 08-07-2004, 09:31 PM
Shoff Shoff is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 56
Epson scan or SilverfastSE

Silver fast came with the scanner so I'm not sure which I should use. Anyone have experience with these programs?
I'm using it for flatbed scanning original photos.

Is there a better version of Silverfast?
Reply With Quote top
  #2  
Old 08-07-2004, 09:39 PM
Doug Nelson's Avatar
Doug Nelson Doug Nelson is offline
Janitor
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,068
Blog Entries: 21
I have them both and use Epsonscan. A lot of the Silverfast options are replicated (better) in Photoshop. Just use Epsonscan, turn off all automation, and get the best raw scan you can. Then use PS to make adjustments.
Reply With Quote top
  #3  
Old 08-07-2004, 09:43 PM
Shoff Shoff is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 56
What setting are you using? Since I'm just starting out it would good to know.
Reply With Quote top
  #4  
Old 08-07-2004, 09:56 PM
Doug Nelson's Avatar
Doug Nelson Doug Nelson is offline
Janitor
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,068
Blog Entries: 21
It varies from scan to scan, plus I use a calibrating package (Monaco EasyColor2, which should come with your scanner). But I generally scan in 16bit mode. That's about the only constant. Everything else changes depending on what I'm scanning.
Reply With Quote top
  #5  
Old 08-07-2004, 10:18 PM
Shoff Shoff is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 56
Actually it didn't come with it. Also since I've just started can you give me a few examples of what you scanned and the settings?
Reply With Quote top
  #6  
Old 08-07-2004, 11:11 PM
Doug Nelson's Avatar
Doug Nelson Doug Nelson is offline
Janitor
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,068
Blog Entries: 21
You want to resample (change size and/or resolution) as few times as possible, so start by calculating the largest possible printed size the final image will be. Multiply that times 300 (height and width separately). This gives you your total pixels you need wide and tall. Divide that into the actual dimensions of the original, and you get the minimum scan resolution necessary. If I have a tiny original that will eventually end up as an 8x10, I might scan as high as 800ppi (even though there's no additional information past 300ppi, it still saves from the degradation of resampling later on). If the original and the largest possible final print are exactly the same size, scan at 300ppi.

Actually, I'm oversimplifying, because I'll normally assume that an unforeseen print in the future might be a size larger, so I'll use that for my figure.

Beyond that, calibrating your scanner beforehand, and setting it to 16bit, that's all you need for your scanner. Everything else can be handled by Photoshop (or your image editor of choice).

Oh yeah, I always scan in RGB mode, even with black and white originals.

And another exception is line art, which I'll scan at 1200ppi or more regardless, especially if it's going to be converted to vectors.

I really think you're worrying too much about the settings part. Learn your image editor and the scanning steps will be more intuitive.
Reply With Quote top
  #7  
Old 08-08-2004, 05:22 AM
Shoff Shoff is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 56
great. So I don't need 24 or 48 bit scans? And to simplify, scans over 1000dpi are wasted even if I want to take a 3x5 and enlarge to 8x10?

Should I do levels, curves, etc... during the scan or in PS?
Reply With Quote top
  #8  
Old 08-08-2004, 06:40 AM
kiska's Avatar
kiska kiska is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: mentone,ala
Posts: 623
Doug, do I understand your scan reso explanation or have I oversimplified?
Final print size(8x10) divided by orig. image size(2x2.25)=4x4.5.Multiply largest dimension(4.5)x300=1350 scanning resolution. Thanks
kiska
BTW-what is the size of a 35mm neg in inches???
Reply With Quote top
  #9  
Old 08-08-2004, 07:36 AM
Doug Nelson's Avatar
Doug Nelson Doug Nelson is offline
Janitor
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,068
Blog Entries: 21
Shoff:

Remember, bit depth is expressed per channel, so when I say 16bit it's 16bits each for the red, blue, and green channel (which would be a total of 48bits, and marketers love to refer to it that way, though it's incorrect and misleading).

And do all levels, curves, color adjustments, etc. after the scan (and on a copy of the scan file, archive the original).

Kiska:

If your final print is going to be 8x10, that would be (8*300)pixels by (10*300)pixels. Divide each of those by the available inches in your original to get your minimum scanning resolution in ppi (pixels per inch). And I used to know the slide dimensions, but suffice it to say you can simply max out your scanner on them, because there's not a desktop scanner on the market that can extract all the information from a slide. (the preceding math formula is for scanning prints, which are inherently lower-rez than slides)

Everyone:

There's a lot more details about this topic in the Input/Output/Workflow forum.
Reply With Quote top
Reply

  RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Restoration


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Am I getting the best scan? useyourhead Hardware 5 10-15-2007 04:43 AM
Epson R300 agillette Hardware 1 02-23-2005 05:38 AM
Epson 2200P News Gerry Monaghan Hardware 4 07-21-2002 07:55 PM
Your setup Doug Nelson Hardware 11 04-23-2002 11:19 AM
Windows XP and Epson 1270 George Software 5 02-08-2002 04:33 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:53 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright © 2016 Doug Nelson. All Rights Reserved