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Getting skin tones right?

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  #1  
Old 09-14-2006, 03:37 AM
freddyfries freddyfries is offline
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Wink Getting skin tones right?

Hi there, I was wondering if anyone has any good tips on how to get the skin tone looking a bit better on this image.

I tend to stick in a fairly fierce S-curve in Photoshop to get this style of image (ie highlight fairly blown out and shadows deeper), however the downside is that there is always a yellowish tone to the skin. I have tried to ramp up the blue channel slightly, however that can lead to further problems. Does anyone have a suggestion for a good technique for correcting skintones or know of a good tutorial. It would be most appreciated, thanks alot for your time and attention

Freddy
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  #2  
Old 09-14-2006, 04:13 AM
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Ying Ying is offline
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I tried adjustment -> hue/saturation -> lowering the yellows saturation to -40
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Old 09-14-2006, 05:53 AM
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philbach philbach is offline
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Yellow

I used a selective color adjustment layer to add cyan to the yellows. I also decreased the contrast.
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Old 09-14-2006, 08:26 AM
freddyfries freddyfries is offline
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Thumbs down

I quite liked Yings version, one thing though I am trying to affect just the skin area and not desaturate the image of colour elsewhere (eg the t-shirts) Is there anyway of isolating the skin quickly (quicker than a Quickmask anyway)
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Old 09-14-2006, 08:49 AM
Cassidy Cassidy is offline
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I find making the adjustment to taste and using a mask and painting in and out the detail much more efficient. It's rough, very rough, but just to give the idea
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Last edited by Cassidy; 09-14-2006 at 09:00 AM.
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  #6  
Old 09-14-2006, 10:18 AM
edgework edgework is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by philbach
I used a selective color adjustment layer to add cyan to the yellows. I also decreased the contrast.
You're correct in seeing that the problem is in deficient cyan. However, using selective color to pump missing tone through another plate (in this case, building cyan information that matches the yellow profile) will simply pull your tones towards duotone quality. (Also, since yellow/blue information contains most of the grunge, using that color to add Cyan will make the skin extremely dirty.)

What's needed is to get Photoshop to build a new plate for you. Here's a trick from Dan Margulis:

Dupe the image and convert the duplication to cmyk. All things being equal, the screen representation should look the same for both images. Note, however, the difference in the Cyan plate and the Red plate. In theory, cyan ink reproduces the information in the Red channel (minus shadow detail siphoned off into the black plate), but the dot-gain compensation kills detail, particularly in the 25% - 75% range. Note also that the image we're starting with has hot Hot HOT shadows. So there's not all that much cyan information to move over to the black plate anyway.

Back to the RGB image, go the the Red plate and select All and copy.

Return to the CMYK image, go to the Cyan plate, select all and paste. You've now effectively boosted the Cyan channel with bona fide cyan information rather than tainting the Magenta or yellow plates.

Convert the CMYK image back to RGB and note the difference.

I actually repeated this process a second time, blending the final result into the original at about 80%, then used a slight Selective Color move to pull a little magenta and add yellow in the reds, and pull yellow and add magenta in the yellows to bring the tones more in balance. You can see that the shadows have now lost their heat and the rest of the skin tones are in acceptable ranges.

http://edgework.tripod.com/samples/yellow_fixed.jpg

Last edited by edgework; 09-14-2006 at 10:24 AM.
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  #7  
Old 09-14-2006, 11:06 AM
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byRo byRo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freddyfries
I tend to stick in a fairly fierce S-curve in Photoshop......
Seems that you are working in RGB mode.

RGB is great for your monitor to work on, but causes all sorts of problems when adjusting images.

When you lighten part of the image you are adjusting three channels (R, G, B) at the same time. The actual luminosity (lightness) that you see is a weighted average of these three. Problem is, when you raise them it's easy for one or two of them to max out (Red first, then Green), that's why skin turns yellow.
Full Red, full Green, less Blue is the recipe for a nice yellow tone.

Wouldn't it be nice if there was a way to adjust just the lightness and leave the colours alone?
Well, there is!
Convert to LAB mode (Image>Mode>LAB Color) - L is Luminosity and A and B are the colour information. Now run your S-curve only on the L channel. You change only the Luminosity and leave the colours alone.
When satisfied you can convert back to RGB.

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Old 09-14-2006, 11:52 AM
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Daviskw Daviskw is offline
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Hello byRo

I was just wondering, will making a duplicate and setting its blendmode to luminosity then adjusting with levels or curves in RGB, give close results to lab mode?

Butch
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  #9  
Old 09-14-2006, 12:15 PM
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That works pretty good too, Daviskw.

The results aren't exactly the same, but it's a lot better than adjusting RGB directly.

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  #10  
Old 09-14-2006, 03:39 PM
TheVeed TheVeed is offline
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I'm not 100% sure on what you are looking for, so I just eyeballed it and did what I would have liked.

I just went to color range, and selected her skin color (which matched the child's), then I went into hue/saturation and shifted the hue left a little, and desaturated it.

Then I went to Selective Color, and took out some red from the black.

And lastly I went to Color Balance, put in a little Cyan in midtones, set to Preserve Luminosity.

I just tried a little of everything, basically.
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