RetouchPRO

Go Back   RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Retouching
Register Blogs FAQ Site Nav Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Photo Retouching "Improving" photos, post-production, correction, etc.

the beginning (color profile)

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 03-05-2010, 02:54 AM
ezprod ezprod is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Hollywood, CA
Posts: 55
Re: the beginning (color profile)

WATCH this video. An amazing explanation of channels and using calculations and apply image to create an easy perfect amazing mask!

http://www.deke.com/content/channels...ions-photoshop
Reply With Quote top
  #12  
Old 03-05-2010, 05:12 AM
ApWizard's Avatar
ApWizard ApWizard is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Italy
Posts: 81
Re: the beginning (color profile)

Quote:
Originally Posted by flexmanta View Post
Also, for fashion and beauty, and more or less any photo that contains skin, the best RAW converter is Capture One BY FAR. It's oranges and yellows are the best I have seen and I have tried profiling in Camera Raw to obtain the same results with no success. Not only is it superior regarding color, but it also has several tools dedicated to skin color, and since I've gotten used to merge different conversions into one layer before starting the retouch, with capture one i spend some time just to get the skin right. For example, it has a skin color uniformity tool. Say you have a photo in which the body is more magenta than the face (very common), you can use this tool to bring the hues closer together.

Godmother recommended Capture One to me some time ago and i haven't switched back to ACR for anything with skin. She said Camera Raw has better greens and blues but i haven't tried yet.
I've to quote that, CaptureOne is the best for skin tones.
The first time I've tried I was like O_o, shocked, the difference is quite impressive.

@flexmanta: can you tell me something more about your workflow? Do you merge multiple conversions from CaptureOne, CameraRaw or both? Thank you in advance.
Reply With Quote top
  #13  
Old 03-05-2010, 05:26 AM
Freya Freya is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 18
Re: the beginning (color profile)

Quote:
Originally Posted by flexmanta View Post
Also, for fashion and beauty, and more or less any photo that contains skin, the best RAW converter is Capture One BY FAR. It's oranges and yellows are the best I have seen and I have tried profiling in Camera Raw to obtain the same results with no success. Not only is it superior regarding color, but it also has several tools dedicated to skin color, and since I've gotten used to merge different conversions into one layer before starting the retouch, with capture one i spend some time just to get the skin right. For example, it has a skin color uniformity tool. Say you have a photo in which the body is more magenta than the face (very common), you can use this tool to bring the hues closer together.

Godmother recommended Capture One to me some time ago and i haven't switched back to ACR for anything with skin. She said Camera Raw has better greens and blues but i haven't tried yet.
I was also advised by Godmother to use Capture One, and after watching her demonstrate the difference working with skintones between C1 and ACR yesterday, I was totally sold. I downloaded a demo today and have been playing around with the basic settings and it really is amazing.... Although Im not sure how the specific skin color tools work. Flex, do you use those? If you do, would you mind explaining a bit your workflow?
Reply With Quote top
  #14  
Old 03-05-2010, 05:49 PM
crazyfly1's Avatar
crazyfly1 crazyfly1 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Colorado Springs Co. USA
Posts: 733
Re: the beginning (color profile)

erikerxon,
Lot's of good info here so far.
I am pretty much "all Adobe, all the time". I open everything from the new beta of Lightroom and Lightroom's color space is Prophoto with no option to change it. I import into Photoshop with my working space being Prophoto as I always shoot RAW. If I'm going to print or web I view gamut warnings first and usually have to rachet down the color a bit. As some folks have said, with technology being what it is now, I don't think your working space matters much between RGB and Prophoto, however I would not save an image for archival purposes in anything less than the widest possible space (Prophoto) because Epson may come out with a printer that will print it or Apple may come out with a monitor that can show it tomorrow, you never know.
Reply With Quote top
  #15  
Old 03-05-2010, 08:40 PM
KR1156 KR1156 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: outside of the box.
Posts: 628
Re: the beginning (color profile)

i use capture one as much as i can, unless the shoot was captured with another capture program, i prefer capone over anything. I also make sure to get the photog's settings from the shoot.

my RGB workspace is adobe rgb 1998. It has a wide color gamut that handles all of cmyk's gamut. some friends use colormatch bc they feel adobe rgb 1998 is too warm and don't like to deal with cmyk conversion problems that may occur with adobe rgb 1998, but colormatch only uses about 80% of cyan in cmyk which can be a drawback. Colormatch can save some headache, but if you're experienced, adobe rgb 1998 is fine with cmyk conversions.

prophoto has too wide of a gamut to me...i mean you're never gonna get most of it in print, so why work in it...can do some damage when you convert that may be hard to fix in the end.
Reply With Quote top
  #16  
Old 03-07-2010, 06:27 AM
flexmanta's Avatar
flexmanta flexmanta is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Spain
Posts: 339
Re: the beginning (color profile)

Apwizard:
Yes, i use various conversions for mainly 2 reasons.
1. RAW's exposure latitude is wider than psd's or tiff's. The exposure slider is linear (as in not gamma), and it will clip. So, say you have a high key photo that you don't want to be so high key, you make a darker conversion, right? But what if the hair is black? It might clip. So, the best thing to do is to process one conversion exposed for for the skin, and then make a second conversion with the shadows opened up with the fill light slider (dynamic range in CaptureOne), and then merge them in photoshop. If you want the hair darker but you don't want it to clip, you can curve it down with gamma in photoshop. Remember Gamma will not clip anything.

2: The color temperature sliders are actual LAB like controls for the A and B chanels of a photo. Again, there is still more latitude here per channel than there is in 16bpc rgb. So, i will not rely 100% on the temp and tint sliders in my raw converter, but i use it to get myself in the ball park. Warm skin and unbelievable blue eyes? Make 2 conversions, one for the skin, one for the eyes, merge, done.

FREYA
Hola. Yeah, about the skin tone sliders... they are tricky. Think of them as a tool for when the photographer hasn't used a grey card. When there's a grey card in one of the photos in the series, you will just click it with the white balance gun, and tell the program "look, this should be neutral". So, when there's no grey card and there's skin in the photo, you have a way to tell the software "look, this is skin", and it gives you a couple built in skin colors. The ones that come with the program suck. Maybe the light pink one is ok, and you have to use it on fairy light areas of the skin. Maybe the top of the cheeks. The problem is it doesn't cover all the skins, so, what you can do is start with one of the presets and then tweak it. What this tool will do is set the white balance of the photo to make that skin look how you want it, and the rest of the tonality of the image will be modified accordingly.

You don't have to use it only on skin, as you can define a skin tone preset for say, an apple. You click on the apple in that photo and tell the program "this is apple red" and the rest of the colors will also be corrected. You can also use that preset across a full series.

There's more you can do with this approach to color correction, as there are ways to selectively correct skin by the use of somewhat of a mask. I don't use these too much, but there's one slider that does wonders which is the uniformity slider. It's simple. Click on a part of the skin which color you like, increase the uniformity slider, and the rest of the skin will come closer to the clicked tone. It works great for cooler hands than bodies...

blah

Last edited by flexmanta; 03-07-2010 at 06:53 AM.
Reply With Quote top
  #17  
Old 04-15-2010, 08:14 AM
erikerxon erikerxon is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: London
Posts: 7
Re: the beginning (color profile)

please, leave comments in my another post: http://www.retouchpro.com/forums/har...aphers-pc.html - i'm buying a new pc and your opinion is important.
Reply With Quote top
Reply

  RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Retouching


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Beginning In This Beautiful Business fatima Work/Jobs 4 06-03-2007 12:43 PM
Operation Photo Rescue - Beginning and End klassylady25 Photo Restoration 11 10-24-2006 08:30 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:29 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright © 2016 Doug Nelson. All Rights Reserved