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gradients

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  #1  
Old 06-11-2008, 06:26 AM
vickatter vickatter is offline
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gradients

Hi,

I have a problem with gradients in photoshop. Its like they have lines instead of the supposedly smooth color fading. Im attaching an example cause its hard to explain(hope you can see them, it looks very small). Ive noticed that it happens with certain color convinations but it doesnt really matter if its linear or radial. Illustrator does it too.
My boss told me she heard that we should try doing them with transparent layers and then merge them... is that so?
Thanks!!!
(Im using CS3)
Attached Images
File Type: jpg XL.jpg (87.6 KB, 46 views)
File Type: jpg gradient sample.jpg (86.0 KB, 41 views)

Last edited by vickatter; 06-11-2008 at 06:43 AM.
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  #2  
Old 06-11-2008, 06:52 AM
edgework edgework is offline
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Re: gradients

Quote:
Originally Posted by vickatter View Post
Hi,

I have a problem with gradients in photoshop. Its like they have lines instead of the supposedly smooth color fading. Im attaching an example cause its hard to explain(hope you can see them, it looks very small). Ive noticed that it happens with certain color convinations but it doesnt really matter if its linear or radial. Illustrator does it too.
My boss told me she heard that we should try doing them with transparent layers and then merge them... is that so?
Thanks!!!
(Im using CS3)
It's called banding. In an 8-bit file, each channel will have a maximum of 256 steps from 0 to 100%. This means there will be a fixed number of steps between any two colors, and if there aren't enough steps available, you will notice the increments. 16-bit files contain around 65,500 steps per channel from 0 to 100%, but for most output applications, the file will be converted to 8-bit anyway, though it's claimed by some that building your gradients in 16-bit, then converting back to 8-bit results in smoother blends. I've never noticed any benefit, but I haven't looked that hard. Most folks try some variation of this: add a new layer above your gradient, in Overlay mode, filled with 50% grey. Then add noise to this layer and play around with the various settings. I personally like to add a much higher value of noise than is needed, then put a .4 pixel blur on it and drop the opacity down to between 15% and 30%. This helps break up the obvious hard edge between steps.
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Old 06-11-2008, 06:55 AM
SilvaFox SilvaFox is offline
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Re: gradients

You can try setting your gradient opacity at 35% and then "draw" gradients at slightly different angles. Build the vignettes up gradually, rather than doing it in one shot at 100% opacity.

Adding a couple pixels of noise into the colors you're blending and setting that layer to multiply helps too. You can use a layer mask to brush the noise out of unwanted areas.

Good luck,

bp
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  #4  
Old 06-11-2008, 07:03 AM
vickatter vickatter is offline
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Re: gradients

Thanks for the quick reply!! Ill try it and get back to you if needed.
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  #5  
Old 06-12-2008, 03:40 AM
JavierT JavierT is offline
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Re: gradients

Quote:
Originally Posted by edgework View Post
It's called banding. In an 8-bit file, each channel will have a maximum of 256 steps from 0 to 100%. This means there will be a fixed number of steps between any two colors, and if there aren't enough steps available, you will notice the increments. 16-bit files contain around 65,500 steps per channel from 0 to 100%, but for most output applications, the file will be converted to 8-bit anyway, though it's claimed by some that building your gradients in 16-bit, then converting back to 8-bit results in smoother blends. I've never noticed any benefit, but I haven't looked that hard. Most folks try some variation of this: add a new layer above your gradient, in Overlay mode, filled with 50% grey. Then add noise to this layer and play around with the various settings. I personally like to add a much higher value of noise than is needed, then put a .4 pixel blur on it and drop the opacity down to between 15% and 30%. This helps break up the obvious hard edge between steps.
I agree completely Edgework recipe. It works for me.

Work in 16 bit images always you can.
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