RetouchPRO

Go Back   RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Retouching
Register Blogs FAQ Site Nav Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Photo Retouching "Improving" photos, post-production, correction, etc.

How to get highly polished skin?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #41  
Old 11-21-2005, 06:33 PM
Larbear's Avatar
Larbear Larbear is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Iowa
Posts: 23
Oops

Shellby, and everyone else, I did not mean to imply that this was my photo, I just tried my hand at trying to achive the effect you were looking for. Really sorry if I've done something wrong.... Larry
Reply With Quote top
  #42  
Old 11-21-2005, 07:23 PM
yuccaview yuccaview is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 25
Hi folks,
I am a new guy here but my guess would be these were done in painter using
a very light blending brush (10%or so) that brush would be "just add water"
I do this on almost every image that I work on.
If you have never tried this it is a great finishing brush for retouch work done in photoshop and you can take this as far as you want and make the image look porcelain if you want.
Don
Reply With Quote top
  #43  
Old 11-21-2005, 10:20 PM
ray12's Avatar
ray12 ray12 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 320
Do you have any examples you can show on how the look comes out? Or a pointer to a site maybe. Sounds interesting.
Reply With Quote top
  #44  
Old 11-22-2005, 06:36 AM
shellby's Avatar
shellby shellby is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 299
image

That's ok, just letting people know where the image is from. A really great New York photographer... up and coming!
Reply With Quote top
  #45  
Old 11-22-2005, 08:17 AM
gmitchel gmitchel is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 316
Why the reluctance to use blur? It is acceptable to retouch in other ways, but using a blur is somehow "over the line" when retouching? A blur is too artificial? It's less artificial to use a clone/healing brush/patch tools with something like the Wacom airbrush tool?

For those who are less reticent about using blurs and more focused on pleasing retouch results, here's a few tips:

(1) Concentrate on the green channel. If you want to blur a channel, the green channel is the best candidate.

(2) Skin details like pores are usually most evident in the blue channel. It can also benefit from some softening of details. A little more care is needed here to avoid an artifical look. There is an important line separating highly polished and plastic/waxy.

(3) Make sure to mask the skin before you apply any blur or other methods of softening details like Median. The idea is to give only the skin a polished look.

Keep in mind that lighting matters. Light bouncing off key areas provides shaping for an image. You can apply a curve to the highlights with a luminosity mask (crude), a tone-based mask (better), or something like a Lighten blend and Blend If sliders. For details on a tone-based mask, here are a couple of resources:

http://www.thelightsrightstudio.com/...TheNumbers.pdf
http://www.thelightsrightstudio.com/...askToolkit.htm

If there are no highlights, consider adding some modeling with the Photoshop Lighting Effects filter. Harold Heim's Light Machine is a Photoshop add-in that gives you lots of control. You can control both lighting and shadow effects.

I find that applying a diffuse glow, particularly a high key glow provides excellent results. Here are a couple of resources on adding a diffuse glow.

http://www.thelightsrightstudio.com/...hotosAGlow.pdf
http://www.thelightsrightstudio.com/TLRDiffuseGlows.htm

If you really must avoid the use of blurs altogether, you can use the patch tool. Look at your image. You need to have portions of skin that are smooth and free from blemishes. Identify the areas you want to replace and the areas that have enough replacement skin to clone. Then create a Merge Visible duplicate layer (alt+ctrl+shift+n+e). Work on the first area you want to replace. Use the patch tool to replace the skin. Then apply a Fade (ctrl-shift-F). This will diffuse the effect of the replacement.

Here's another tip to try:

Make a Merge Visible duplicate layer (alt+ctrl+shift+n+e). Invert the layer. Desaturate it. Add a Reveal All layer mask. Make sure the mask is selected. Now, run Apply Image with Source: filename, Layer: Background, Channel: RGB, Blending: Normal, Opacity: 100%. Click the Blend Mode for the layer to Soft Light.

This maneuver with the layer mask will reduce both the highlights and the shadows. That has the effect of smoothing the skin.

The effect, as described, is appled to the entire image. If you want to limit it to just the skin (recommended), you can mask the skin. Then combine the mask from above and the skin mask with Calculations (a Darken or Multiply blend). Or, you can use a Layer Group/Set in CS/CS2 and then add the mask for the skin to that.

Cheers,

Mitch
Reply With Quote top
  #46  
Old 11-22-2005, 10:19 AM
cricket1961's Avatar
cricket1961 cricket1961 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Flower Mound, Texas
Posts: 488
Blog Entries: 38
Hey Mitch!

Nice to see some apply image techniques here. Apply image and Calculations are probably my favorite tools in PS.
The technique you described is a great way to flatten out an image or portions thereof. As long as some of the shape is brought back in with proper lighting, its a step saver.
There is nothing wrong per se with Blurring an image to help with Flesh problems. However, at the hi level there is a noticable "rejection" rate from clients who are seeing more and more how destructive and fake looking it can become when used unwisely. A low level blur, along with a low level noise application, combined with a proper opacity can definetly help things out. A retoucher needs to know when this can be used and when not to. A talk with the client ahead of time on what is to be expected for a end result can decide this issue.
Obviously time is also an issue that can help decide when to use a blur or not. I just finished a large campaign for a underwear company that featured full body shots... lots of skin! Had to be done quickly but realistically. No blemishes, even on the men. A blur came in handy but one would never know it.

Chris
Reply With Quote top
  #47  
Old 11-22-2005, 10:44 AM
tetsuo's Avatar
tetsuo tetsuo is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Singapore
Posts: 48
i know i am lazy but anyone looked into Kodak GEM airbrush pro? give the trial a try.
Reply With Quote top
  #48  
Old 11-22-2005, 10:49 AM
gmitchel gmitchel is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 316
Well that is the goal of all retouching, isn't it? To do the job with enough craftsmanship that the image is enhanced without looking artificial or otherwise drawing attention to the retouch itself.

I agree that a careless blur can detract from an otherwise fine image. Same is true for any retouch one might consider: color balance, dynamic range, noise removal, sharpening, etc.

Emphasizing "no blur" makes little sense to me. There is nothing about blur per se that should rule the tool out of consideration, IMHO. If people want a stylized look that does not appear too artificial, why not say that.

Like the way people stand and pose for glamour ads is not stylized and artifical to start with. And Santa comes twice a year, too.

Cheers,

Mitch

P.S. I am not a fan of going back and adding in monochromatic noise to avoid skin that is "too" polished. Just watch your opacity levels for your blends. If you use clone tools, watch the fill as well as the opacity, etc. Let a bit of the original skin texture show through. IMHO, adding noise is telltale, once you are familiar with what to look for.
Reply With Quote top
  #49  
Old 11-22-2005, 11:24 AM
cricket1961's Avatar
cricket1961 cricket1961 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Flower Mound, Texas
Posts: 488
Blog Entries: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmitchel
Mitch

P.S. I am not a fan of going back and adding in monochromatic noise to avoid skin that is "too" polished. Just watch your opacity levels for your blends. If you use clone tools, watch the fill as well as the opacity, etc. Let a bit of the original skin texture show through. IMHO, adding noise is telltale, once you are familiar with what to look for.

I agree. I have said as much in other posts on other threads. I fully believe in the natural texture for all stuff is best.

Chris

Try telling my kids that Santa does not come more than once a year! : )
Reply With Quote top
  #50  
Old 11-22-2005, 11:25 AM
cricket1961's Avatar
cricket1961 cricket1961 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Flower Mound, Texas
Posts: 488
Blog Entries: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetsuo
i know i am lazy but anyone looked into Kodak GEM airbrush pro? give the trial a try.

It has its place in retouching at a consumer level in my opinion. You are better off learning how to do it yourself.

Chris
Reply With Quote top
Reply

  RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Retouching


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Glamour retouch challenge here!!!! superkoax Photo Retouching 332 02-08-2011 09:52 PM
Colour correcting skin by volume mikoe Input/Output/Workflow 11 08-16-2007 12:04 AM
First try at dodge and burn skin! ruud92 Photo Retouching 14 05-08-2007 11:47 AM
new skin texture bullys1974 Photo Retouching 2 01-28-2007 04:53 AM
Matching skin tones jeaniesa Photo Retouching 4 09-22-2004 12:25 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright © 2016 Doug Nelson. All Rights Reserved