RetouchPRO

Go Back   RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Retouching
Register Blogs FAQ Site Nav Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Photo Retouching "Improving" photos, post-production, correction, etc.

Boosting Black Boosting Whites

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 07-13-2009, 03:55 AM
_ManWithNoName_ _ManWithNoName_ is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: http://www.weddingphotographers.ws
Posts: 123
Boosting Black Boosting Whites

This is kind related to my other Thread.

How do you boost the blacks / the whites to give that high contrast example below.

http://ebrusidar.net/gallery/view.php?lang=en&image=516

I'm getting better and Im using Lum masks to isolate the Light, Light Lights e.t.c and performing a curves or levels or contrast adjust. Still not getting the results Im after or Im afraid to push it too much.

Any more advice on this is welcome...

Cheers...
Reply With Quote top
  #2  
Old 07-13-2009, 08:57 AM
snook305's Avatar
snook305 snook305 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: South
Posts: 426
Re: Boosting Black Boosting Whites

Hey looks great.. maybe a tad too dark in the edges but very nice. you'll have to see how those darks print up..
Good job
Snook
Reply With Quote top
  #3  
Old 07-13-2009, 09:34 AM
_ManWithNoName_ _ManWithNoName_ is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: http://www.weddingphotographers.ws
Posts: 123
Re: Boosting Black Boosting Whites

Sorry.

I knew I should have clarified. This isn't mine, but as you can see the blacks are black and the whites white...
Reply With Quote top
  #4  
Old 07-14-2009, 05:40 PM
mando-matic mando-matic is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Denver, Colorado
Posts: 10
Re: Boosting Black Boosting Whites

I think an aggressive S curve would do it in a Curves Adjustment layer.
Reply With Quote top
  #5  
Old 07-14-2009, 05:44 PM
SEP Studios's Avatar
SEP Studios SEP Studios is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Posts: 25
Re: Boosting Black Boosting Whites

I'm guessing high contrast film is involved. The range of tones, even in the "white" images, is amazing.

It would be helpful to see the original you're working from.

Scott
Reply With Quote top
  #6  
Old 08-14-2009, 02:26 AM
_ManWithNoName_ _ManWithNoName_ is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: http://www.weddingphotographers.ws
Posts: 123
Re: Boosting Black Boosting Whites

Again. Still struggling with this.

This is the type of thing again Im talking about http://josefhoflehner.com/

What Im playing with is Luminance Masks Of Lights and Darks, Curves e.t.c
Wondering if I could also combine (just thought of) Overexposed, Underexposed and Normal image and blend highlights and shadows from each??

Any more for anymore

D
Reply With Quote top
  #7  
Old 08-14-2009, 12:36 PM
seattle-light's Avatar
seattle-light seattle-light is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Vancouver, BC (formerly Seattle and New York)
Posts: 133
Re: Boosting Black Boosting Whites

Man, this shouldn't be so complicated. Start with well exposed image (no blasted whites or filled in blacks) that's got a wide tonal range and that's been captured in Camera Raw (so that you've got the bit depth needed to move the information around without creating a lot of banding). Bring it into Photoshop and make sure you're working in 16-bits per channel (as you will need the extra tonal information to make this work successfully). After bringing it into Photoshop, use a black and white Gradient Map adjustment layer to convert it to black and white (you may then need to do some additional layer adjustments under that gradient to tweak the pre-conversion to address dullness, color pollutants, etc. as you would with any black-and-white conversion). Then use a Curves adjustment layer and move bright areas up and the dark areas down -- you're sacrificing midtones for highs and lows (and this is where the Camera Raw and 16-bit become essential, because when you push the tonal information to those extremes those remaining midtones get pulled apart and will look terrible -- coarse, chunky, banding -- if there's not enough information there to work with). Then you can add adjustment layers to gently tone the image. This will give you a small stack of simple adjustment layers that will get you most of the way there. Now you can do retouching on a layer over the original image and make other adjustments as needed just as you would with any regular color image (always do cleanup before adjustments in the layer stack). I would put a soft light layer over the Gradient Map layer and do D&B there (because your B&W D&B is going to be different than what you'd do in a color image, and it's simpler because you're just using black and white and low opacity brushes) to selectively adjust drama prior to the extreme contrast Curve (easier to do the D&B before the extreme contrast in the layer stack). Let me know how it works out.
Reply With Quote top
  #8  
Old 08-14-2009, 02:21 PM
artist1961 artist1961 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 8
Re: Boosting Black Boosting Whites

the simplest way is to do it on Photoshop , make sure your forground and background color are Black and white go to IMAGE> AJUSTMENT>gradient map... and your image will turn black and white now click on the gradient and adjust the amount of black and white you need

if you have any pic i can give you the example

feel free to as any Q if u have


is this what u want

http://i28.tinypic.com/r09yyt.jpghttp://i28.tinypic.com/r09yyt.jpg

Last edited by artist1961; 08-14-2009 at 02:46 PM. Reason: added pic
Reply With Quote top
  #9  
Old 08-14-2009, 07:39 PM
seattle-light's Avatar
seattle-light seattle-light is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Vancouver, BC (formerly Seattle and New York)
Posts: 133
Re: Boosting Black Boosting Whites

I suppose that's a pretty cool way of getting it "all done" in one adjustment layer. I'll have to try it out on some images (I can some situations where it could be really useful). And it will actually work in those instances where images are already ideally suited for the conversion. But in the real world most images need a bit (or a lot) of finessing.

If you look at Ansel Adams prints, you might think they were just amazing captures (great composition, right place, right time, right exposure -- lucky shots). But if you you thought that you'd be wrong. They weren't just lucky shots of great locations.

The fact is he spent a lot more time in the darkroom perfecting his images than out in the field shooting (he was a master of the art of photographic printing. And the magic was in taking a solid capture and obsessively fine tuning it through dodging and burning (and a host of other techniques to reveal what he saw when he was shooting). If you look at some of his raw negatives or early work prints made from them, his master works are basically unrecognizable -- his true genius was in the coaxing out of the negative what already he had already seen in his mind's eye.

If you turn the conversion into a simple, one-step process, you don't allow yourself the room for exploring the real potential of an image which is going to come out through a lot of subtle adjustments. Sometimes you'll get lucky, and it will work beautifully. But there are going to be lots of time when you won't get lucky, and then the approach simply doesn't give you the tools you need for that situation.

The one-step solution is also it's weakness. First of all, the Gradient Map is not the most intuitive interface for fine tuning adjustments and building your extreme high contrast into the same adjustment layer as the black and white conversion doesn't give you any flexibility through opacity in toning down your adjustment because when you lower it's opacity then you're also diminishing the black and white conversion.

And it doesn't allow you to selectively dodge and burn the "raw" black and white file before applying the high contrast to it. It seems to me that the real fine tuning that is going to make these image sing is going to be taking place after the black and white conversion adjustment but before it's hit with the extreme contrast Curve adjustment. And most of the work that is actually going to make the image sing is going to be done in between those two adjustment layers while they're also both on so that you can visualize what you're doing in real time.

Trying to fix the underlying subtleties after making an extreme adjustment just isn't going to work.

Sometimes putting everything together in one layer adjustment doesn't simplify things. It just ties your hands and makes it harder for you to do what needs to be done.

In my mind, I see these files layering out like this:

(top of layer stack)
--any color balance or tonal adjustments to create the color mood of the black and white (after you get everything else perfected, and probably very subtle)
--Curve to add the contrast
--selective adjustments and dodge and burn to bring out the drama of the image (this are a lot easier on the now "raw" black and white image, and it's much easier to make these changes before the extreme contrast is added into the mix than to try to fix problems afterward)
--Gradient Map to black and white (linear with no adjustments)
--adjustments to color to optimize the black and white conversion (usually made after the gradient so you can see how the changes affect the image)
--cleanup and retouching of the color image (often more than one layer)
--original
(bottom of layer stack)
Reply With Quote top
  #10  
Old 08-14-2009, 11:57 PM
Quantum3 Quantum3 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 911
Re: Boosting Black Boosting Whites

I never thought using a gradient map would change a color picture into black and white. Amazing! But I'm wondering why the image look in colors when adding the gradient with an adjustment layer. I tryed all the pertinent blending modes and the background layer still shows its colors instead, by using the command Image/adjustments/Gradient map the image turns into black and white instantly.

Any solution for that?

Thanks guys!

Mart
Reply With Quote top
Reply

  RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Retouching


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tutorial 05: Converting a Color Image to Black and White grayscale BW DannyRaphael Photo-Art 101 17 05-22-2011 05:55 PM
Gimp black and white conversions edgon Image Help 5 06-26-2009 04:44 PM
Black and White photo adjustments neeper Photo Retouching 2 01-11-2009 08:40 AM
Why can't get black on mask? kevs Photo Compositing 5 09-09-2008 05:52 PM
Realistic black background - how dark? canoflan Photo Retouching 4 08-07-2008 10:59 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:46 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright © 2016 Doug Nelson. All Rights Reserved