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Question to "High pass sucks" technique

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  #11  
Old 09-25-2010, 12:52 PM
Flashtones Flashtones is offline
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Re: Question to "High pass sucks" technique

One use of the split is to degrunge, rather than the inverted highpass, because you get much less edge blurring.

Something like this:

http://www.model-citizens.com/Tutori...paration-1.wmv
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  #12  
Old 09-25-2010, 01:08 PM
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BagLady BagLady is offline
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Re: Question to "High pass sucks" technique

Hi Setcamper,

The low frequency layer (blurred layer) contains color blobs, shadows and highlights.
The high frequency layer contains the detail (no color) detracted from the blurred layer.

These two layers put together make up the original image.... So why split the image in two?

So that you can adjust the details without messing up the underlying color/shadows/highlights and adjust the "color blobs" without ruining the details. Here's a quick explanation on how to do it:

Put these two layers in a group above your original image (so that you can easily see the comparison between this group and your background layer).

Examine the blurred layer first... look for the unwanted blotches/color and correct with whatever method you prefer (healing, cloning, painting, smudging and even a bit of blurring here and there).

Then take a look at the high frequency layer (with all layers visible)... correct unwanted details by healing or cloning.

I hope this helps!
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  #13  
Old 09-25-2010, 02:28 PM
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mistermonday mistermonday is offline
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Re: Question to "High pass sucks" technique

Quote:
Originally Posted by BagLady View Post
Hi Setcamper,

The low frequency layer (blurred layer) contains color blobs, shadows and highlights.
The high frequency layer contains the detail (no color) detracted from the blurred layer.
Just one clarification to what Baglady has written. The high frequency layer actually does contain color (unless you go through a secondary process to move it all to the LF layer). If you wish to see the color and where it resides, just do a Ctrl+U (Hue/Sat) and drag the saturation slider all the way to the right.
In a normal freq separation, the HF layer contains all the edges which are equal to and less than the chosen Radius and the colors that resided on both sides of those edges are intensified (contrast has increased along those edges). Conversely on the Low Frequency layer below, the same edges at the same radius have had contrast reduced (edges blurred). When the two layers are added together (function of the Linear Light Blend mode) the result is the original image. GB + HP = Original.
You are pretty safe using the healing brush on the HF layer because it tend to copy and blend in texture without taking all of the color. However you need to be careful using the Clone Stamp tool when trying to clone texture from an area of very dissimilar color because the clone tool will take all of the color as well and you can end up with a mess.
Regards, Murray
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  #14  
Old 09-25-2010, 03:30 PM
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BagLady BagLady is offline
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Re: Question to "High pass sucks" technique

@ Mistermonday

OOPS! Sorry for my mistake... I never noticed a significant amount of color in the high frequency layer. I was trying to explain things in a simple manor... In any case, thanks for correcting me Murray!

Regards, Baglady
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  #15  
Old 09-25-2010, 07:55 PM
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mistermonday mistermonday is offline
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Re: Question to "High pass sucks" technique

Hi Baglady, no need to apologize. To almost everyone an HP layer looks like a colorless grayscale layer. It's not really obvious unless you know the math and mechanics going on inside PS.
Regards, Murray
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  #16  
Old 09-25-2010, 08:12 PM
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Re: Question to "High pass sucks" technique

Are there any disadvantages or cons, to placing a blank layer above the high frequency one and do the healing using a "current & below" sampler?
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  #17  
Old 09-25-2010, 10:43 PM
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Re: Question to "High pass sucks" technique

Hi Chillin, unfortunately you can't do that because the areas on the blank layer will represent the HF layer only and they can not blend in ADD (lineal light) mode with the GB layer.
The first concern I ever had with Frequency Separation was not having a fully re-editable layer in the HF layer. However in practice it has never been a problem and the speed and efficiency of that layer in the workflow far outweighs the risk.
Regards, Murray
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  #18  
Old 09-26-2010, 12:52 AM
Flashtones Flashtones is offline
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Re: Question to "High pass sucks" technique

Quote:
Originally Posted by mistermonday View Post
Hi Chillin, unfortunately you can't do that because the areas on the blank layer will represent the HF layer only and they can not blend in ADD (lineal light) mode with the GB layer.
The first concern I ever had with Frequency Separation was not having a fully re-editable layer in the HF layer. However in practice it has never been a problem and the speed and efficiency of that layer in the workflow far outweighs the risk.
Regards, Murray
Just to further MM's point:

I tend to amass far too many layers too quickly, but in doing so there's really no risk. Either, A) make the split from stamp visible layers, such that one could always regenerate the split again from the image below, or, B) dupe the HF layer and clone on the dupe, keeping a virgin copy turned off until one is satisfied the cloning is good, then trash the virgin, or, if need be blend the two with masks then merge them.

There's always an exit strategy if you use enough layers. ;-)

Also, this is from the original ModelMayhem thread, though I haven't tried it:

Quote:
Just a quick tip to share.

If you are like me and don't like to clone/heal onto the original layers but instead onto a blank layer, this could present a problem when cloning/healing with the High Frequency layer. The only way to do this is to select "Current layer" for your sample. This would cause you to have to go back and forth from the HF layer to the blank layer each time you want to resample. Or, if you want to use "Current & below" for your sample, you can hide all layers below the HF layer but then you will only see the grey-ish HF layer which is not always the easiest to judge how the changes you are making will look in the final.

Cheer up, there's a way to change this to use "Current & below" for your sample and still see what the overall will look like so you can see what your changes are doing to the final. And it's very simple.

1. Hide all layers below the HF layer.
2. Make a copy of your LF layer and place it above the HF and HF heal/clone layers.
3. Change this copy to blend mode "Overlay".
4. Unhide this copy.

You should now see something that looks very close to the original. Close enough that you can determine what your cloning/healing on the HF is doing to the overall image. You can now also keep the HF heal/clone layer active and for sample use "Current & below" since the only layer visible below that is the HF layer.

You can also create an action that will hide all the layers below HF and unhide the LF copy and another action to do the opposite. Or, if you're like me, use a script that will do this for you as soon as you select the HF heal/clone layer and change it back when you select another layer.

I hope this is useful for some of you.

There may be other uses for this, also. I haven't explored the possibilities.
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  #19  
Old 09-26-2010, 01:20 AM
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chillin chillin is offline
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Re: Question to "High pass sucks" technique

Thank you Murray, you got me thinking...again


Quote:
Originally Posted by Flashtones View Post
Just to further MM's point:

....or, if need be blend the two with masks then merge them.

There's always an exit strategy if you use enough layers. ;-)

:
Thank you Flashtones, this will work for me.
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File Type: jpg Freq_Sep.jpg (63.3 KB, 68 views)
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  #20  
Old 09-26-2010, 01:37 AM
Flashtones Flashtones is offline
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Re: Question to "High pass sucks" technique

That's very clever, chillin, well done.
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