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Photo Retouching "Improving" photos, post-production, correction, etc.

How to get this color mood result?

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  #11  
Old 08-02-2010, 02:23 AM
Luke Kaven Luke Kaven is offline
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Re: How to get this color mood result?

In CS4 I use a BW layer to get the basic filtering right, and then add a gradient layer on top of that. Start with a basic Black to White gradient. Then you can sample the example photos to get the exact tones at several levels from darkest to lightest, and enter the values into the color stops on the gradient layer. The toning on the example images might be a solid color, or it might not be.

An alternate method would be to use a curve to recreate the same tones. Take your example photo, create a duplicate layer and desaturate it. Next bring up the photo you want to tone, and add a curve adjustment layer above it. Go back to your sample photos (toned and untoned versions), and sample the untoned and toned version at the same position in the image, with 4-5 values ranging from darkest to lightest. So for example, one spot in the picture might be 128/128/128 (desaturated) and the toned version is 130/128/127. So you'd edit the curve layer for the three color channels creating one point for each color at 128,130; 128,128; 128,127. This would recreate the exact tones.

Both workflows are 16 bit throughout for the smoothest tonal transitions until the final step.
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  #12  
Old 08-06-2010, 08:33 PM
qpixo qpixo is offline
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Re: How to get this color mood result?

It looks really complicated this alternate method.
In curve do you have to play with R,G,B channel separated or RGB only?

>> Next bring up the photo you want to tone, and add a curve adjustment layer above it.
What value?

>>128/128/128 (desaturated) and the toned version is 130/128/127
Are these values supposed to be using Hue Saturation adjustment?
Can't make it right... I'm getting a bit frustrated.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Luke Kaven View Post

An alternate method would be to use a curve to recreate the same tones. Take your example photo, create a duplicate layer and desaturate it. Next bring up the photo you want to tone, and add a curve adjustment layer above it. Go back to your sample photos (toned and untoned versions), and sample the untoned and toned version at the same position in the image, with 4-5 values ranging from darkest to lightest. So for example, one spot in the picture might be 128/128/128 (desaturated) and the toned version is 130/128/127. So you'd edit the curve layer for the three color channels creating one point for each color at 128,130; 128,128; 128,127. This would recreate the exact tones.

Both workflows are 16 bit throughout for the smoothest tonal transitions until the final step.

Last edited by qpixo; 08-06-2010 at 09:08 PM.
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  #13  
Old 08-06-2010, 09:22 PM
qpixo qpixo is offline
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Re: How to get this color mood result?

I don't get the method of using gradient

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Originally Posted by Luke Kaven View Post
I'd recommend a gradient layer for toning by far over duotone. Duotone is a recipe for layering inks in an offset process to enhance perceived dynamic range and is limited to 8 bit values. Gradients provide a much wider range of possibilities and allows for a 16-bit workflow throughout.
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  #14  
Old 08-06-2010, 11:46 PM
Flashtones Flashtones is offline
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Re: How to get this color mood result?

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Originally Posted by qpixo View Post
I'm trying to get the exactly result but still couldn't get it right (using hue desaturated and played with color balance)

Does anyone know how to get EXACTLY the same color result in Photoshop?

http://i232.photobucket.com/albums/e...quang/test.jpg
Try this. Open the above photo in PS. Use your eyedropper to sample the yellow tone in the sky, setting that as your highlight color. Hit the X key and sample from the purple water to set your shadow color. Now create a Gradient Map adjustment layer (Gradient Map, not Gradient). It will automatically use the foreground/background colors you just set. Set that Gradient Map layer to Color blend mode.

On/off the visibility of that layer to see if it's a match. You want it to look as similar as possible with the GM layer on and off. Chances are you will need to adjust your gradient map colors. Open up the Gradient Map and see beneath the colored bar there are endpoint triangles. Double click each one to open up the color picker. You'll probably need to increase the saturation of each and possibly shift their hue a bit. Unfortunately, the moves aren't dynamically previewed so you need to accept your changes to see their effect on the shot. Keep adjusting them until the image looks the same with the GM layer on or off.

When you've got it right, all you have to do is drag that GM adjustment layer to the top of the layer stack of the file you'd like to treat. Then tweak to taste. And it's probably prudent that both files be in the same color space to begin with.
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  #15  
Old 08-07-2010, 12:39 AM
Luke Kaven Luke Kaven is offline
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Re: How to get this color mood result?

The only thing more ridiculous than using photoshop is talking about using photoshop. But I think I can improve on my shorthand. Somewhere there is a good writeup on this curve technique, but I can't find it right now.

You have two things...(i) an example image like the ones you showed us, that has just the toning you say you want, and (ii) your own target image, converted to BW form, that you would like to tone the same way.

Open the example image as one document, and open the target image as another. Keep your image in 16 bit form throughout.

The problem is this -- you want to map from the gray tones in your target image, to the corresponding colored tones that you get from the example image.

The curve adjustment tool does exactly this and does it simply. At each point along the curve, the curve adjustment takes the X value as input, and produces the Y value as output. This is a simple /map/ function. One value as input (X) is /mapped/ to a corresponding value as output (Y). The input comes of course from your source image, and the output is just whatever you want it to be, including your toning scheme. With one curve tool, you can produce three curves, one for each of the three R,G,B channels, and this is how you'll be doing it.

You will make R,G,B curves that produce the colors you want at each point from black to white. To make these curves, you need to sample the colors from your example image at a few places, let's say 5, for black, white, middle gray, quarter gray, three-quarters gray.

Middle gray in your image is let's say RGB=128,128,128. Right? Now flip to your example image, and choose a pixel to represent middle gray. Let's say the eyedropper comes up with RGB=130,128,127. What you want to do is make it so that every instance of RGB=128,128,128 is turned into RGB=130,128,127. So every time the RED value is 128, the output RED value is changed to 130; every time the GREEN value is 128, the output GREEN value is changed to 128; every time the BLUE value is 128, the output BLUE value is changed to 127.

So you go to the RED curve, and create a point with X (input) of 128, and Y (output) of 130; you go to the GREEN curve, and create a point with X (input) 128, and Y (output) of 128; and you go to the BLUE curve, and create a point with X (input) 128, and Y (output) of 127.

So now you've set it so that every instance of RGB=128,128,128 is changed to RGB=130,128,127.

Then you repeat this process until you've sample black, quarter gray, middle gray, three-quarters gray, and white. Each of the three RGB curves will have these five points on them. Each of those points will of course be toned exactly as you set them, and all of the points in between will be interpolated.

You can do this for almost any toning scheme, as long as it is more or less continuous.

Does this make a bit more sense?
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  #16  
Old 08-08-2010, 09:55 AM
qpixo qpixo is offline
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Re: How to get this color mood result?

By default while open document image or any image, the mode is 8bits/channel, even straight from camera.

What is difference when convert to 16bit mode?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Luke Kaven View Post
Open the example image as one document, and open the target image as another. Keep your image in 16 bit form throughout.

The problem is this -- you want to map from the gray tones in your target image, to the corresponding colored tones that you get from the example image.

Does this make a bit more sense?
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  #17  
Old 08-08-2010, 12:04 PM
Luke Kaven Luke Kaven is offline
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Re: How to get this color mood result?

You should strive for a 16-bit workflow throughout. Are you shooting JPGs? I strongly recommend shooting RAW and capturing to 16-bit TIF for all your editing.
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  #18  
Old 08-08-2010, 08:18 PM
qpixo qpixo is offline
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Re: How to get this color mood result?

Yeah I'm always shooting in Raw but converted into JPEG before with 8bits only. Now does it has a big different result for print purpose converting into 16bit TIFF format instead to do any retouch?

thanks for answering,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Luke Kaven View Post
You should strive for a 16-bit workflow throughout. Are you shooting JPGs? I strongly recommend shooting RAW and capturing to 16-bit TIF for all your editing.
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  #19  
Old 08-08-2010, 08:48 PM
Luke Kaven Luke Kaven is offline
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Re: How to get this color mood result?

Yes, I'd say it makes a big difference for all but the most trivial adjustments. Use the highest bit-depth you can use until the very last step. Don't look back.
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