RetouchPRO

Go Back   RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Retouching
Register Blogs FAQ Site Nav Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Photo Retouching "Improving" photos, post-production, correction, etc.

Mimicking Cross Processing Effect

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 10-30-2005, 09:19 AM
Cassidy Cassidy is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Australia
Posts: 1,104
Thanks, I think Pierre!
Reply With Quote top
  #12  
Old 10-30-2005, 09:51 AM
Craig Walters's Avatar
Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: somewhere over there
Posts: 8,786
Blog Entries: 4
pierre,

thank you. that does help and i sort of get the idea now. i've a couple more newbie photography questions if you're willing. as an amateur photographer, i never shot with slide film. heck, i'm not even sure back then i knew there was such a thing as slide specific film. had i wanted slides i most probably would have taken the shots in normal film and had it processed into slides. and you mention 'color transparency film', which i assume is primarily used to make color transparencies for overhead projectors or some such. so why do they call it 'color reversal film' when you're talking about slides? a slide comes out as a positive when processed, so i assume it had to be a negative first. so, what's 'reversed' about it? and ok, it's a transparency, so that part is reversed. is that it? is that why they call it color reversal?

obviously, i've got some confusions here. any help to straighten me out would be appreciated.

oh, and i can now contribute a tiny bit to the original topic of this thread. you can do some very interesting techniques with 'curves'. and i think this might fit with what you're talking about here. just reverse your settings in various channels from what you'd normally do. i did a little experimenting with this a while back and rather than making a gentle sloping curve or something along those lines, do a sine wave type with lots of peaks and valleys. you can really get some of those 'color processing' effects that way.

Craig
Reply With Quote top
  #13  
Old 10-31-2005, 07:42 AM
Panpan's Avatar
Panpan Panpan is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Gatineau, QC Canada
Posts: 352
Craig,
I don't know much about the details of slide processing, but I looked it up for you. A slide starts as a negative image. A later step reverses that into a positive. Thus the name.

Pierre
Reply With Quote top
  #14  
Old 10-31-2005, 09:07 AM
Cassidy Cassidy is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Australia
Posts: 1,104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Panpan
Craig,
I don't know much about the details of slide processing, but I looked it up for you. A slide starts as a negative image. A later step reverses that into a positive. Thus the name.

Pierre
Having a negative scanner, it definitelu scans i positive mode
Reply With Quote top
  #15  
Old 10-31-2005, 12:42 PM
Panpan's Avatar
Panpan Panpan is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Gatineau, QC Canada
Posts: 352
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassidy
Having a negative scanner, it definitelu scans i positive mode
Yes, the end result is a positive image. However, within the chemical process there are some early steps where the image is a negative.

Pierre
Reply With Quote top
  #16  
Old 10-31-2005, 08:35 PM
Craig Walters's Avatar
Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: somewhere over there
Posts: 8,786
Blog Entries: 4
thanks guys.

i did a little bit of looking also. and both normal print film and slide film burn as a negative first. both are then converted to a positive. in the case of 'normal' film it gets printed on paper, and in the case of slides, it gets printed on a transparency. ok, so we all kinda knew that. what i had forgotten was that a slide negative in 35mm prints to 35 mm on color transparency film....at least as best i can currently understand it. this is off the Kodak.com site:
Quote:
KODAK VERICOLOR Slide Film is intended for producing same-size positive transparencies from color negatives or for making reduced-size transparencies from larger negatives.
so, even though both films use a negative to positive approach, the slide film is printing its results onto a color transparency film and perhaps that's why they use different development processing? lol. oh well, i think i at least answered my original question

thanks.

Craig

edit: i may still have this a bit wrong. i see on that same site that they talk about something called an 'internegative', which i'm currently assuming is where you might take normal film, transfer it by a photographic process to this 'internegative', which then allows to transfer it chemically to the color transparency? lol. why do i get into these things?
Reply With Quote top
  #17  
Old 10-31-2005, 08:53 PM
Craig Walters's Avatar
Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: somewhere over there
Posts: 8,786
Blog Entries: 4
ok, i just did another search on 'how stuff works' and got this:
Quote:
Film Options
When you purchase a roll of film for your camera, you have a lot of choices. Those products that have the word "color" in their name are generally used to produce color prints that you can hold in your hand and view by reflected light. The negatives that are returned with your prints are the exposures that were made in your camera. Those products that have the word "chrome" in their name produce a color transparency (slides) that requires some form of projector for viewing. In this case, the returned slides are the actual film that was exposed in your camera.
so, slides ARE the film from the camera. and that in turn explains a bit more

Craig
Reply With Quote top
  #18  
Old 11-01-2005, 08:15 AM
Craig Walters's Avatar
Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: somewhere over there
Posts: 8,786
Blog Entries: 4
hopefully, just some further clarifications on some of these terms:
Quote:
A negative created directly from a colour-reversal (positive) or black-white positive film. It is the negative copy of the camera original.
www.vistek.ca/glossary/default.asp
this is apparently used to take a slide BACK to a negative. it's also a term used when taking a print BACK to a negative.

so, now that i've effectively killed this thread... cross processing is based on the two different, standard processes for developing, one for normal prints and one for developing negatives into slides. so, by crossing the processes, using one for other than it was intended, you get odd, sometimes desirable results. whew!

we now return to your regularly scheduled programming.

Craig
Reply With Quote top
Reply

  RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Retouching


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Glamour retouch challenge here!!!! superkoax Photo Retouching 332 02-08-2011 08:52 PM
Blood Effect Saleem Akram Non-RetouchPRO Resources 5 08-07-2007 09:01 AM
Help with the Luminosity and Color Effect ekrieg Hidden Power Support 10 07-18-2007 09:07 PM
Heavy post processing effect on printout bestremera Photo Compositing 0 12-27-2006 06:19 PM
Need help to make this photo effect wolverine Photo-Art 101 9 06-25-2006 01:46 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright © 2016 Doug Nelson. All Rights Reserved