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Photo Retouching "Improving" photos, post-production, correction, etc.

Orange Peel Skin Texture - How to get

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  #21  
Old 11-15-2005, 11:27 AM
maureeno maureeno is offline
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Here are some for download purchase:

http://www.turbosquid.com/Search/Ind...Key=human+skin

This one is really nice:

http://www.turbosquid.com/FullPrevie....cfm/ID/272019

Last edited by maureeno; 11-15-2005 at 11:40 AM.
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  #22  
Old 11-15-2005, 02:30 PM
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ray12 ray12 is offline
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NancyJ and Maureeno - Great stuff. Nice Finds.

Nancy J - the link to the photo you gave is incredible - it has all the textures figured out - I was especially impressed with the ability to re-create eye line wrinkles realistically!!

How could we be able to use this stuff??

Just like a lot of people are not familiar with the intracacies of retouching or photoshop masks - Im not familiar on how to warp a grid into a 3D person. Its almost like we would need an intermediary. The programs have to have a real strong learning curve. I would like to have a small sub-section of what they have to offer - the grain and wrinkle patterns around facial features as textures.

Maureeno - I looked at the textures for sale - and have to do some more browsing to see and understand which ones would be of interest. To pay 4 to 10 bucks for a template that could be re-used would be very cost efficient. Id be looking for cheek texture, eye lines and forehead and general body skin texture.

A good sheet of that stuff could be warped or masked or displacement mapped pretty nicely to add that texture back to our over zealous smoothing efforts. Cool stuff.

Im starting to look at some Nagle textured brushes - Dont know how to use them to their fullest yet - but there are some 30 to 60 skin related brushes from what I can see on the main download page. They are free if you have the insight and artistry on how to use them smartly. Its amazing how little I know about so much - even in just this one little area.

Ray 12
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  #23  
Old 11-15-2005, 09:50 PM
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RooB RooB is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by byRo
If you are interested on 3D skin then this might interest you.
I love 3D work, and I have used software like that here and there, when needed, to interject a little something into my work.

If you're interested, check out Blender3D, a free 3D renderer.
http://www.blender.org/cms/Home.2.0.html

I did a fair bit of basic 3D compositing for a landscaper-- I would take a 2D image of a house, and then build and render 3D elements into the landscape such as bridges, decks, outdoor lamps, etc. There are things you can achieve in 3D in a short order of time that would take days to do working in 2D, and if you make a mistake in perspective it is just a matter of tilting things in 3D space and re-rendering.

People, now, they're something else. Rendering people in 3D is fairly easy, but rendering people in 3D so the lighting is natural and looks good is very complicated, on top of that, to render realistic lights and shadows in 3D can take hours of time to render an image for even our fastest computers.

I've included a render I was working on awhile ago, trying to achieve a little realism in my 3D rendering with a single light-- when it comes to complicated 3D, I'm very much a beginner. But, it's still a lot of fun to get involved with.
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File Type: jpg Render_Roob.jpg (62.1 KB, 348 views)
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  #24  
Old 11-15-2005, 09:51 PM
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Klaatu Baradda Klaatu Baradda is offline
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Pooring On The Pores

Greetings All,
Here's another approach that is perhaps a bit more direct in creating skin texture (particularly pores) without a lot of hullabaloo.

1) Create a new layer (above your model's face) and Fill it with 50% gray (Edit>Fill>50% Gray)
2) Add Noise (10%-Gaussian-monochromatic)
3) Go to Filter>Stylize>Emboss (135°/2/100)
4) Set the layer blending to Overlay
5) Add a mask to the layer with "Hide All" (i.e., filled with black)
6) Grab a soft brush, low opacity (10%) and set foreground color to white.

Now, paint on the mask where you want the pores to show. Typically, this will be stronger in the darker or shadow areas of a face.

Of course, you can tweak the Noise and Emboss layer to be smaller or larger pores OR you can alway grab a photo of skin, desaturate it, use it as the embossed layer and carry on with the other steps.
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  #25  
Old 11-16-2005, 05:01 AM
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byRo byRo is offline
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3D Folks

Interesting to see that some RtP buddies have also been dabbling in 3D stuff.
I, myself, am still scaling the learning curves of Blender and Poser.

[hijack ]

Besides making skin texture, I've been thinking of two other interactions between the 2D and 3D worlds:
1) Filling in missing parts: When an image is missing a part (a hand, maybe), we may have to browse through hundreds of images trying to find a hand that has the right pose and lighting - why not just pose and light one ourselves, in Poser?

2) Restoration (Modelling): If an image is very badly damaged but we can still make out enough features then, instead of trying to fix up the old image, just make a
new one conforming to all the features that we can still see. (doesn't seem possible yet - at least not with Poser / Blender, but someday we'll get there)
[/hijack]

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  #26  
Old 11-16-2005, 08:01 AM
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cricket1961 cricket1961 is offline
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Adding "Foreign" Skin Texture

Nice talk going on here.
The one thing I need to add that I see is missing is that skin texture varies all over the face. The nose texture is different from the cheeks, which is different for the forehead etc.
You really can not make just one texture for a face, the pore differ that dramatically. You can always tell when someone has done something like this because the image looks to unreal when you look closely. There has to be variations.
Noise looks like noise no matter how many different types you layer on top of each other. Its not "honeycombed" enough. But it is a good means of adding some low level texture.
But in the end, the models skin texture should look like the texture that already exists.

Regards
Chris
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  #27  
Old 11-16-2005, 08:14 AM
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byRo byRo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cricket1961
The one thing I need to add that I see is missing is that skin texture varies all over the face. The nose texture is different from the cheeks, which is different for the forehead etc.
Agreed! Somebody in 3D world has probably done such a "mapping" of the different textures. I'll snoop around some more.

The image posted by NancyJ does exhibit different textures at different places, but I don't know if that because it uses a specific texture map for this model or some sort of mapped general procedural (calculated) shading.

Don't forget though that even if we get some realistic texture we still have to bend (conform) it to the surface of the face. Probably wouldn't need to be perfect, just not looking totally flat.

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  #28  
Old 11-16-2005, 08:53 AM
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NancyJ NancyJ is offline
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The picture I posted uses the best technique for getting realistic skin texture - photographs Its a texture map made out of high resolution photographs manipulated to fit the model. Poser isnt a very advanced rendering engine.
You can get some very good skin shaders for maya which use procedural layers , specular maps, colour maps, bump maps and are generally very complicated

But IMO theres never any need to give a model texture in her skin if it wasnt there in the first place.
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  #29  
Old 11-16-2005, 10:10 AM
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byRo byRo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NancyJ
But IMO theres never any need to give a model texture in her skin if it wasnt there in the first place.
Agreed. However there are cases where the texture just isn't there. We may have a battered old photo, a blow-out, or an image that needs replacement parts, then it would be nice to have a technique that would lend a bit of (false) realism.
(Obs: The best correction for over-zealous smoothing efforts is to start again and not be over-zealous in your smoothing efforts, OK?)

Photographic Texture Map vs. Procedural shaders:
As I understand it ....
- The former can give great (almost perfect) results but must be recreated for each model and may suffer from problems if the 3D lighting is too different from the original photographic lighting.
- The latter is not a perfect imitation of skin and can get quite complicated to understand but, on the other hand, once configured is very flexible to use.

Is that about right?

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  #30  
Old 11-16-2005, 10:42 AM
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NancyJ NancyJ is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by byRo
Photographic Texture Map vs. Procedural shaders:
As I understand it ....
- The former can give great (almost perfect) results but must be recreated for each model and may suffer from problems if the 3D lighting is too different from the original photographic lighting.
- The latter is not a perfect imitation of skin and can get quite complicated to understand but, on the other hand, once configured is very flexible to use.

Is that about right?

pretty much yeah. Texture maps are great but not very practical. Getting the photos in the first place is hard work - ie getting enough pictures to cover the whole body (first you need a filling nude if you're going for full body ) then you have the get the lighting completely neutral and flat whilst maintaining detail. Once you've got the photos you've got to turn them into a flat image to skin your model with and as you say that takes a lot of tweaking for individual models. Shaders are difficult to get to grips with but they're very versatile and becoming more advanced every day.
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