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Portraits (Subject is wearng glasses)

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  #1  
Old 10-27-2004, 12:12 AM
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Conk Conk is offline
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Portraits (Subject is wearng glasses)

I am looking at defeating a problem before it happens. I have a photo shoot coming in a week and one of the subjects wears glasses. Any tips would be helpful, post process or pre.
I'll be shooting with 2 Alieb Bee 400's and do have an 420ex.
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Old 10-27-2004, 12:34 AM
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You might try....

Hi,
I used to work for a photographer. One of the things he would do is have the subject tilt their glasses down a bit. The trick was to get them tilted just enough so the glare would be gone but not so much that it looked funny.

You may also try having that person stand/sit to one side of the group so that they only get the worst of one of your lights. Just a thought...

I have removed a LOT of glass glare in the past. As long as one eye is at least 90% visible then you can use that to rebuild what is missing on the other eye.

Hope this helps!

-Mindy
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Old 10-27-2004, 12:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PixiePirate
Hi,
I used to work for a photographer. One of the things he would do is have the subject tilt their glasses down a bit. The trick was to get them tilted just enough so the glare would be gone but not so much that it looked funny.

You may also try having that person stand/sit to one side of the group so that they only get the worst of one of your lights. Just a thought...

I have removed a LOT of glass glare in the past. As long as one eye is at least 90% visible then you can use that to rebuild what is missing on the other eye.

Hope this helps!

-Mindy
Thanks Mindy. I'll have to try posistioning the lighting in different ways and see about tilting the glasses a touch. Rebuilding the eye would work but lets hope I can avoide that.
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Old 10-27-2004, 02:19 AM
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Hi Colin,

Just in case it is not clear, tilting the glasses means raising the back of the glasses so they float above the ears, not lowering the eyeglasses off of the brim of the nose you just have to be careful you don't raise them so high it looks geeky ....

Also if the person with glasses has there shoulder towards the main light instead of their chest towards the main light you will get less reflections (people don't turn there heads all the way straight, just most of the way - so the glasses will be facing a little to the non-main light side instead of the main light side of the camera)

Also, with a large group - the people in the lower rows will get less of the fill light in their glasses - because from the cameras point of view the reflection is lower.

Good luck,
Roger
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Old 10-27-2004, 10:29 AM
pmcbride pmcbride is offline
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just to be safe...

take an additional shot with your subjects glasses removed. This way if you struggle with the lighting you will still have the information that may be lost due to the glare. You'll have some ps work to do this way but better to be safe then sorry.

Just my 2 cents
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Old 10-27-2004, 10:58 AM
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Thanks for the suggestions. I may just ask that person to bring a pair of glasses with no lenses if he can. However, if he cannot then I'll have to come up with a solution.
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Old 10-27-2004, 12:28 PM
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Tilting the glasses works, but it might feel funny to the person wearing them. Being careful not to tilt too much, you can assure them that it will look fine in the photo. Another thing you might try if playing with lighting and tilting the glasses doesn't bring desired results, is to have the person lower his/her chin a little, but watch for the double chin effect. Good luck.

Ed
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Old 10-27-2004, 04:04 PM
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Chip Hildreth Chip Hildreth is offline
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It's much easier to do what Roger suggests than to fix the reflections in post. It's not too difficult in most portrait situations to position your light(s) in such a way that the reflections are minimized. I've never tried the tilting glasses bit, sounds like a good idea.

If you happen to have some polarizing film around you may try polarizing your lights and lens; that's a good way to control strong reflections. You can get polarizing film from most photographic/theatrical lighting distributers... it's kind of pricey though.

chip
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Old 11-29-2005, 02:26 PM
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I like the glasses with no lens idea very creative. I agree with the one shot with and one with out. I had some one in our database with glasses and now does not wear them any more and removing the glasses in PS was a pain. I would rather add them than remove them.
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Old 11-30-2005, 10:38 PM
richarn richarn is offline
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Eyeglass glare is by far easier to remove when shot than in post processing. Its all about angles and makeing sure the lights are not positioned in the reflection path. Just watch them while you shoot. Make the subject put the glasses on a straight as possible and keep the face as straight on to the camera as possible. If you still get reflection move the lights. One trick is to raise the lights higher to get them out of reflection path. Most of the time the desired lighting effect is not changed when they are raised by a little.

Rick
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