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High Resolution pls help

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  #1  
Old 08-15-2009, 09:17 AM
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sergio2263 sergio2263 is offline
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High Resolution pls help

Hi Guys,
The photographer wants a High Resolution of the photo below please see his quote to me in bracket. I haven't a clue what he means as I don't know what is high resolution I feel so so stupid but all I use with my photoshop is my tool, clone, patch tools etc either to colourize or to restore.
(wondered if you could send me one of your colourisations of
my work in a high resolution, colour corrected format. )


http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2432/...baac457b_o.jpg.


Can someone please help me what I am suppose to do with this photo. He has a Canon Pro 9500 printer I think he wants to correct it so he can get a very good photo off my colourized photo. Any help would be much appreciated.


Many thanks in advance.

Marie
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  #2  
Old 08-15-2009, 10:32 AM
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TommyO TommyO is offline
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Re: High Resolution pls help

Marie,
Sometimes, you just have to ask. It can spark some good conversation. Just say that you wanted to be sure what type printer he was going to print on, how high resolution he prefers to print at, and whether or not he prefers to work in RGB or CMYK.

He may not really know, in which case you can offer to send him a few different versions and he can experiment from there. Or, he may have a preference, in which don't disagree with anything... just send him what he wants.

In general, the printer really is not going to perform much better with images above about 300-400 dpi. You may read the spec on the printer and see it can print up to 1400 dpi. That's great, but that resolution is well beyond what our eyes perceive, especially when standing back from a print. The higher res of the printer does help make gradients less banded though.

However, you may find that the customer really has some feeling about the whole issue. If he wants a 1200 dpi image, send it on. It's not worth arguing over.

If the subject of RGB vs CMYK comes up, don't worry either. All consumer level printers today work just fine with RGB images, even if they use CMYK inks. They do all the conversion on the fly. But, if the customer insists on a CMYK image, again.... convert it and send it on.

I generally make a CD with several folders in it. I only provide the customer with one subfolder off my harddrive. It goes something like this:
>5_Deliverables
>5.1_Original_Images
>5.2_Final_Images
>5.2.1_Hi_Resolution_Tiff
>5.2.2_Hi_Resolution_Jpeg

The other folders (not shown) are mine and not delivered to the customer. The "high resolution" images are generally the same resolution that they delivered to me, unless I had to scan something for restoration. They tend to be no more than 300 dpi for modern photographs, and 600 dpi for scans. But, if they request something higher, I'll provide it.

The other thought is to have a look at the original image dimensions versus the maximum printed dimension. The Canon printer above can print at 13x19. If the original was a 4x6, then you need to do some math. Look at the long dimensions.... 19 versus 6. If the 6 inch side was at 300 dpi originally, when it's printed at 19 inches, it will be stretched out and only comprise 95 dpi. (6 inches x 300 dots per inch= 1800 dots; 1800 dots / 19 inches = 94.7 dots per inch)

So, it certainly falls below recommended levels if not converted by you before giving to your customer. You would then need to use Photoshops' "Image > Image Size" to do a conversion. Turn on "constrain", turn on "resample", enter your final image dimensions (13 x 19) and minimum resolution (300). Use "bicubic smoother" for most enlargements. Save this as a new file name; usually embedding the size in the name, i.e. "picture_300dpi_13x19.jpg".

For most of your customers this should suffice. Hope this helps some. Good luck with it. Your picture looks very good !
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  #3  
Old 08-15-2009, 11:14 AM
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mistermonday mistermonday is offline
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Re: High Resolution pls help

Marie, if you measure the colorized part of the image, it is only approx 1000 x 700 pixles in dimension. Print quality is usually considered to be around 300 pixels per inch and so your image as it is currently sized should be printed at 3.4 x 2.3 inches. The person who is wanting to print the image likely wants a larger print than 3.4 x 2.3 so he is asking you for an image of higher resolution (larger size, greater number of pixels).
Regards, Murray
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Old 08-15-2009, 01:04 PM
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0lBaldy 0lBaldy is offline
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Re: High Resolution pls help

Just a quick note about Flickr...

If they or you use Flickr with a free account, you can upload photos up to 10MB in size. BUT They're compressed and resized by Flickr (if necessary).. The Largest size available will only be 1024 pixels if it exceeds that length

If you have a pro account they store your high-resolution originals (up to 20MB), which you (and your friends with Pro accounts) can download.
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Old 08-15-2009, 02:11 PM
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sergio2263 sergio2263 is offline
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Re: High Resolution pls help

Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyO View Post
Marie,
Sometimes, you just have to ask. It can spark some good conversation. Just say that you wanted to be sure what type printer he was going to print on, how high resolution he prefers to print at, and whether or not he prefers to work in RGB or CMYK.

He may not really know, in which case you can offer to send him a few different versions and he can experiment from there. Or, he may have a preference, in which don't disagree with anything... just send him what he wants.

In general, the printer really is not going to perform much better with images above about 300-400 dpi. You may read the spec on the printer and see it can print up to 1400 dpi. That's great, but that resolution is well beyond what our eyes perceive, especially when standing back from a print. The higher res of the printer does help make gradients less banded though.

However, you may find that the customer really has some feeling about the whole issue. If he wants a 1200 dpi image, send it on. It's not worth arguing over.

If the subject of RGB vs CMYK comes up, don't worry either. All consumer level printers today work just fine with RGB images, even if they use CMYK inks. They do all the conversion on the fly. But, if the customer insists on a CMYK image, again.... convert it and send it on.

I generally make a CD with several folders in it. I only provide the customer with one subfolder off my harddrive. It goes something like this:
>5_Deliverables
>5.1_Original_Images
>5.2_Final_Images
>5.2.1_Hi_Resolution_Tiff
>5.2.2_Hi_Resolution_Jpeg

The other folders (not shown) are mine and not delivered to the customer. The "high resolution" images are generally the same resolution that they delivered to me, unless I had to scan something for restoration. They tend to be no more than 300 dpi for modern photographs, and 600 dpi for scans. But, if they request something higher, I'll provide it.

The other thought is to have a look at the original image dimensions versus the maximum printed dimension. The Canon printer above can print at 13x19. If the original was a 4x6, then you need to do some math. Look at the long dimensions.... 19 versus 6. If the 6 inch side was at 300 dpi originally, when it's printed at 19 inches, it will be stretched out and only comprise 95 dpi. (6 inches x 300 dots per inch= 1800 dots; 1800 dots / 19 inches = 94.7 dots per inch)

So, it certainly falls below recommended levels if not converted by you before giving to your customer. You would then need to use Photoshops' "Image > Image Size" to do a conversion. Turn on "constrain", turn on "resample", enter your final image dimensions (13 x 19) and minimum resolution (300). Use "bicubic smoother" for most enlargements. Save this as a new file name; usually embedding the size in the name, i.e. "picture_300dpi_13x19.jpg".

For most of your customers this should suffice. Hope this helps some. Good luck with it. Your picture looks very good !

Hi Tommy,

Thank you so much for your reply and for your nice comment on my work it is much appreciated. I think the clients wants a good high resolution to set his printer, the printer as mentioned is a Canon Pro 9500 he just bought and it need setting to prints colour images I've made the image larger from 72 dpi to 300 dpi but it appears blurry I probably will have to tell him to send me an original 300dpi file in black and white and colourize the photo again that’s the only solution, I have also convert the image from RGB to CMYK the 72dpi one it seems ok.

I see from one of your note you said if the client requests a larger size you provide it would you mind telling me how you do that to get a larger size image?

I am useless when it comes to anything else apart from colourizing and the odd restore or retouches I have not ventured that far with Photoshop.


Many thanks again for your reply the information are valuable.


Marie
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Old 08-15-2009, 02:19 PM
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sergio2263 sergio2263 is offline
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Re: High Resolution pls help

Quote:
Originally Posted by mistermonday View Post
Marie, if you measure the colorized part of the image, it is only approx 1000 x 700 pixles in dimension. Print quality is usually considered to be around 300 pixels per inch and so your image as it is currently sized should be printed at 3.4 x 2.3 inches. The person who is wanting to print the image likely wants a larger print than 3.4 x 2.3 so he is asking you for an image of higher resolution (larger size, greater number of pixels).
Regards, Murray
Hi Murray,

Thanks for your reply it is much appreciated, I found out about high resolution I think the photographer is wanting to set his new printer and enable him to print one of the photo I colourized for him, I think from now on I make sure he send me an image size 300dpi or 600dpi if possible. I've tried to resize the image but at 72dpi it comes out too blurry not nice at all.

Many thanks for your reply


marie
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  #7  
Old 08-15-2009, 02:22 PM
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sergio2263 sergio2263 is offline
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Re: High Resolution pls help

Quote:
Originally Posted by 0lBaldy View Post
Just a quick note about Flickr...

If they or you use Flickr with a free account, you can upload photos up to 10MB in size. BUT They're compressed and resized by Flickr (if necessary).. The Largest size available will only be 1024 pixels if it exceeds that length

If you have a pro account they store your high-resolution originals (up to 20MB), which you (and your friends with Pro accounts) can download.
Yes the Photographer and myself have a Pro flickr account, I think I should mention to him to post his image a large size 300dpi thus making it easire to work with and he can have his large colourized prints.

Many thanks for your reply.


Marie
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  #8  
Old 08-15-2009, 07:00 PM
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TommyO TommyO is offline
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Re: High Resolution pls help

Quote:
Originally Posted by sergio2263 View Post
I see from one of your note you said if the client requests a larger size you provide it would you mind telling me how you do that to get a larger size image?
Marie,
I thought I did .... I'll copy and paste that part. Read it again and see if it makes sense. If not, I will rewrite it and try again.

The other thought is to have a look at the original image dimensions versus the maximum printed dimension. The Canon printer above can print at 13x19. If the original was a 4x6, then you need to do some math. Look at the long dimensions.... 19 versus 6. If the 6 inch side was at 300 dpi originally, when it's printed at 19 inches, it will be stretched out and only comprise 95 dpi. (6 inches x 300 dots per inch= 1800 dots; 1800 dots / 19 inches = 94.7 dots per inch)

So, it certainly falls below recommended levels if not converted by you before giving to your customer. You would then need to use Photoshops' "Image > Image Size" to do a conversion. Turn on "constrain", turn on "resample", enter your final image dimensions (13 x 19) and minimum resolution (300). Use "bicubic smoother" for most enlargements. Save this as a new file name; usually embedding the size in the name, i.e. "picture_300dpi_13x19.jpg".
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Old 08-16-2009, 01:07 AM
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sergio2263 sergio2263 is offline
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Thumbs up Re: High Resolution pls help

Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyO View Post
Marie,
I thought I did .... I'll copy and paste that part. Read it again and see if it makes sense. If not, I will rewrite it and try again.

The other thought is to have a look at the original image dimensions versus the maximum printed dimension. The Canon printer above can print at 13x19. If the original was a 4x6, then you need to do some math. Look at the long dimensions.... 19 versus 6. If the 6 inch side was at 300 dpi originally, when it's printed at 19 inches, it will be stretched out and only comprise 95 dpi. (6 inches x 300 dots per inch= 1800 dots; 1800 dots / 19 inches = 94.7 dots per inch)

So, it certainly falls below recommended levels if not converted by you before giving to your customer. You would then need to use Photoshops' "Image > Image Size" to do a conversion. Turn on "constrain", turn on "resample", enter your final image dimensions (13 x 19) and minimum resolution (300). Use "bicubic smoother" for most enlargements. Save this as a new file name; usually embedding the size in the name, i.e. "picture_300dpi_13x19.jpg".
Thank you so much for explaining further it is much appreciated, I've had a go at re-sizing the image following your instruction but the image appear blurry so I've requested a larger version of the original black and white which would make life easier though I will have to re-colourize again, I need to start understanding about resolutioin size and prints, normally I been getting very large size images to work on but couple of times I've received images at 72dpi and larger prints has been requested.

Back to the drawing board lol

Many thanks TommyO for your well explained thread.


Marie
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  #10  
Old 08-16-2009, 04:08 AM
Quantum3 Quantum3 is offline
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Re: High Resolution pls help

Wait a minute... Your client wants this image at high-res!¿ It's impossible... Just 3,4 x 2,3 inches at 300 dpi. Larger sizes will create the blurry image you got because something called interpolation. If you open the image size dialog box inside PS you will see numbers and stuff. at the very down of the dialog box you will see a box entitled "Resample". That means that interpolation will ocurr when changing the dimentions to the image. Uncheck that box and write 300 where it says 72 and you will get the dimentions on paper at 300 dpi. The photo will look the same on the screen, but that's another thing.
This image is not possible to be printed larger. You can enlarge it by using Genuine Fractals (it uses superb interpolation algoritms), so you don't waste your job
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