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Photo Retouching "Improving" photos, post-production, correction, etc.

A great tutorial on Skin

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  #21  
Old 02-28-2006, 11:19 AM
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ray12 ray12 is offline
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pure,

I also do the high pass on the second layer and use softlight mode.

I used to make my texture masks in mono and then level set them to 128 or 50% with the eye dropper measuring tools. Did fine with that - but the high pass seems to place its textured results onto a good netural gray layer automatically - thus eliminating a step.

One thing I do often is take the high pass mask and smart sharpen it really high to 130-180%. It really emphasizes the skin pore details really well - and if its too much - I can use a layer mask to paint the texture on with a low opacity brush - or use the layers opacity slider to tone down the whole effect to just the level I want.

The high pass layer - all by itself- is usually not strong enough most of the time to give me the full strength of the effect im looking for.

Just another twist.

Ray
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  #22  
Old 02-28-2006, 01:28 PM
edgework edgework is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tristefoc
http://ayrusis.multiply.com/photos/album/23

check this out guys, not taken by me, but how do we achieve such shininess? I know we've got the highpass plus clone tools and dodge and burn, but anyone can give an idea how such a shine is given?
You should check out this link: http://www.thelightsrightstudio.com/photoshop-tools.htm

Dozens of highly useful actions, generously offered for all who are interested. These are not just recordings of simple steps; they reveal a solid understanding of Photoshop's deeper, more arcane structures. Their creator posts on this site frequently and the rest of his site is worth a long visit.

In particular, the Diffuse Glows actions will give you a great place to start from. Examine how they're constructed and you'll be a long way towards coming up with your own work flow.

A believable shine has to play off the natural contours of the subject. Try duping and blurring your image, put it in Screen, Soft Light, Overlay or Hard Light mode. Focus the effect on the areas that are already light with a blurred mask taken from one of your channels, probably Green. Use the Blend If... sliders to narrow the focus even more. Tune the intensity of the effect with opacity. Be careful though; it's easy to get carried away. A little glow goes a long way.
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  #23  
Old 03-01-2006, 03:40 PM
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shellby shellby is offline
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The glow

tristefoc:

Looking at those images - especially the arms - I believe that the model has been smeared with oil. This is what photographers use to achieve the shiny look, baby oil mixed with other kinds of oil and hair gel (read this in a recent photography magazine)
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  #24  
Old 03-02-2006, 11:57 AM
john_opitz john_opitz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shellby
tristefoc:

Looking at those images - especially the arms - I believe that the model has been smeared with oil. This is what photographers use to achieve the shiny look, baby oil mixed with other kinds of oil and hair gel (read this in a recent photography magazine)

Hello Shellby,

These home applications are not new to a lot who have been in the industry (models, photographers and art directors). If you have that kind of control when photographing. Do the above before shooting. also, you can take iodine and add to the baby oil. To give it an orange effect. You can also use artificial sun tanning lotions, as well, as a second choice to facial/body make-up. Testing these home applications under photographic tests are recommended, to see how well they record.
What one can also do, is send the model to a spa. For a body waxing (legs, areas of unwanted hair), skin cleansing (deep pore cleaning), manicure, pedicure.. A lot of models have this done before hand, part of the models' fee one pays for. Make-up/Full body make-up, also helps. For times it called for. Hair/Make-up artists are very good in this dept. with the oil base make-ups, for that glow. But expensive. This reduces image-editing time as well as the cost of retouching. You should weigh the cost though. From a production stand point, this is inexpensive, they would not even give the cost a second look.. For a photographer/model (internet model who does not have an agent/agency) who has to pick up the cost by him/her self, it can be expensive. For someone who is not at that production stand point. The oil, oil/iodine, or artificial sun tanning lotion is a second choice with the addition of the spa visit (leg waxing anyway). Better from a photographic stand point, then shaving Unless it not called for. You can always retouch it out, if someone changes their mind
Some of these products one can purchase from specialty make-up distributors. Joe Blasco' (do a Google search) has a specialty line of make-up. Not only for facial, also for body make-up. He's one of the make-up artists for production movies, or was. And not only for those horror movies either. One, I remember was a heavy white titanium (yes, metal) base make-up, this was his brand of make-up. It had to be applied every 15 min. under hot lights. It was that heavy. It just sagged between the body heat and the hot lights. Photographically, it didn't record any pores of the skin. And the skin glowed. The effect reminded me of a ceramic china doll. What I was told from the ole' ti'ma's was this heavy white titanium base make-up was used in b & w work at one time. But, I see it used for color work as well. Make-up artists know how to add different tints to this stuff as well for color work (skin tones). One thing I remember is that, that titanium base make-up. The key to applying it was to go lightly, not heavy. A little went a long way.

John
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  #25  
Old 03-02-2006, 02:17 PM
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i agree.

i think the more professional and expensive the campaigns are (like dior or gucci) the better the models are caressed. i sometimes ask myself why i have to cut the nails and make feet pedicure and manicure. that may be the reason. if they have to pay it on their own, the models wont go to bodycare every week. if i was a model i better go and get there.
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  #26  
Old 03-03-2006, 08:10 PM
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I have two suggestions on my mind I'd like to share:

As I hardly know about any model with severe skin-problems I assume a skin with only minor blemishes to be retouched. Hence, I concentrate on very small areas which need to be flattened.

So the first solution would be to use the spot healing brush on those blemishes. Simple but if set to a very small size I cannot spot a difference to the D&B method.

The second one is to use a second layer, apply gaussian or whatever you like and paint with a very small brush in the mask to only hide the "blemished" area.

The D&B method has a great outcome since it's so detailed and I correct every bit by itself, while all the other method use the sledgehammer "run a steamroller across" technique annihilating every tiny bit of detail.

Patrick
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  #27  
Old 03-03-2006, 09:28 PM
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john_opitz:

john_opitz:

I wasn't implying that the methods where new, only that I read it in a recent photography magazine.

I was answering the question of how these images where done -

Originally Posted by tristefoc
http://ayrusis.multiply.com/photos/album/23

Last edited by shellby; 03-03-2006 at 09:30 PM. Reason: adding to post
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  #28  
Old 03-03-2006, 11:16 PM
Akbar Tahir Akbar Tahir is offline
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Hello everyone

hi everyone
Attached Images
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  #29  
Old 03-04-2006, 04:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PatrickB

So the first solution would be to use the spot healing brush on those blemishes. Simple but if set to a very small size I cannot spot a difference to the D&B method.

The second one is to use a second layer, apply gaussian or whatever you like and paint with a very small brush in the mask to only hide the "blemished" area.
Patrick
thats right, except that i cant deliver a picture which is kind of blurry in any region of skin. the photographers wont accept it, they want to see every pore and detail. so 90% of the working examples here in this forum are looking blurred slightly.
i dont want to offend or dislike your examples, as i also did it like you and i liked it a bit blurred. its only that the client wont accept it. its his opinion.

thats what i am still trying to figure out and cant find a solution, especially when i see billboards of great plain and even skin commercials, where you see every pore and no blur.

currently i am working on skin like:

1. small or medium spots & lines: healing brush, tiny size

3. large blotched areas: d&b or Shellbys 50%grey method sometimes.

2. worst case skin, very blotchy and spotty, whole body:
surface blur & Highpass

i am still looking desperately for faster skin repair methods, as some photographers dont have the budget for relative timeconsumptive work methods like d&b or 50%grey (regarding bikini/fashion/underware commercials or nude people)
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  #30  
Old 03-04-2006, 06:26 AM
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shellby shellby is offline
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Fast and Cheap or Slow and Pricey??

Slow but perfect I might add

This is a hard one. I am also finding that people want the perfect non-blurred skin but are not prepared to pay for the time. These take between 2 and 5 hours, depending on the image. How long does it take you out there? Then there are other things such as make each strand of hair straight and so on and so on...

Do you guys tend to stay clear if people who make unrealistic requests, or do you offer the blur method as a faster option?

Oh and the 50% gray is dodge and burn. Avoid using the actual dodge and burn tools as this is destructive to the pixels. The gray layer and painting in with 5% white or black to dodge or burn is non-destructive.

Last edited by shellby; 03-04-2006 at 06:28 AM. Reason: adding to post
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