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Whats the deal with the 50% gray background?

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  #11  
Old 01-01-2008, 02:09 PM
transoptic transoptic is offline
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Re: Whats the deal with the 50% gray background?

abdul:

Yes, that's about the gist of it. Sometimes you can add a curve adjustment layer to add contrast thereby exaggerating contrast differences and helping show what needs dodged and what needs burned. But it is not necessary, and it is not used in actually dodging or burning.
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  #12  
Old 01-01-2008, 09:19 PM
abdul10000 abdul10000 is offline
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Re: Whats the deal with the 50% gray background?

Quote:
Originally Posted by transoptic View Post
abdul:

Yes, that's about the gist of it. Sometimes you can add a curve adjustment layer to add contrast thereby exaggerating contrast differences and helping show what needs dodged and what needs burned. But it is not necessary, and it is not used in actually dodging or burning.
Yup, use a desaturate or contrast layers for example to better see problems, but no curves used for the actual dodging and burning. Cool thanks for answering my question!
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  #13  
Old 01-02-2008, 06:02 AM
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Markzebra Markzebra is offline
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Re: Whats the deal with the 50% gray background?

"he uses the brush to paint on the gray mask either black (to darken) or white (to lighten). " - you can sample COLORS from within the image, one way is to use HSB sliders to then lighten or darken them before bushing them in. I seem to remember from Chris post that he mentions this too, it does have the advantage of giving you localized control over color. Black and white may desaturate too much you will find on some images. The main advantage with this over the dual curves, or as many curves as you need, is mainly that its all on the one layer. Still prefer Curves though its Ok if you organize them.
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  #14  
Old 01-02-2008, 07:07 AM
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Dave.Cox Dave.Cox is offline
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Re: Whats the deal with the 50% gray background?

One thing about working in photoshop is, there is more than one way to accomplish just about everything. Which one should you use? Well, that depends on your preference, and skill level with that method, and on the image that you are working with. I like to stay away from methods that are destructive to the image, and use methods that can be added via layers. That being said, I find that in some instances I use very methods that I genereally recommend against. I also will also expermient with 2 or 3 methods sometimes, and then use the one that procduces the best results. So again, which one to should you use? Use the method that works best for you, and produces the results that you are looking for. Just remember to keep an open mind.
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  #15  
Old 01-02-2008, 11:20 AM
abdul10000 abdul10000 is offline
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Re: Whats the deal with the 50% gray background?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Markzebra View Post
"he uses the brush to paint on the gray mask either black (to darken) or white (to lighten). " - you can sample COLORS from within the image, one way is to use HSB sliders to then lighten or darken them before bushing them in. I seem to remember from Chris post that he mentions this too, it does have the advantage of giving you localized control over color. Black and white may desaturate too much you will find on some images. The main advantage with this over the dual curves, or as many curves as you need, is mainly that its all on the one layer. Still prefer Curves though its Ok if you organize them.
What are the HSB sliders (Hue, Saturation, and Brightness)? Yes I have encountered this problem and would be interested in trying that solution.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave.Cox View Post
One thing about working in photoshop is, there is more than one way to accomplish just about everything. Which one should you use? Well, that depends on your preference, and skill level with that method, and on the image that you are working with. I like to stay away from methods that are destructive to the image, and use methods that can be added via layers. That being said, I find that in some instances I use very methods that I genereally recommend against. I also will also expermient with 2 or 3 methods sometimes, and then use the one that procduces the best results. So again, which one to should you use? Use the method that works best for you, and produces the results that you are looking for. Just remember to keep an open mind.
Yup, that's why I am trying to learn the gray background (softlight) D&B method, to try a different way.



Many thanks
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  #16  
Old 01-02-2008, 12:17 PM
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cricket1961 cricket1961 is offline
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Re: Whats the deal with the 50% gray background?

Abdul

Yes, I do all of my brushwork on one softlight gray layer. There is nothing wrong with using two different gray layers to lighten and darken. I find that it slows me down though.
I rarely use default black as an option for darkening. I tend to sample a darker flesh tone from the image and use that instead. I will then turn the brightness down on that color to make it as near to black as possible while still retaining the color info. This eliminates any desaturating that may occur.

Chris
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  #17  
Old 01-02-2008, 12:42 PM
abdul10000 abdul10000 is offline
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Re: Whats the deal with the 50% gray background?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cricket1961 View Post
Abdul

Yes, I do all of my brushwork on one softlight gray layer. There is nothing wrong with using two different gray layers to lighten and darken. I find that it slows me down though.
I rarely use default black as an option for darkening. I tend to sample a darker flesh tone from the image and use that instead. I will then turn the brightness down on that color to make it as near to black as possible while still retaining the color info. This eliminates any desaturating that may occur.

Chris

Hey Chris,


Many thanks for answering my question! You pretty much answered the last major question I had about this technique. Now, I am in the process of using this technique instead of the traditional curves D&B method and I am going to beat this technique to death to see what is the most that I can get out of it. Once this is done I am going to summarize my experience. Hopefully this will provide a useful thread for people who are also trying to learn the softlight (gray background) D&B method.


Thanks
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  #18  
Old 01-03-2008, 02:50 AM
drouber drouber is offline
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Re: Whats the deal with the 50% gray background?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cricket1961 View Post
Abdul

... I will then turn the brightness down on that color to make it as near to black as possible while still retaining the color info. This eliminates any desaturating that may occur ...

Chris
Thank you for this remark but how do you turn down this brightness? Maybe by selecting a color range on the softlight gray layer and then turning down the brightness? Isn't this a difficult (selection) task if, after a lot of retouches, you decide a certain color or area needs further darkening? Maybe there is a simple solution. TIA for your comments.
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  #19  
Old 01-03-2008, 05:29 AM
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cricket1961 cricket1961 is offline
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Re: Whats the deal with the 50% gray background?

I select the color I am going to use, click on the foreground color square to bring up the color picker and slide the triangles down on the gradient bar. Or reduce the numbers in the "B" field.

Then I start painting.

Chris
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  #20  
Old 01-03-2008, 07:35 AM
drouber drouber is offline
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Re: Whats the deal with the 50% gray background?

@cricket1961:
Thanks for answering but I was thinking of reducing brightness after painting. Painting again (or painting with white to increase the brightness) is the most obvious way of course. I thought I was missing something here or that there exists some trick to influence the brightness of an already painted area/colour.
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