RetouchPRO

Go Back   RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Retouching
Register Blogs FAQ Site Nav Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Photo Retouching "Improving" photos, post-production, correction, etc.

Orange Peel Skin Texture - How to get

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 11-12-2005, 08:59 AM
ray12's Avatar
ray12 ray12 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 284
Orange Peel Skin Texture - How to get

There are times when after all my retrouching and healing - I end up with a Perfect but FLAT Complexion. I use dodge and burn to get some shading back in - and that helps some. But how do others get that orange peel "Pores" look in the skin? Obviously getting it there in the original photograph is helped by a good makeup artist.

Ive been thinking about making up a texture swatch that I could blend in afterwards using masks to control its application.

Does photoshop CS2 have any facility to do this directly?

Should I clone some textures from some very hi res images and re-use those.

Are there people out there who have such a skin texture library or swatch kit they use - and might be willing to share with the community?

We all get a little Flat at times - anyone have any textures to share?

Also - some tips on creating and storing textures ONLY might be a nice tutorial.

Thanks

Last edited by ray12; 11-29-2005 at 09:59 PM.
Reply With Quote top
  #2  
Old 11-12-2005, 12:18 PM
superfrasky superfrasky is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 74
I have similar problem ray12, and I m looking some textures from some very hi res images. Anyone know if its exist?
Reply With Quote top
  #3  
Old 11-12-2005, 12:21 PM
superfrasky superfrasky is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 74
This picture is from dior web page. This is a perfect retouched skin.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg image.JPG.jpg (82.3 KB, 2396 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #4  
Old 11-13-2005, 07:35 AM
shellby's Avatar
shellby shellby is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 299
the issue of skin - once again

Hello

Good to see another thread on skin!

That dior advert doesn't seem to have a lot of detail left in the pores. Some of their stuff has that hyper-real look where the skin looks perfectly smooth, but I noticed in a recent glossy mag that they are doing some of there adverts with a far more "realistic" look - by this I mean that you can actually see the pores.

I have never used another image to bring back the pores (I am interested to know more about this), but you can add noise. I have also heard of people creating brushes the size of pores and adding them back in.

There is a great thread on usind dodge and burn methods by Conrad.

Blurring is not used in pro retouching - I have heard this many times from retouchers who I have asked to crit my work and they can always tell when blurring has been used.
Reply With Quote top
  #5  
Old 11-13-2005, 01:08 PM
superfrasky superfrasky is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 74
Thks for your reply Shellby. Yes shellby everyone know how do it but anyone can make it. The dior image doesn't seem to have a lot of detail , but for the makeup industry is good. In this image, the reallism is total and pores.
Anyone know how do it?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg image2.jpg (42.9 KB, 1558 views)

Last edited by superfrasky; 11-13-2005 at 01:17 PM.
Reply With Quote top
  #6  
Old 11-13-2005, 04:45 PM
creeduk's Avatar
creeduk creeduk is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 297
To add pores afterwards or again I would think of looking for skin textures used by many 3D apps (bumpmaps) and try blending back into the image. I will dig through my 3D stuff see what turns up.
Reply With Quote top
  #7  
Old 11-13-2005, 05:14 PM
creeduk's Avatar
creeduk creeduk is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 297
Basically similar o what is suggested, the bumpmap for pores I have is basically a neutral grey background with some burned spots to make a seamless pattern the apply as an overlay. So similar to the noise suggestion. I exaggerated the effect so it would show up on this size.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg pores.jpg (34.4 KB, 1231 views)

Last edited by creeduk; 11-13-2005 at 05:38 PM.
Reply With Quote top
  #8  
Old 11-13-2005, 07:41 PM
ray12's Avatar
ray12 ray12 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 284
Thanks for all your inputs. I have been experimenting some in the meantime.

As I said - I can get the blemishes GONE with the heal brush.

I can use the new "surface blur" filter to get an even skin tone all over by blending the smoothed average tone back into the image thru the gentle use of masks.

I can get the shading to look good - both dark and light by using a 128 gray screen in overlay and using white and black airbrush to selectively get the edges of features and highlights to pop out - but the skin - still seemed to look "pasty" sometimes.

Here's what Ive been experimenting with: I just tried taking a super hi res picture of a model and looking for one with really good pores. I cut out this sample area, desaturated it to monocrome - and then level adjusted the chip to come in at a gray level 128 which is the netural overlay color.

When this pattern is used in an overlay or soft light mode - just the texture ONLY shows up on the model and it can be controlled in strength through opacity and by using a mask to feather any annoying edges out that might look out of place. You can even free transform it to have it fit at an angle or for creating smaller or larger size pores. I suppose you could even use warp on a layer to conform the texture patch better to the subject - say around the cheeks.

So far, Im liking the results - smooth, blended skin, blemish free with some highlights and shadows and now some texture too!

The swatches im making now are still somewhat small in size and I would need to work at making a bigger sheet of this "Real" skin pore texture. I am also seeing that pores on a forehead are somewhat different in pattern than on a cheek.

Maybe I end up making a good size texture overlay sheet for foreheads, another for cheeks. There is a special pattern of skin right under the eyes that is very unique and I suppose that a texture pattern of "under the eyes skin" could be found and created as well. I havent gotten this far tonite but maybe in the next couple of weeks I can begin to create these kinds of templates.

Am I on the right path here??

Any enhancements or any corrections to my thinking or process?

I would be especially interested in seeing what the 3D guys come up with for their animated character patterns for skin - maybe some of you might be able to paste a 600x800 sheet of texture for us to try out some. If a fractal program has already been written out to create these lifelike bumps and valleys - then maybe im re-creating the wheel here.

This post is pretty detailed and technical - I hope it meets some needs and creates some new frontiers in getting that "Great Look". I know ive been looking for it and working towards being able to create it myself for sometime now.

Maybe we can do a tutorial on a technique like this someday.

Thanks for your community spirited inputs. Thanks for your suggestions.

Ray

Last edited by ray12; 11-13-2005 at 08:15 PM.
Reply With Quote top
  #9  
Old 11-13-2005, 08:19 PM
maureeno maureeno is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by creeduk
Basically similar o what is suggested, the bumpmap for pores I have is basically a neutral grey background with some burned spots to make a seamless pattern the apply as an overlay. So similar to the noise suggestion. I exaggerated the effect so it would show up on this size.
How do you create a neutral gray background, Creeduk? Do you then add a bump texture to that?

Maureen
Reply With Quote top
  #10  
Old 11-14-2005, 05:49 AM
Cameraken's Avatar
Cameraken Cameraken is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Lancashire (UK)
Posts: 1,158
Hi Ray.

You may find this of use.

http://www.cslab.uky.edu/~lteri2/Fac.../introPage.htm

I think page 7 may be of help.

Sure is interesting reading

Ken
Reply With Quote top
  #11  
Old 11-14-2005, 07:36 AM
superfrasky superfrasky is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 74
Thanks ray12 for your reply. I so think that we can do a tutorial on a technique like this someday.
Thanks ray12
Reply With Quote top
  #12  
Old 11-14-2005, 08:29 AM
byRo's Avatar
byRo byRo is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Goianésia, Brazil
Posts: 1,609
Ray, you might find this thread interesting.

There Stroker posted a method, using three layers of noise, which can give good results.
I doubled the size of the posted image, used Stroker's method and masked the final stage (pores).

If you are interested on 3D skin then this might interest you. [Warning: might raise some eyebrows at work ]

You could say that the 3D folk actually have it a bit easier. Correct skin texture modelling depends on lighting and relative angles which they can calculate while we have to imagine.

Attached Images
File Type: jpg image[1]-texture-byRo.jpg (96.8 KB, 787 views)

Last edited by byRo; 11-14-2005 at 12:01 PM. Reason: karnt spel rite
Reply With Quote top
  #13  
Old 11-14-2005, 09:50 AM
ray12's Avatar
ray12 ray12 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 284
Thanks for the inputs - very helpful.

byRo - thanks for link - i think it takes us an additional step closer. The idea of doing a displacement map or an emboss on multiple layers of noise is great. The final image was pretty good.

cameraken - these 3d guys have really done their homework lately it seems. I wonder if they have some bump screens that we can use for glamour kinds of things. Could they create 2200x2200pix skin texture screens on a flat plane with their stuff?

Below is an example of one of the images I was working on. A couple. The goal was to enhance the image. Its not done yet - but here are 3 stages of development. Original, pasty, then with just a little skin texture borrowed from a celebrity hi res image i found - cheek texture only. Just FYI.

Keep the ideas coming - theyre really great.

Ray12
Attached Images
File Type: jpg couple1.jpg (98.4 KB, 896 views)
File Type: jpg couple2.jpg (91.6 KB, 907 views)
File Type: jpg couple3.jpg (93.5 KB, 1116 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #14  
Old 11-14-2005, 01:57 PM
Duv's Avatar
Duv Duv is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Nanaimo, British Columbia
Posts: 1,213
You might also have some success blending in natural textures such as this pane of ice that I blended into the image. Natural textures are more "chaotic" than maps and noise and may add a bit more realism.

Dave
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Ice.jpg (80.4 KB, 995 views)
File Type: jpg D-couple2 copy.jpg (95.5 KB, 803 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #15  
Old 11-14-2005, 02:14 PM
Panpan's Avatar
Panpan Panpan is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Gatineau, QC Canada
Posts: 352
If possible, I wanted to use the woman's own features instead of importing or creating them. The goal was to blur the freckles and to emphasize the pores at the same time.

I created overlay-mode high-pass layers for radii 1,2,5,6 and 9 of the wonan's skin only, omitting the larger facial features. I then inverted the radii 5 and 6 layers and duplicated the radii 1 and 2. By adjusting layer opacities, I got rid of most of the imperfections.

I put all the high-pass layers in a group and added a mask to that group. I used it to mask out the nostrils and the jaw line because the technique tends to put halos around strong edges.

I worked on the rest of the imperfections with the usual 10% white and black brushes on a soft-light layer (alt-click on the new layer icon; select soft light mode and checkmark 50% grey; press d for default color, select the brush tool and press 1 for 10%; paint on this layer to darken; press x to switch to lighten mode).

I left some imperfections to show what the high-pass technique will NOT do. Notice the low-frequency freckles on the bridge of the nose and on top of the cheekbone under her right eye. Notice also the two freckles on the jaw line because edges were omitted. Lastly, notice the lines under her right eye (I
fixed some, but not all). Those lines are too long to be affected by the small-radius blurring. They have to be fixed with the soft-light layer.

I feel this technique is a good time/quality compromise between high-end retouching where you have to spend hours dodging and burning versus blurring everything and recreating texture.

Pierre

P.S.: I have not seen this technique before. Surely it's not new?

Edit: I added the completed version
Attached Images
File Type: jpg couple1-panpan1.jpg (96.4 KB, 671 views)
File Type: jpg couple1-panpan2.jpg (99.7 KB, 851 views)

Last edited by Panpan; 11-14-2005 at 08:02 PM.
Reply With Quote top
  #16  
Old 11-15-2005, 06:02 AM
creeduk's Avatar
creeduk creeduk is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 297
Quote:
Originally Posted by maureeno
How do you create a neutral gray background, Creeduk? Do you then add a bump texture to that?

Maureen
Maureen there is an option under edit>fill... to select 50% gray this is neutral gray and when set to overlay does not show up. this allows you to creat a dodge and burn layer with out effecting the original image.
Reply With Quote top
  #17  
Old 11-15-2005, 08:33 AM
ray12's Avatar
ray12 ray12 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 284
Duv, great idea on the texture. Nice example. Who would think of Ice? Thanks for the pattern - it works nicely.

Panpan - I never tried that - it produced some really nice looking pores on the cheek.

Heres an update: Im beginning to further refine the technique how to use skin textures from existing glamour models. It allows me to extract just the "Texture Only" from the models skin and to place it anywhere I want to - on my very flat overly-airbrushed looking skin.

I'll try to see if I can explain it more simply. Im now getting it down to a workflow kind of technique.

Heres how: I locate a model that has the skin texture im looking for. I make a selection of it and copy it. I look for a large area of even texture.

I paste that into my pasty looking picture on a new layer above where I want to use it and turn the blend mode of that layer to overlay. On that new layer I use the Hue-Saturation-Levels adjustment (control - U) to bring the saturation of the texture patch all the way down to black and white. Then I use the level control to bring the luminance of the patch down or up to exactly 128 gray (50% gray is the same). This is the perfect overlay color because now all that shows up is the "texture only". I use the "Color Sampler Tool" (Under the eyedropper in the toolbox to measure the level so its exactly 128 - otherwise the patch will not blend well). Voi-la! Now I have a repositionable texture only patch that I can use anywhere in my new image.

I usually end up putting a mask together with the texture so I can get nice smooth blended edges and I control its strength using the opacity slider.

Heres the great part - when im done using this texture patch to fix up the texture in the left cheek, I hit Duplicate Layer (Control - J) to get a new layer of the patch. I then slide this new layer over to the right cheek or forehead. I adjust the opacity for strength or I touch up my mask with a white or black brush to further blend in the texture. Each time I use the patch it has been refined from the step before it - so this second patch usually ends up requiring even less work to get it to look nice. Life is good.


Im still looking for texture screens or texture bumps - or especially - how to make them.

How are the 3D guys coming? Can anyone create a large plane of skin pore or forehead texture? There's got to be some kind of special math-matical formula out there somewhere!!!

Ray12

Last edited by ray12; 11-15-2005 at 01:58 PM.
Reply With Quote top
  #18  
Old 11-15-2005, 08:44 AM
Cassidy Cassidy is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Australia
Posts: 1,104
Have to laugh, today waiting in doctor's office, started perusing the mags on the table, mostly inspecting the skin textures on the ads, lol
Reply With Quote top
  #19  
Old 11-15-2005, 08:48 AM
ray12's Avatar
ray12 ray12 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 284
We are strange puppies!!! I do the same kind of thing at check-out lines.

Last edited by ray12; 11-15-2005 at 01:59 PM.
Reply With Quote top
  #20  
Old 11-15-2005, 08:57 AM
NancyJ's Avatar
NancyJ NancyJ is offline
Senior Member
Patron
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 729
Quote:
Originally Posted by ray12
How are the 3D guys coming? Can anyone create a large plane of skin pore or forehead texture? There's got to be some kind of special math-matical formula out there somewhere!!!

Ray12
http://www.cache.daz3d.com/store/ite...02/popup_2.jpg

and thats just poser - couldnt find any Maya renders and I'm not at home right now.
Reply With Quote top
  #21  
Old 11-15-2005, 10:27 AM
maureeno maureeno is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 214
Here are some for download purchase:

http://www.turbosquid.com/Search/Ind...Key=human+skin

This one is really nice:

http://www.turbosquid.com/FullPrevie....cfm/ID/272019

Last edited by maureeno; 11-15-2005 at 10:40 AM.
Reply With Quote top
  #22  
Old 11-15-2005, 01:30 PM
ray12's Avatar
ray12 ray12 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 284
NancyJ and Maureeno - Great stuff. Nice Finds.

Nancy J - the link to the photo you gave is incredible - it has all the textures figured out - I was especially impressed with the ability to re-create eye line wrinkles realistically!!

How could we be able to use this stuff??

Just like a lot of people are not familiar with the intracacies of retouching or photoshop masks - Im not familiar on how to warp a grid into a 3D person. Its almost like we would need an intermediary. The programs have to have a real strong learning curve. I would like to have a small sub-section of what they have to offer - the grain and wrinkle patterns around facial features as textures.

Maureeno - I looked at the textures for sale - and have to do some more browsing to see and understand which ones would be of interest. To pay 4 to 10 bucks for a template that could be re-used would be very cost efficient. Id be looking for cheek texture, eye lines and forehead and general body skin texture.

A good sheet of that stuff could be warped or masked or displacement mapped pretty nicely to add that texture back to our over zealous smoothing efforts. Cool stuff.

Im starting to look at some Nagle textured brushes - Dont know how to use them to their fullest yet - but there are some 30 to 60 skin related brushes from what I can see on the main download page. They are free if you have the insight and artistry on how to use them smartly. Its amazing how little I know about so much - even in just this one little area.

Ray 12
Reply With Quote top
  #23  
Old 11-15-2005, 08:50 PM
RooB's Avatar
RooB RooB is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by byRo
If you are interested on 3D skin then this might interest you.
I love 3D work, and I have used software like that here and there, when needed, to interject a little something into my work.

If you're interested, check out Blender3D, a free 3D renderer.
http://www.blender.org/cms/Home.2.0.html

I did a fair bit of basic 3D compositing for a landscaper-- I would take a 2D image of a house, and then build and render 3D elements into the landscape such as bridges, decks, outdoor lamps, etc. There are things you can achieve in 3D in a short order of time that would take days to do working in 2D, and if you make a mistake in perspective it is just a matter of tilting things in 3D space and re-rendering.

People, now, they're something else. Rendering people in 3D is fairly easy, but rendering people in 3D so the lighting is natural and looks good is very complicated, on top of that, to render realistic lights and shadows in 3D can take hours of time to render an image for even our fastest computers.

I've included a render I was working on awhile ago, trying to achieve a little realism in my 3D rendering with a single light-- when it comes to complicated 3D, I'm very much a beginner. But, it's still a lot of fun to get involved with.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Render_Roob.jpg (62.1 KB, 351 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #24  
Old 11-15-2005, 08:51 PM
Klaatu Baradda's Avatar
Klaatu Baradda Klaatu Baradda is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Recently moved to a condo on Omicron Persii 8
Posts: 44
Pooring On The Pores

Greetings All,
Here's another approach that is perhaps a bit more direct in creating skin texture (particularly pores) without a lot of hullabaloo.

1) Create a new layer (above your model's face) and Fill it with 50% gray (Edit>Fill>50% Gray)
2) Add Noise (10%-Gaussian-monochromatic)
3) Go to Filter>Stylize>Emboss (135°/2/100)
4) Set the layer blending to Overlay
5) Add a mask to the layer with "Hide All" (i.e., filled with black)
6) Grab a soft brush, low opacity (10%) and set foreground color to white.

Now, paint on the mask where you want the pores to show. Typically, this will be stronger in the darker or shadow areas of a face.

Of course, you can tweak the Noise and Emboss layer to be smaller or larger pores OR you can alway grab a photo of skin, desaturate it, use it as the embossed layer and carry on with the other steps.
Reply With Quote top
  #25  
Old 11-16-2005, 04:01 AM
byRo's Avatar
byRo byRo is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Goianésia, Brazil
Posts: 1,609
3D Folks

Interesting to see that some RtP buddies have also been dabbling in 3D stuff.
I, myself, am still scaling the learning curves of Blender and Poser.

[hijack ]

Besides making skin texture, I've been thinking of two other interactions between the 2D and 3D worlds:
1) Filling in missing parts: When an image is missing a part (a hand, maybe), we may have to browse through hundreds of images trying to find a hand that has the right pose and lighting - why not just pose and light one ourselves, in Poser?

2) Restoration (Modelling): If an image is very badly damaged but we can still make out enough features then, instead of trying to fix up the old image, just make a
new one conforming to all the features that we can still see. (doesn't seem possible yet - at least not with Poser / Blender, but someday we'll get there)
[/hijack]

Reply With Quote top
  #26  
Old 11-16-2005, 07:01 AM
cricket1961's Avatar
cricket1961 cricket1961 is offline
RetouchPRO LIVE Guest Artist
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Flower Mound, Texas
Posts: 488
Blog Entries: 38
Adding "Foreign" Skin Texture

Nice talk going on here.
The one thing I need to add that I see is missing is that skin texture varies all over the face. The nose texture is different from the cheeks, which is different for the forehead etc.
You really can not make just one texture for a face, the pore differ that dramatically. You can always tell when someone has done something like this because the image looks to unreal when you look closely. There has to be variations.
Noise looks like noise no matter how many different types you layer on top of each other. Its not "honeycombed" enough. But it is a good means of adding some low level texture.
But in the end, the models skin texture should look like the texture that already exists.

Regards
Chris
Reply With Quote top
  #27  
Old 11-16-2005, 07:14 AM
byRo's Avatar
byRo byRo is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Goianésia, Brazil
Posts: 1,609
Quote:
Originally Posted by cricket1961
The one thing I need to add that I see is missing is that skin texture varies all over the face. The nose texture is different from the cheeks, which is different for the forehead etc.
Agreed! Somebody in 3D world has probably done such a "mapping" of the different textures. I'll snoop around some more.

The image posted by NancyJ does exhibit different textures at different places, but I don't know if that because it uses a specific texture map for this model or some sort of mapped general procedural (calculated) shading.

Don't forget though that even if we get some realistic texture we still have to bend (conform) it to the surface of the face. Probably wouldn't need to be perfect, just not looking totally flat.

Reply With Quote top
  #28  
Old 11-16-2005, 07:53 AM
NancyJ's Avatar
NancyJ NancyJ is offline
Senior Member
Patron
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 729
The picture I posted uses the best technique for getting realistic skin texture - photographs Its a texture map made out of high resolution photographs manipulated to fit the model. Poser isnt a very advanced rendering engine.
You can get some very good skin shaders for maya which use procedural layers , specular maps, colour maps, bump maps and are generally very complicated

But IMO theres never any need to give a model texture in her skin if it wasnt there in the first place.
Reply With Quote top
  #29  
Old 11-16-2005, 09:10 AM
byRo's Avatar
byRo byRo is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Goianésia, Brazil
Posts: 1,609
Quote:
Originally Posted by NancyJ
But IMO theres never any need to give a model texture in her skin if it wasnt there in the first place.
Agreed. However there are cases where the texture just isn't there. We may have a battered old photo, a blow-out, or an image that needs replacement parts, then it would be nice to have a technique that would lend a bit of (false) realism.
(Obs: The best correction for over-zealous smoothing efforts is to start again and not be over-zealous in your smoothing efforts, OK?)

Photographic Texture Map vs. Procedural shaders:
As I understand it ....
- The former can give great (almost perfect) results but must be recreated for each model and may suffer from problems if the 3D lighting is too different from the original photographic lighting.
- The latter is not a perfect imitation of skin and can get quite complicated to understand but, on the other hand, once configured is very flexible to use.

Is that about right?

Reply With Quote top
  #30  
Old 11-16-2005, 09:42 AM
NancyJ's Avatar
NancyJ NancyJ is offline
Senior Member
Patron
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 729
Quote:
Originally Posted by byRo
Photographic Texture Map vs. Procedural shaders:
As I understand it ....
- The former can give great (almost perfect) results but must be recreated for each model and may suffer from problems if the 3D lighting is too different from the original photographic lighting.
- The latter is not a perfect imitation of skin and can get quite complicated to understand but, on the other hand, once configured is very flexible to use.

Is that about right?

pretty much yeah. Texture maps are great but not very practical. Getting the photos in the first place is hard work - ie getting enough pictures to cover the whole body (first you need a filling nude if you're going for full body ) then you have the get the lighting completely neutral and flat whilst maintaining detail. Once you've got the photos you've got to turn them into a flat image to skin your model with and as you say that takes a lot of tweaking for individual models. Shaders are difficult to get to grips with but they're very versatile and becoming more advanced every day.
Reply With Quote top
  #31  
Old 11-16-2005, 10:40 AM
meok meok is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Montreal
Posts: 45
This is a very interesting tread. I always felt that to get good (natural) texture you have to start with a file with decently good texture to start with. Introducing pores where there was none can affect the balance of the image. The lack of pores can often indicate that the area is out of focus, thus adding texture can make it look "off" from its surrounding and therefore, will not create an homogeneous result.

When I have an original file with decent skin texture, I usually retouch at the pore level by dodging, burning and cloning until I get an uniform texture. To emphasize them, I usually do some blending of the weak plate.Thats the technique I used for this: http://byloc.com/minifolio/page2/page2.html It is pretty time-consuming technique tho, so Im sure some the pro retouchers here have a more efficient way.
Reply With Quote top
  #32  
Old 11-16-2005, 11:21 AM
superfrasky superfrasky is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 74
Meok, interesting method. Can you explain more detailed? Thanks!
Reply With Quote top
  #33  
Old 11-16-2005, 02:09 PM
Klaatu Baradda's Avatar
Klaatu Baradda Klaatu Baradda is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Recently moved to a condo on Omicron Persii 8
Posts: 44
Texture Terminology

Quote:
Originally Posted by cricket1961
The one thing I need to add that I see is missing is that skin texture varies all over the face. The nose texture is different from the cheeks, which is different for the forehead etc.
Completely agree.
Actually, the technique we outlined (above) DOES allow you to vary the amount of texture in different areas of the face. It also provides control over the depth and density of the texture by "painting" with a low opacity brush on a mask. Additionally, you can also play with the layer Opacity if you desire the effect to be heavier or lighter.

(Warning: Lengthy discussion below)
There may be a bit of confusion over the terms we're using for skin texture. So, for the sake of clarity, let's try to better define what we're talking about.

Skin Texture 101
As you point out Chris, one of the variations in skin texture is that it is "different" all over the face and you used the example of the "nose" versus the "cheeks". This is a great observation and we would add to this that there is also a "commonality" for an individual's facial skin texture. Namely the "density" of the pores (we'll define what we mean by density below). However, we would pose the question, "WHAT" is specifically "different" about the skin texture in these various regions? The answer, we believe, is in the "depth" of the pores.

Whenever you look closely at facial skin texture (really closely), you'll notice that it is actually a diagonal criss-cross or a "lattice complex" (see the exaggerated examples below). To the naked-eye, the lattice can be made up of strong creases or nearly invisible ones. The "points" (nodes) where the lattice "crosses" each other is where there is a "pore." At their most discrete level, these pores are arranged in an approximate "diamond" configuration, with pores at each corner of the diamond.

Stepping back from the face, the microscopic lattice typically falls away while the pores (nodes) are still slightly visible (although, these too are starting to fall away) and may now appear more visually random. They're not really random though. Notice how the pores still follow the lattice and are "stacked" in a diamond pattern?

SMOOTHNESS
When skin is seemingly "smooth" this doesn't mean the skin is without "pores!" It simply means the pores are "less visible." The reasons for this, however, may not be so obvious. They're less visible because, their "depth" has been diminished (not necessarily their size or density, which are fairly constant). This "smoothing" or "diminishing" can be achieved with makeup, cosmetic skin treatments and naturally, in photography, through digital manipulation.

SIZE
Some confusion ensues with the use of the term, "size." Presummably what is meant by the actual "size" of pores is how "large" the circle (dot) of each might be visible. From a distance these will only look like very small dots. The stronger (darker) the dots, the "deeper" the pores appears to be. But does this mean that the pores are larger or simply deeper?

In actuallity there are two factors here; the "size" of the dot and the "darkness" of it. These are two factors which can change what we perceive of the texture. Yet both of these contribute to what we could generally term as the "depth" of the pores. So, the use of the term "size" is a bit ambiguous to use in reference to skin texture and pores in general. Probably best to steer-clear of this term all together.

DENSITY
On the other hand, the "distance" the diamond points (pores) are from each other is fairly consistent from face to face. We call this distance of the pores, "density" to refer to their collective visual pattern. In fact, arbitrarily varying this distance all around a face would probably look quite artificial. Whereas, keeping the pore "density" constant, while varying their "depth," is closer to what happens in reality.

Considering Angles
Of course, since a face has angles AND because photos are 2 dimensional, these distances WILL visually vary depending on what angle they're being viewed. In the reality, however, the individual's pore density is constant. It's just the angle which varies. So, some density compensation is necessary, depending on the face and angles that are visible. The more acute the angle, the closer together the pores will appear. Yet, too large of a variation of density in the wrong places can begin to look fake as well. Therefore, delicate treatment is required here for a more realistic and natural texture. Displacement maps are perhaps useful here, although, argueably more effort than would be necessary to emulate the effect.

DEPTH
So, what is "depth"? Depth (in this context) is the strength of lightness/darkness seen in the pores and lattice complex of the texture. The darker the pores and lattice, the "deeper" the texture will appear. However, if you look closer at a pore, it has highlights as well as shadows. This is what truly gives the pores their feeling of "depth" since the presence of both "highlights & shadows" provide the foundation of 3D rendering.

Strength & Contrast
The strength of a highlight is in it's "lightness" and the strength of a shadow is in it's "darkenss." Whereas, the relative "depth" of these is in their "contrast" to each other. In other words, the lower the contrast, the less "depth" is perceived. The higher the contrast, the greater the "depth" is perceived.

On The Edge Of Shadows
Typically, the areas of the face that are in greater shadow will appear to give the pores along the shadow's feathered transition-edge a greater contrast and thus a greater depth. Therefore, increasing the visibility of pores around shadowed regions (particularly at their transistion-edges) gives a more realistic appearance to the texture. Obviously, the pores that are at the heart of the shadowed areas will be too dark to see and the pores that are in the facial highlights will be too light (i.e., "blown-out") to see. For this reason, it's simply easier to focus your efforts on those shadow transition-edges where light is "washing over" the face and rolling into shadow.

Subtlety
On a subtle and nearly subliminial level, the "hint" of a lattice pattern over large open areas of skin, make it look more even, blemish-free, and attractive. This means that any work a retoucher does with regard to skin "texture" must be subtle; only hinting at it.

The Painting Advantage
This is where "painting the skin texture" using the method we outlined above (or a similar one) can provide greater control of these necessary "hints" of texture by the amount and depth through the use of a low opacity (soft) brush on a mask.

An added bonus of this technique is that this is a "non-destructive" method which allows you to go back and "add or remove" your texture on-the-fly by simply pressing the "x" key to swap foreground and background colors (black & white) while painting.

As an alternative method, you could also have a series of skin textures (desaturated) in your Patterns file and Fill a layer with this pattern then follow our method from step 4 onward.

Additionally, you could Fill a layer with 50% gray and apply a Pattern Overlay layer Style using the "skin texture" pattern and set the style's blending mode to Overlay (this gives you a real-time view of the texture over your image). You can also adjust the Scale of the texture to better match the face (this is a big plus). Then follow step 5 onward.

The Dior photo looks like it used a very similar technique.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Skintextures.jpg (46.5 KB, 516 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #34  
Old 11-16-2005, 03:51 PM
superfrasky superfrasky is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 74
Good job Klaatu.... Really its great!
Reply With Quote top
  #35  
Old 11-16-2005, 04:14 PM
Duv's Avatar
Duv Duv is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Nanaimo, British Columbia
Posts: 1,213
Oh my! I really must go out and smash my piece of ice!

Dave
Reply With Quote top
  #36  
Old 11-16-2005, 04:44 PM
RooB's Avatar
RooB RooB is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by byRo
Agreed! Somebody in 3D world has probably done such a "mapping" of the different textures. I'll snoop around some more.
Check out http://www.daz3d.com. They sell all kinds of maps and characters for Poser models. From cartoonish to quite realistic.

http://www.renderosity.com is an excellent place to pick up and get started in 3D as well, they provide a lot of tutorials and content.
Reply With Quote top
  #37  
Old 11-16-2005, 05:12 PM
Klaatu Baradda's Avatar
Klaatu Baradda Klaatu Baradda is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Recently moved to a condo on Omicron Persii 8
Posts: 44
How REAL Do You Want To Get?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Duv
Oh my! I really must go out and smash my piece of ice! Dave
Not so, Dave!
Your texture looks really very good as a skin texture map (we downloaded it for future reference) and would also work well with the method we outlined above (although, it should be desaturated for best results). In fact, using it as a desaturated Pattern would work really well too.

Naturally, there are a ton of ways to get similar results.

In the end, it all depends on how critical your need is for realism. On low resolution images for the web, the need is probably not that critical. For glossy magazine ads or large format work, the bar would probably be a bit higher.
Reply With Quote top
  #38  
Old 11-16-2005, 05:51 PM
Duv's Avatar
Duv Duv is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Nanaimo, British Columbia
Posts: 1,213
Oh great! I should submit all the pieces and see if someone can put it back together again! A terrific restoration project.

Dave
Reply With Quote top
  #39  
Old 11-16-2005, 06:43 PM
ray12's Avatar
ray12 ray12 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 284
Great Discussion. Sure learning a lot.

I agree with Klaatu. For me - at different times - there is a wide range of need for quality, accuracy or maybe even speed. It depends on the present project, the customer and its end use.

Ive already been able to utilize Daves ice pattern - and it worked out fine for that particular use.

Everyone in this forum is at a different level of expertise from tinkerer to advanced. Im appreciating the breadth of ideas - everyone is open and sharing ideas.

Who's got some patterns for eyes, cheeks and foreheads?

Who's got another piece of this puzzle?

Ray12

Last edited by ray12; 11-16-2005 at 07:34 PM.
Reply With Quote top
  #40  
Old 11-16-2005, 08:01 PM
Panpan's Avatar
Panpan Panpan is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Gatineau, QC Canada
Posts: 352
Meok gave a great example of high end retouching. Here is my version with the compromise technique I explained earlier in this thread. It took fifteen minutes.

This discussion of artificial skin techniques is fascinating, but when there is natural, usable texture as there is in the original photograph, why resort to them?

Pierre
Attached Images
File Type: jpg page2_10-panpan1.jpg (96.4 KB, 466 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #41  
Old 11-16-2005, 10:08 PM
ray12's Avatar
ray12 ray12 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 284
Panpan, your right. If there is original texture - no problem,

Sometimes I want to enhance the texture in a specific area. Sometimes as I explained in the starter thread, my smoothing efforts leave me with a flatter more pasty image than I would like. Im at an intermediate level - and I would like to advance in the craft to be able to do the more high end texture work.

There is also commercial demand for the "Enhanced Reality" or a "Fantasy" look - some people equate that look with some celebrity looks they have seen. Its above the ordinary look and people are saying they enjoy the polished look. One or two levels of polish makes people stand out from the crowd.

Im developing some techniques on my own to create this polished look - and this thread hopefully will give us all some ideas on how to get one or two steps beyond where we presently are. Im totally enjoying the expertise here.

Ray 12
Reply With Quote top
  #42  
Old 11-17-2005, 03:59 AM
byRo's Avatar
byRo byRo is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Goianésia, Brazil
Posts: 1,609
Klaatu, thank you very much for the 101 course. Is there going to be a test?

The criss-cross texture you mentioned really got my mind racing.
1) Make a nice diamond pattern;
2) Put in a bit of distortion, to look a bit more natural;
3) Size and wrap it around the face;
4) Mask for different regions of the face;
5) Mask for the shadow / highlight transition;
6) Add some blotches, freckles and spots (guess those are in Skin 201).

Can't wait to have a bash!

Uh Oh, Duv's coming to tell me to get some sand between the toes,
see you later...

Reply With Quote top
  #43  
Old 11-17-2005, 06:34 AM
Stroker's Avatar
Stroker Stroker is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 370
Here's a taste of painting uber 3d skin:
"Dr Julian's Texturing Tutorial" by Julian Jeremy Johnson-Mortimer.

Quote:
A good thing about painting an old persons texture you don't have to be so neat and precise, I find the hardest texture to paint is a attractive female face.
Heh.

Last edited by Stroker; 11-17-2005 at 06:39 AM.
Reply With Quote top
  #44  
Old 11-17-2005, 07:51 AM
ray12's Avatar
ray12 ray12 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 284
Stroker, this is exactly what ive been looking for. The link you gave above just had a great tutorial on Maya and Photoshop together to create facial texture.

Looks like I might have to look into working with maya some - its pretty involved - but im only after a part of it.

Below is the kind of facial map I was hoping somebody might have have created.

This one is pretty "ugly" because its a texture map of a really ugly and old geezer - dont have many retouch requests for that kind of subject --- but - - - maybe someone can create some nice high glamour maps for us in maya and share them here.

FYI - Posted is the original texture and color map and then a 50% texture map that is meant to be used in overlay mode in photoshop as examples. The eye lines are there - the forehead is the correct kind of texture pattern - and the cheeks are another correct kind of pattern. But be careful - the included potmarks, blemishes, veins and facial stubble on this one dont lend themselves easily to a high glam evaluation right off the bat.

I would want to make up some simple smooth ones with just the basic lines in them in a couple of densities and maybe 2 or 3 poses (straight, left and right). I could then use parts of those texture patterns to mask and blend into the photos I play with. Thanks Stroker.

Ray12
Attached Images
File Type: jpg map1.jpg (99.4 KB, 127 views)
File Type: jpg map2.jpg (90.5 KB, 173 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #45  
Old 11-17-2005, 10:23 AM
ray12's Avatar
ray12 ray12 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 284
Sorry for taking up so much bandwidth so often here - But this is getting fun.

I purchased a 3D face texture mask from one of the links off of Strokers post.

It is an 18x18 inch face with the correct textures for the whole face. Its big enough and clean enough to work on an 8x10.

Ill post a quick down and dirty test shot below.

I took the B+W 3D jpeg mask and placed it in a layer above my overly-smoothed image and placed the layer in overlay mode. I added a black mask to the overlay layer and painted in "just" the texture areas that I wanted with a white brush. I was able to control the shape and extent of the textures by painting with a low opacity brush and by rotating the mask with free transform. Once I did one eye - I duplicated the mask and did the same for the other eye - that way I get total control. The cheeks came in pretty much OK by themselves. I did a bit of toning and I was done. I left it a bit overdone so it shows up better here.

This will be great for the times when I have to oversmooth the skin textures and colors and yet still want to get a shot that looks like i didnt use any of that unprofessional blurring stuff that the so called amateurs use!!

There are 11 ways to skin a cat in photoshop - so there are many other great ideas out there to get great looking retouches.

Ray12
Attached Images
File Type: jpg pasty.jpg (62.2 KB, 464 views)
File Type: jpg textured.jpg (72.8 KB, 539 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #46  
Old 11-17-2005, 11:37 AM
creeduk's Avatar
creeduk creeduk is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 297
Maya may not be the way to go, it is a hard system to get to grips with (have used it on and off) but for glamour there is far more contenet available for a program called poser. Many skins especially faces and makeup have been done for poser, just google for the content you will be amazed how much is out there and many for free.
Reply With Quote top
  #47  
Old 11-17-2005, 01:54 PM
superfrasky superfrasky is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 74
Poser

yes!... Poser can be a good option for real 3d skin. In this example the realism is total (skin with pores) and good look!.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Message173422.jpg (54.7 KB, 307 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #48  
Old 11-18-2005, 12:14 PM
superfrasky superfrasky is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 74
A good site with skin retouch. Very very good!
http://philippesalomon.com/
Reply With Quote top
  #49  
Old 11-18-2005, 02:19 PM
scsi scsi is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 6
Don't want to make any advertisments, but there's a Software at daz3d.com called Daz-Studio. It's a very nice Programm to start with Poser stuff. And it's free.
Look here..
http://www.daz3d.com/program/studio/1_0index.php

mfG. scsi
Reply With Quote top
  #50  
Old 11-18-2005, 03:17 PM
cricket1961's Avatar
cricket1961 cricket1961 is offline
RetouchPRO LIVE Guest Artist
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Flower Mound, Texas
Posts: 488
Blog Entries: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by creeduk
Maureen there is an option under edit>fill... to select 50% gray this is neutral gray and when set to overlay does not show up. this allows you to creat a dodge and burn layer with out effecting the original image.

Also, if you option click the new layer icon at the bottom of the layer palette, it will come up with the dialog box that allows you to name, select whatever blend mode, and the check box for filling with a neutral grey all at the same time.
This also works for adjustment layers(with no neutral fill).

Chris
Reply With Quote top
  #51  
Old 11-19-2005, 11:51 PM
rnbluvva's Avatar
rnbluvva rnbluvva is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: In Your Heart
Posts: 271
That looks great Ray! I will have to look into those texture maps. I wonder if they have them for different age ranges as the pore size tends to enlarge with age.

Very interesting stuff.
Reply With Quote top
  #52  
Old 11-21-2005, 11:14 AM
ray12's Avatar
ray12 ray12 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 284
I made up a re-usable texture template from the basic 3D skin texture.

You can get the size of the pores to get bigger by using the image transform or the warp tools.

If you use a black mask with your skin texture layer - you can take your white pen and control the amount of the texture, the exact position and extent of the texture area and the overall density of each area of texture. So, If you need larger pores - just scale the layer up a little bit until it looks like what you want to see.

It seems like this new skin texture method im experimenting with- visually pulls the image together and adds its own kind of smoothness blend to the final image. Its almost like applying a final coat of makeup or fixative to the image - all the blends end up looking smoother with just a little bit of texture added to them. When I add the final texture screen - another level of transformation seems to take place.

Ray12

Last edited by ray12; 11-21-2005 at 11:30 AM.
Reply With Quote top
  #53  
Old 11-21-2005, 11:27 AM
Klaatu Baradda's Avatar
Klaatu Baradda Klaatu Baradda is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Recently moved to a condo on Omicron Persii 8
Posts: 44
The Perils Of Thread-Skimming

Quote:
Originally Posted by ray12
If you use a black mask with your skin texture layer - you can take your white pen and control the amount, the exact position and the overall density of each area of texture.
Hmmm... this sounds vaguely familiar. Now, where did we hear that before?
Reply With Quote top
  #54  
Old 11-21-2005, 12:56 PM
ray12's Avatar
ray12 ray12 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 284
Hi Klaatu, I acknowledge you are certainly way ahead of me in this skin area- especially the 101 thread! That was awsome. Thanks.

As I re-read some of the stuff you shared - and while I was focused on chasing 3d texture ideas around - I see you did share some great stuff. I havent been doing noise and emboss techniques so it didnt dawn on me that you had shared several masking steps also. Ive been using masks for years to control images - its a common technique - BUT - never so much as in this new area of delicate texture control. Masks are ending up being so essential to the end result - and the process of getting there.

Yes i think you are right. It does seem that you did share a great masking technique first. Thank you!

I think whats important is that to get this very modern brushed or textured look - one needs to be using selective masking. Its where the artistry of the technique lies. Without it - you cant easily, or predictably, get the control to get the look. Anyone who wants the look - is probably going to have to use the black mask, white pen, overlay, texture routine. Thanks for sharing.

Your posts are definately worth a re-read - good stuff.

Last edited by ray12; 11-28-2005 at 11:06 PM.
Reply With Quote top
  #55  
Old 11-22-2005, 07:09 AM
Craig_H Craig_H is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Western Australia
Posts: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by superfrasky
Thks for your reply Shellby. Yes shellby everyone know how do it but anyone can make it. The dior image doesn't seem to have a lot of detail , but for the makeup industry is good. In this image, the reallism is total and pores.
Anyone know how do it?
I don't think it looks realistic at all. Skin pores aren't all the same size and evenly spaced like in that image. It just doesn't look right for some reason. Don't get me wrong, it's done well and you can tell there has been a copious amount of time put into the image - but it's just not realistic.

I always retouch on separate layers, merge them then drop the opacity over the original images (minus blemishes of course!). This ensures the subject's natural skin characteristics comes through in the retouch. Anything beyond that is bordering on the edge of a "fantasy makeover" in my opinion.

Below is an example of a reasonably quick retouch from some time ago. I haven't touched my camera for over 6 months and now I've pretty much forgotten my retouching workflow. Time to find a new process!

http://members.iinet.net.au/~craighi...ch_example.jpg
Reply With Quote top
  #56  
Old 11-27-2005, 09:33 AM
sarbeka sarbeka is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: beirut , lebanon
Posts: 9
Lightbulb Orange Peel Skin Texture - How to get

to ray12.

to get orange peel skin texture,in the photoshop cs/cs2 go to toolbar-click image and open Adjustments ,click on photo filter chose the orange color ( CLICK THE ARROW DOWN AN CHOOSE THE COLOR YOU WANT) a very easy step.

sarbeka
Reply With Quote top
  #57  
Old 11-28-2005, 05:55 AM
superfrasky superfrasky is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarbeka
to ray12.

to get orange peel skin texture,in the photoshop cs/cs2 go to toolbar-click image and open Adjustments ,click on photo filter chose the orange color ( CLICK THE ARROW DOWN AN CHOOSE THE COLOR YOU WANT) a very easy step.

sarbeka
¿?... I DONT KNOW IT!!!!!!!!

Last edited by superfrasky; 11-28-2005 at 09:01 AM. Reason: a very easy step and for a larger thread....
Reply With Quote top
  #58  
Old 11-28-2005, 01:41 PM
Duv's Avatar
Duv Duv is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Nanaimo, British Columbia
Posts: 1,213
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarbeka
to ray12.

to get orange peel skin texture,in the photoshop cs/cs2 go to toolbar-click image and open Adjustments ,click on photo filter chose the orange color ( CLICK THE ARROW DOWN AN CHOOSE THE COLOR YOU WANT) a very easy step.

sarbeka
As far as I know Photo Filters might be able to give your skin the color of an orange (which I don't think we want) and doesn't have the ability to add or provide texture. ???

Cheers

Dave
Reply With Quote top
  #59  
Old 11-28-2005, 04:03 PM
shellby's Avatar
shellby shellby is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 299
Photo filters in photoshop

Photo filters in photoshop are there to emulate the traditional photo filters that you actually fit onto the front of the camera lens of a SLR camera. They alter the colour eg a Warm up filters and Cooling filters (orange and blue)
Reply With Quote top
  #60  
Old 11-28-2005, 11:35 PM
ray12's Avatar
ray12 ray12 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 284
Im finding that these orange/brown/gold colors for me are coming from the overlay process itself. No color correction is necessary.

What ive been doing lately is taking a black layer above my main image - then I paint on white blotches under the eyes where I want a highlighted skin look - and on the chin - or shoulder - or on the cheeks to emulate a kicker light. These white splotches can be hard brused on - because - I have been applying gaussian blur to the splotch layer and adjusting it so that the slpotches have a nice smooth gradation from white to black. These white patches provide the brightened highlights in the skin area - and since they are smoothed - they blend in very nicely. They almost look like a photographers lighting effect. I like the etherial and polished look it gives.

But here is the other part - when I overlay this layer (or soft light blend it) - the whites produce the highlights - and the black area of the background browns out the shadows - makes them deep and ruddy - makes them brown and accented. It actually creates that red/gold/brown color you see in the Dior pictures. Of course, you can adjust its depth and color with opacity, or better yet, create a mask and paint on this really great looking skin shadow color exactly where you want it - and adjust your pen opacity.

Im getting quite satisfied with the use of existing skin textures from hi-res models pictures - or the realistic 3D textures im finding. With this new (for me) black and white overlay layer - im able to get the great highlights and the dark ruddy skin shadows I see in Dior pictures. The overly smooth skin is initially produced using the new surface blur in CS2 (5 times smoother than median). And when I add on the texture layer at the last step - its almost like it pulls it all together.

Still learning - anyone have some nice copy permitted glam type pictures we can practice on in the forum without infringing.
Reply With Quote top
  #61  
Old 11-29-2005, 06:48 AM
superfrasky superfrasky is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 74
A good site about glamour and fashion retouch, and with sample about workflow

http://www.onemodelplace.com/newslet...ticle7_pg2.cfm
Reply With Quote top
  #62  
Old 12-31-2005, 02:44 AM
ray12's Avatar
ray12 ray12 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 284
Here is a quick example of smooth blending with a soft texture. Its from another part of the forum. I used textures to keep from getting an overly smoothed "pasty" look.

I used "surface blur" to smooth out the skin.

Then added a "Soft Light" layer above the main image with blurred black and white areas to get the dark cheeks and the highlights.

Then added in some skin texture from a "Soft Light layer" that had a skin texture map on it. Blended this texture into the image using a mask.

Attached are examples of what the skin texture patches look like - and how to use them.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg patch examples.jpg (94.9 KB, 394 views)
File Type: jpg becky12BFA5372.jpg (99.6 KB, 390 views)

Last edited by ray12; 01-12-2006 at 04:12 PM.
Reply With Quote top
  #63  
Old 01-04-2006, 07:02 AM
Jeronimas Jeronimas is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by meok
This is a very interesting tread. I always felt that to get good (natural) texture you have to start with a file with decently good texture to start with. Introducing pores where there was none can affect the balance of the image. The lack of pores can often indicate that the area is out of focus, thus adding texture can make it look "off" from its surrounding and therefore, will not create an homogeneous result.

When I have an original file with decent skin texture, I usually retouch at the pore level by dodging, burning and cloning until I get an uniform texture. To emphasize them, I usually do some blending of the weak plate.Thats the technique I used for this: http://byloc.com/minifolio/page2/page2.html It is pretty time-consuming technique tho, so Im sure some the pro retouchers here have a more efficient way.
Very good retouch, could you explain it more detailed,.
Reply With Quote top
  #64  
Old 01-12-2006, 01:54 PM
palomino palomino is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 91
agreed--would like to hear more

the retouch posted by meok is excellent, and I too would like to know more about the method used. very subtle.

-Kate
Reply With Quote top
  #65  
Old 01-12-2006, 04:37 PM
meok meok is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Montreal
Posts: 45
Hi Guys,
If I remember correctly, it was technically pretty simple. I started with a global color correction, then used the healing tool to fix up the most obvious skin defect, then added a 50% grey layer on softlight. On it, I used the burn and dodge tool to do some more work on the skin. Then I pushed and pulled some feature of her face (the most discreetly possible). I finished with blending some of the channels to get a little better detail in the skin and hair. Thats pretty much it.
Reply With Quote top
  #66  
Old 01-14-2006, 08:14 AM
Jeronimas Jeronimas is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by meok
Hi Guys,
If I remember correctly, it was technically pretty simple. I started with a global color correction, then used the healing tool to fix up the most obvious skin defect, then added a 50% grey layer on softlight. On it, I used the burn and dodge tool to do some more work on the skin. Then I pushed and pulled some feature of her face (the most discreetly possible). I finished with blending some of the channels to get a little better detail in the skin and hair. Thats pretty much it.
How do you exactly blend channels?
Reply With Quote top
  #67  
Old 01-14-2006, 08:35 AM
meok meok is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Montreal
Posts: 45
Jeronimas,
Blending channel is the process of modify the density of any perticular channel. It is commonly used to emplify low-contrast texture, reajust tonalities, fix certain color casts and is also great for fine-tuning masks. The Photoshop command to blend the channels is "Apply Image" and "calculations", both found in the "image" drop down menu. You can also use the channel mixer, which is a dumb-down version of those tools.

For more info on blending channels, I highly recommend Dan Margulis' "Professsional Photoshop" and "Photoshop LAB color". Also "Photoshop Channel Chops" which is also a great book to learn from. (altho, be ready to pay a pretty penny for it as it is a very rare and prised book.

hope this helps
Reply With Quote top
  #68  
Old 01-14-2006, 01:14 PM
Jeronimas Jeronimas is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 37
This is my try

http://img418.imageshack.us/img418/2...delcopy0gt.jpg
Reply With Quote top
  #69  
Old 01-19-2006, 05:17 PM
buchner buchner is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 9
My try

Hi,
I've been following it for quite a while, and applying what is been discussed here to achieve this look...
My dificulty is the same as many here: get a nice skin texture.
Another one is make the face tone even (forehead has a diferent color tone than cheek, nose, etc...) tones may vary to redish and yellowish.... How can I make it even, chosing a certain color on the face using eyedroper? I mean, lets say I want to color cheeks and nose using forehead color... But I want to alter only the undesired color (I want to keep the colors of shadows, highlights and areas that already look ok), no more, no less... anyone??

Here is my try ( I dont know if texture is visible due file size is limited to 100K).
Thanks

Ricardo
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Dior_skin.jpg (96.0 KB, 332 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #70  
Old 01-19-2006, 09:05 PM
Alehandro Alehandro is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: St. Petersburg Russia
Posts: 4
Another solution

You'll have to do lot's of cloning first, to make skin looks perfect, then
Dan Margulis, and his channel mixing technique
(Loreal retouchers will never share their secrets)
This guy still amazes me, i was in his studio ones
www.akosphotography.com

Here's my result
Attached Images
File Type: jpg beauty.jpg (42.1 KB, 405 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #71  
Old 01-19-2006, 10:13 PM
ray12's Avatar
ray12 ray12 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 284
Ricardo,

Nice Job! Well Done!!

There is a fairly easy way to even out the color without affecting the highlights or shadows too much and still have good control. That way is to paint on a transparent color. Color information only - not the luminance part of the brush.

Heres how: Choose a fairly soft medium size brush. Press the "alt" key and click on the color you want to use from the forehead - this will pick up whatever color is under the brush tip at the time. Go to the brush options bar and change the brush from Normal to Color Mode. This will now paint just with the chroma value of the color. Now paint only where you want the color to go (the cheeks and nose in your case). If you also make the brush 4-10% opacity - it will go on real smooth and will require a couple of strokes to bring it up to full color strength - you get great control and real smooth blending at these 4% to 20% brush opacities. Try painting at 100% opacity and it will look terrible.

If you are really into good control - put this painting on a blank layer above your image and paint on that layer.

Later on you can use the Hue/Saturation /Brightness control to alter its color to almost anything you want. If the edges look a little sharp where you painted - put some gaussian blur on the layer to smooth it out. You can also control the level of the applied color to whatever you like using the layers opacity slider. This lets you see the color at all kinds of various densities.

Below are some examples. Image 1 is your Dior example. Image 2 is the image with the smooth color technique applied. Image 3 is a darkened look that a lot of people seem to like these days. Youre right - the 100k jpeg file limit does reduce the quality of the images some.

Doin' Good!

Ray12
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 4some.jpg (86.3 KB, 280 views)

Last edited by ray12; 01-19-2006 at 10:33 PM.
Reply With Quote top
  #72  
Old 01-20-2006, 05:11 AM
buchner buchner is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 9
Thanks!

Ray:

Thanks for the tips! I will try that later on... Hows your tut going? Will it come to an end soon? We are looking forward it!!

Alehandro:

I think you just nailed it! The reflectance on skin (tiny specular highlights oposed to tiny dots of real skin color) is (for me) the desired effect... Coul you please explain in detail and (if you dont mind) post the original photo, before your retouching??

Thanks both again!!

Ricardo
Reply With Quote top
  #73  
Old 01-20-2006, 08:41 AM
Alehandro Alehandro is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: St. Petersburg Russia
Posts: 4
Try This

Lot's of cloning and then, manipulation with LAB and RGB
First, duplicate original image and create two different documents one LAB other GRAYSCALE In original RGB you take two "strong" channels (for details on skin) it's GREEN and BLUE
copy and paste them into a GRAYSCALE document(where you may delete background layer), creating two layers, then paste
LIGHTNESS channel out of LAB doc. into GRAYSCALE doc. Now you got 3 layers
GREEN, BLUE and LIGHTNESS (leave Lightness untouched at the bottom)
Change opacity of Gr. and Bl, to get the desired skin pores, erase the rest of the face (if necessary) leaving skin only in this Gr. and Bl layers, then flatten image, then paste that grayscale into
original LAB documents LIGHTNESS cannel. It will take some time to practice and may not take care of the problem, everything depends on the original image
As a photographer myself, i shoot both digital and film, and when you use KODAK
EPR 64 film with Mamiya RZ and then drum-scan with Imacon, it's incompatible with snapshots that i take sometimes with my Cannon 20d
Sorry guys, but when we see covers of Vogue, Elle, itd. it wasn't shot with one time use point and shoot camera and model didn't do her own makeup . Sometimes the cost of this kind of shoot goes up to 100 thou
Thank you, everybody, great ideas, i'm not sure about 3d though, i think thats pushing it
Attached Images
File Type: jpg beauty_00.jpg (44.3 KB, 255 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #74  
Old 01-20-2006, 10:53 AM
buchner buchner is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 9
Thanks so much for that, Alehandro!

Im trying with that image you posted (of course is a lower resolution image, and should not get the same results as a bigger file), but the final result brings me a darker image than you ended up with.

Theres a part Im getting trouble:

"Change opacity of Gr. and Bl, to get the desired skin pores, erase the rest of the face (if necessary) leaving skin only in this Gr. and Bl layers, then flatten image, then paste that grayscale into"

I slide both opacities (Green and blue) but it doesnt seem to reveal me more or less pores...

And what should I erase? Eyes, lips hair and foreground?

Anyone else sorted that out?

Thks!

Ricardo
Reply With Quote top
  #75  
Old 01-20-2006, 11:57 AM
Alehandro Alehandro is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: St. Petersburg Russia
Posts: 4
Hey Ricardo, I'm sorry, i made a lil mistake, you have to put Lightness image on top of Bl and Gr. (try to fined out that balance with opacity between Bl and Gr) then when you merge em together it looks a lil darker then "Li", so what you do is, you curve that merged layer a lil, to make it more less look like "Li" layer, but with more details in skin texture, then you just erase those parts of skin on the "Li" layer that you need, then merge and paste the result into original "Li" of your LAB
Reply With Quote top
  #76  
Old 01-20-2006, 01:32 PM
buchner buchner is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 9
Thanks one more time for your attention alehandro!!

Forgive my ignorance, but I am not finding a way to reveal the pores nicely as you did... I can find some extra contrast (showing the pores) but only blending blue n green channels. The very last part, Im not getting it (lightness on top layer, then erasin or masking other parts but skin). Doesnt seem to improve what I already got blending the two channels (G and B) and then ajust it (using curves) to approximatelly match the "lightness" layer tone...
I dont want to take your time, explaining something you already did (my ignorance is not your fault).
Do you know where I can study the subject (is that the Dan Margulis technique?) more deeply? maybe my doubts will be fullfilled...
Im searching under his name (lots of stuff) but coundnt find yet this very same subject (skin - channels - lab mode,etc)

Ricardo
Reply With Quote top
  #77  
Old 01-20-2006, 08:14 PM
makeovermagic's Avatar
makeovermagic makeovermagic is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: NJ
Posts: 179
i thought i'd take a shot at alehandro's picture -- just curious if i'm achieving a good look -- this is a combination of many techniques, and i'm just learning.

MOM
Attached Images
File Type: jpg beautyMOM.jpg (81.2 KB, 347 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #78  
Old 01-21-2006, 10:18 AM
Alehandro Alehandro is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: St. Petersburg Russia
Posts: 4
Hey Ricardo, i wish i could FTP to you that pdf file with Dan Margulis "Professional Photoshop.The Classic Guide To Color Correction", with over 400 pages of useful stuff, but unfortunately it's in russian, i think you can order that book at Amazon or Barns & Nobel. Or here is another solution, go to www.edonkey.com , download their software, install it, then search
for any "Dan Margulis" with "any" format selected, i see they got 3 kinds of pdf's now online, it's about 42-58 mg.
Here's a li sample of what i have in english
Nice job MOM keep up the good work
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Sharpen_01.jpg (99.8 KB, 304 views)
File Type: jpg Sharpen_02.jpg (91.2 KB, 194 views)
File Type: jpg Sharpen_03.jpg (96.3 KB, 149 views)
File Type: jpg Sharpen_04.jpg (91.9 KB, 138 views)
File Type: jpg Sharpen_05.jpg (96.6 KB, 161 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #79  
Old 01-21-2006, 11:35 PM
Craig_H Craig_H is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Western Australia
Posts: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by makeovermagic
i thought i'd take a shot at alehandro's picture -- just curious if i'm achieving a good look -- this is a combination of many techniques, and i'm just learning. MOM
Skin looks nice, but you have smoothed out the lips, eyes and eyebrows. They're no longer sharp. You didn't use a layer mask I'm assuming?
Reply With Quote top
  #80  
Old 01-22-2006, 04:07 PM
makeovermagic's Avatar
makeovermagic makeovermagic is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: NJ
Posts: 179
Craig,

Thanks for the feedback -- I did use a layer mask, but I left the opacity too high.

MOM

P.S. Thanks Alehandro for the nice comment and also for the articles; they are very informative.

Last edited by makeovermagic; 01-24-2006 at 04:37 AM.
Reply With Quote top
  #81  
Old 01-23-2006, 08:44 PM
buchner buchner is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alehandro
Here's a li sample of what i have in english
Nice job MOM keep up the good work
Wow, Alehandro!
Thanks a LOT for the file!!
Excuse me for not answering right away (I was traveling).
I will check that material.
Ricardo
Reply With Quote top
  #82  
Old 02-02-2006, 06:46 PM
a-delusion a-delusion is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1
Here's on i made

Here's on i made
Reply With Quote top
  #83  
Old 03-07-2006, 08:23 AM
eogg eogg is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 9
Hi all,

I've recently been messing around with two different skin technique, described in two excellent tutorial from here : ray12's (essentially, surface blur, color/light enhancement, and I've remained low-level in the important step of restoring some texture back) and Ro's (high-pass with quite a low radius, invert, linear light, blur).

First I did use Ro's. But the edge fringing is tiresome to get rid of, so I tried out ray12's. But the texture disappears very much...
And then, I was very interested by Panpan's post in page 1 of this thread : I realized there was more to the highpass / GB combination than what Ro told us !

--

As a matter of fact, the highpass filter can be used to "filter out" (more or less) whatever size of "imperfection" you wish to.

My initial problem was to get rid of obvious cellulite patterns in a thigh, but I wanted to keep as much natural texture as possible. OK ? And neither technique yielded excellent results...
In fact, both seemed to smooth out the surface of the skin (in fact, the small grain texture - less than 1 mm in size), but didn't really touch what I wanted (its larger texture - cellulite patterns must be something like 1 cm in typical size).

(Also : I understand that these techniques weren't meant to remove cellulite in the first place !)

So I tried several uses of the high pass filter (... and some FFT, too ! But that was too far-fetched it seems), and I came up with this : using byRo's technique with high-radiuses is... awesome !

My workflow to get rid of cellulite patterns is as is :
- duplicate layer
- run high pass. Select the smaller radius that reveals exactly the level of detail you want to "downplay" (or erase !). My tests have given me radiuses around 8 pixels for low-res pics
- desaturate (some color often comes in at these radiuses)
- change blend mode to linear light
- Image > adjustments > invert
- And now's a rather fun part... run a gaussian blur with preview on : there seems to be a very small range of radiuses that will enable the highpass layer to "destroy" the targeted range of imperfections. I've come up with radiuses around 3 to 4 pixels for that, which is consistent with byRo's one third rule.

Then, there is some (lot) of masking out to do, since the edges of the image (of the body, namely) will have an ugly "double fringe".
This masking can be partially automated (duplicate original, highpass, find edges, levels & curves, select dark areas, expand selection, fill with black, blur a little, paste the result into mask) but not entirely.

--

Another possible use of "high-passed" layers is, on the contrary, to have some texture stand out : namely, a high-pass layer with a very low radius (~.5 to 1 pixel for a 3 MP pic) that you *don't* invert before blending as linear light will have very little details stand out... like actual skin pores !

--

My conclusion for today is that high pass filter is incredibly powerful to downplay (or overplay !) elements of texture that have a coherent "typical size" (very little size = skin pores ; rather little size = superficial skin texture ; rather large size = cellulite patterns - for example).
The problem is in the handling of edges... sometimes, the induced fringe is very large. I need to investigate this !

Last edited by eogg; 03-07-2006 at 09:17 AM. Reason: (misc. completion)
Reply With Quote top
  #84  
Old 03-07-2006, 08:32 AM
eogg eogg is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 9
In fact, here are some pics...

0 - Original
http://gcatshare3.free.fr/retouch/skincell_orig.jpg
(see what I'm meaning, by "cellulite patterns" ?)

1 - Surface blur
http://gcatshare3.free.fr/retouch/skincell_surfblur.jpg
(actually, cellulite is pretty much washed out, but isn't it too much)

2 - Surface blur + noise (quickly done, could be more crisp...)
http://gcatshare3.free.fr/retouch/sk...blur_noise.jpg

3 - High pass with a low radius (purely byRo's technique)
http://gcatshare3.free.fr/retouch/skincell_hpass1.jpg
(cellulite is still here...)

And now, what I messed around with :

4 - High pass with a higher radius (edges masked out manually)
http://gcatshare3.free.fr/retouch/skincell_hpass2.jpg
(now, what do you think of that ?)

5 - Step 4 + step 3 added
http://gcatshare3.free.fr/retouch/skincell_hpass2+1.jpg
Reply With Quote top
  #85  
Old 03-20-2006, 05:48 PM
slim_easy slim_easy is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1
Hai, i am joko from indonesia, i have been studying photoshop intense lately, since i garaduated. I like it to be here among pro senior, wish to learn more...

btw, after reading the topic and learning, i have develop my own picture from the attachment above, please give me some advise..
The image only tweak for smothing skin and bring back the pores. I didnt do any application for the skin color ( still learning for enhancing skin tone color ).

Joko,

P.s : sorry my bad english..
Attached Images
File Type: jpg beauty basic.jpg (96.7 KB, 260 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #86  
Old 08-02-2006, 07:10 PM
ranamosleh ranamosleh is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: australia
Posts: 3
Patches remodeling

Hi every one I found this PDF its good..

have a look at it..

http://www.caip.rutgers.edu/~oanacula/cula-ijcv05.pdf#search='cheek%20texture%20patch'
Reply With Quote top
  #87  
Old 08-02-2006, 09:10 PM
byRo's Avatar
byRo byRo is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Goianésia, Brazil
Posts: 1,609
Been reading eogg's posts and thought it's time to post a new version of the deGrunge.
I included a new sharpening layer which gives good and very quick results.
For those who like to see how everything works (if you don't just skip ahead), here's a step by step description .....

- Make a dulicate layer [<Ctl><J>]
- Invert [<Ctl><I>]
- Set Blending to Linear Light, opacity 50% (everthing just went grey now)
- Run Hi-Pass, starting with the lowest radius, increase until the pore texture is just gone but the "grunge" is visible (for me it was 0.8 here)
- Stamp to a new layer [<Ctl><Alt><Shift><E>] (obs. if using PS7 you'll need to do [<Ctl><Alt><Shift><N>] first)
- Duplicate this layer [<Ctl><J>]
- Run a GBlur on this new layer until the grunge is just gone. (I used 7.0) If there is some stubborn grunge, instead of increasing the GBlur radius, make a feathered selection and do a local GBlur (as in the middle of the cheek)
- Add a hide-all mask to this blurred layer [<Alt><New Mask>]
- Select your Hi-Pass layer and push it up to the top (looks wierd)
- Invert the layer[<Ctl><I>] and "Voilá" we're right back at the original
- (Now comes the fun) Select the mask of the blurred layer and paint in where you want to smooth the skin.

OK, up to now that's just the deGrunge, but wait..

- Duplicate [<Ctl><J>] the Hi-Pass layer and crank up the opacity to 100%
- Add a hide-all mask [<Alt><New Mask>] and paint in where you want to sharpen up (hair, eyebrows, eyes, nostril edge, lips)
I have (been nice and) posted an action which does all the setting-up, you only need to decide the Hi-Pass radius for the pores and the GBlur radius for the grunge - besides that, just paint the masks.

The attachment shows the finished layer set-up (I lowered the blurred layer's opacity to 70% to not look too "plasticky") and it is quick (I timed myself - it took a whole 73 seconds!)

Attached Images
File Type: jpg byRo-deGrunge-2.jpg (98.7 KB, 341 views)
Attached Files
File Type: zip byRo deGrunge 'n Details.zip (736 Bytes, 161 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #88  
Old 08-03-2006, 08:50 AM
KR1156 KR1156 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: outside of the box.
Posts: 628
ByRo.....thanks for taking the time to make that action.

Another quick & esasy way to sharpen pore information is…

• Duplicate your bkgd layer

• Run unsharp mask on Red Channel

• Run unsharp mask on yellow channel

• Than set that layer that you duplicated to luminosity.

*you can always mask out any info that you don't want sharpened.

:::last image is a cleaned up versiion:::
Attached Images
File Type: jpg bef.jpg (81.8 KB, 251 views)
File Type: jpg aftt.jpg (96.8 KB, 247 views)
File Type: jpg clean.jpg (97.0 KB, 348 views)

Last edited by KR1156; 08-03-2006 at 10:34 AM.
Reply With Quote top
  #89  
Old 01-28-2007, 03:56 AM
cspringer cspringer is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 135
Re: Orange Peel Skin Texture - How to get

Quote:
Originally Posted by ray12
Thanks for the inputs - very helpful.

byRo - thanks for link - i think it takes us an additional step closer. The idea of doing a displacement map or an emboss on multiple layers of noise is great. The final image was pretty good.

cameraken - these 3d guys have really done their homework lately it seems. I wonder if they have some bump screens that we can use for glamour kinds of things. Could they create 2200x2200pix skin texture screens on a flat plane with their stuff?

Below is an example of one of the images I was working on. A couple. The goal was to enhance the image. Its not done yet - but here are 3 stages of development. Original, pasty, then with just a little skin texture borrowed from a celebrity hi res image i found - cheek texture only. Just FYI.

Keep the ideas coming - theyre really great.

Ray12
find a leather purse, chair, etc. and take a picture. Paste to picture and try different layer modes/opacities or load in texturizer. Add a mask and tweak.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2...r-skinfix2.gif
Reply With Quote top
  #90  
Old 04-29-2008, 01:38 PM
pyromania's Avatar
pyromania pyromania is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 2
Re: Orange Peel Skin Texture - How to get

Hi! I've been reading your comments. Thank you so much for all your advices. I came to here googling "creating real skin". I've been working on making a 3D model from an asian man, but what I found is tiny pictures, oftlenly blurry ....
Reply With Quote top
  #91  
Old 03-31-2012, 04:16 PM
morganwise morganwise is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 1
Re: Pooring On The Pores

Quote:
Originally Posted by Klaatu Baradda View Post
Greetings All,
Here's another approach that is perhaps a bit more direct in creating skin texture (particularly pores) without a lot of hullabaloo.

1) Create a new layer (above your model's face) and Fill it with 50% gray (Edit>Fill>50% Gray)
2) Add Noise (10%-Gaussian-monochromatic)
3) Go to Filter>Stylize>Emboss (135°/2/100)
4) Set the layer blending to Overlay
5) Add a mask to the layer with "Hide All" (i.e., filled with black)
6) Grab a soft brush, low opacity (10%) and set foreground color to white.

Now, paint on the mask where you want the pores to show. Typically, this will be stronger in the darker or shadow areas of a face.

Of course, you can tweak the Noise and Emboss layer to be smaller or larger pores OR you can alway grab a photo of skin, desaturate it, use it as the embossed layer and carry on with the other steps.
Thanks Klaatu! This method worked wonders for me. Thanks to the whole thread as well.
Reply With Quote top
  #92  
Old 04-22-2012, 05:10 PM
zajac4 zajac4 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 7
Re: Orange Peel Skin Texture - How to get

My method:
1) Create a new layer (copy background , CTRL+A / CTRL+C / CTRL+V)
2) New layer - inverse (CTRL+I)
3) New Layer - Image / Adjustments / Brightness-Contrast / Contrast -50% , previev and use legacy ON
4) New layer - penetration of the layers -> Linear Light (the whole image will be gray)
5) New layer - filter / other / High Pass / 4.0 (regain a fuzzy picture)
6) New layer - filter / blur / Gaussian Blur / 2.0
Reply With Quote top
  #93  
Old 04-23-2012, 07:53 AM
julianmarsalis julianmarsalis is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 333
Re: Orange Peel Skin Texture - How to get

Quote:
Originally Posted by zajac4 View Post
My method:
1) Create a new layer (copy background , CTRL+A / CTRL+C / CTRL+V)
2) New layer - inverse (CTRL+I)
3) New Layer - Image / Adjustments / Brightness-Contrast / Contrast -50% , previev and use legacy ON
4) New layer - penetration of the layers -> Linear Light (the whole image will be gray)
5) New layer - filter / other / High Pass / 4.0 (regain a fuzzy picture)
6) New layer - filter / blur / Gaussian Blur / 2.0
So are you really making new layers? or just editing on the new layer created in step 1? 5 & 6 can't be actual new layers a bit confused by the instructions...
Reply With Quote top
  #94  
Old 04-23-2012, 03:43 PM
zajac4 zajac4 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 7
Re: Orange Peel Skin Texture - How to get

I only work on two layers. Let's call them the "background" (L1) and the "new layer" (L2). In the first step I make a copy of the background layer (L2 copy L1). The remaining steps only performs on the new layer (L2).
Reply With Quote top
  #95  
Old 04-23-2012, 03:52 PM
julianmarsalis julianmarsalis is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 333
Re: Orange Peel Skin Texture - How to get

Quote:
Originally Posted by zajac4 View Post
I only work on two layers. Let's call them the "background" (L1) and the "new layer" (L2). In the first step I make a copy of the background layer (L2 copy L1). The remaining steps only performs on the new layer (L2).
That's what I thought thanks for the clarification...
Reply With Quote top
  #96  
Old 06-25-2012, 03:52 AM
photophile photophile is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 18
Re: Orange Peel Skin Texture - How to get

Here is mine:
Waiting for any comments. Thanks!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg aftt Beauty Retouch 2.jpg (93.9 KB, 76 views)
Reply With Quote top
  #97  
Old 07-07-2013, 10:20 PM
dev.sahan01 dev.sahan01 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1
Re: Orange Peel Skin Texture - How to get

My edit

beauty_00.jpgbeauty_00 copy2 copy.jpg
Reply With Quote top
Reply

  RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Retouching


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Glamour retouch challenge here!!!! superkoax Photo Retouching 332 02-08-2011 08:52 PM
Skin Texture saby Critiques 3 07-06-2007 11:14 AM
Skin texture superfrasky Photo Retouching 37 05-26-2007 06:29 PM
Skin texture and tones davepidgeon Photo Retouching 3 05-07-2007 01:22 PM
new skin texture bullys1974 Photo Retouching 2 01-28-2007 03:53 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:31 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright © 2015 Doug Nelson. All Rights Reserved