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Dodge & Burn (Layer blending modes)

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  #21  
Old 11-26-2010, 12:50 PM
Adrianr Adrianr is offline
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Re: Dodge & Burn (Layer blending modes)

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Originally Posted by mistermonday View Post
True. There are many ways to do D&B and still achieve the same results. After experimenting each person discovers which method is best or most effective for him/her

Regards, Murray
Murray, I also use the blank layer set to colour mode for the corrections when D&B'ing, but I'm curious when you say you can just use a brush to correct areas. I normally use the clone stamp (providing there is enough clean source nearby of course) because with a brush only sampling one particular colour I find it looks very flat. Do you do anything to combat this or just not find it a problem?
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  #22  
Old 11-26-2010, 01:52 PM
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Re: Dodge & Burn (Layer blending modes)

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Originally Posted by Adrianr View Post
Murray, I also use the blank layer set to colour mode for the corrections when D&B'ing, but I'm curious when you say you can just use a brush to correct areas. I normally use the clone stamp (providing there is enough clean source nearby of course) because with a brush only sampling one particular colour I find it looks very flat. Do you do anything to combat this or just not find it a problem?
Cloning is OK when you have clean nearby source. More often than not, the source is not clean especially when you are dodgeing fine lines or pores in a minefield of uneven skin texture. If you are not careful you with the clone tool you will negate the D&B work to the point where you might as well just used the clone tool in the first place.
You are correct that painting with a single sample brush can give the area a flat look. So whne cloning is not a good option, I use one of two others.
1. Multiple samples from good adjacent area on the fly limiting the stroke to short distances
2. Alt+Drag the D or B mask onto the color correction layer. Do a levels command to blow to white the areas of the mask (or paint in overlay mode) which were not dodged to 100% opacity (which is most of it). The mask will protect areas which have not been dodged or burned allowing you to paint more quickly. You will still need to sample adjacent color but less often. You can also use the clone tool depending on the image.
If you use option 2, it means you will need two recolor layers - one for the dodge and one for the burn. Try it out, you may find it very efficient.
Regards, Murray
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  #23  
Old 11-26-2010, 03:55 PM
Adrianr Adrianr is offline
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Re: Dodge & Burn (Layer blending modes)

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Originally Posted by mistermonday View Post
Cloning is OK when you have clean nearby source. More often than not, the source is not clean especially when you are dodgeing fine lines or pores in a minefield of uneven skin texture. If you are not careful you with the clone tool you will negate the D&B work to the point where you might as well just used the clone tool in the first place.
You are correct that painting with a single sample brush can give the area a flat look. So whne cloning is not a good option, I use one of two others.
1. Multiple samples from good adjacent area on the fly limiting the stroke to short distances
2. Alt+Drag the D or B mask onto the color correction layer. Do a levels command to blow to white the areas of the mask (or paint in overlay mode) which were not dodged to 100% opacity (which is most of it). The mask will protect areas which have not been dodged or burned allowing you to paint more quickly. You will still need to sample adjacent color but less often. You can also use the clone tool depending on the image.
If you use option 2, it means you will need two recolor layers - one for the dodge and one for the burn. Try it out, you may find it very efficient.
Regards, Murray
Thanks for the indepth response, but I was more referring to your last point where you say you can use it over large areas with a single brush stroke. I generally really like the colour layer trick. It can save a massive amount of time providing you've got a good source to work with. As I say the only problem is how quickly it can end up looking very flat and mono-tone, which is generally only a problem for me when dealing with larger areas. I just wondered if there was perhaps a setting I was missing (perhaps using some sort of colour/saturation jitter could work?).

I'l definitely try the trick stealing the layer mask from the D&B layer for protection though, never thought of doing that! Great tip
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  #24  
Old 11-26-2010, 07:14 PM
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mistermonday mistermonday is offline
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Re: Dodge & Burn (Layer blending modes)

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Originally Posted by Adrianr View Post
Thanks for the indepth response, but I was more referring to your last point where you say you can use it over large areas with a single brush stroke. I generally really like the colour layer trick. It can save a massive amount of time providing you've got a good source to work with. As I say the only problem is how quickly it can end up looking very flat and mono-tone, which is generally only a problem for me when dealing with larger areas. I just wondered if there was perhaps a setting I was missing (perhaps using some sort of colour/saturation jitter could work?).

I'l definitely try the trick stealing the layer mask from the D&B layer for protection though, never thought of doing that! Great tip
Sometimes you need to dodge a large area that has only a brightness problem and it should be a uniform color. But where you have lots of texture and different colors that need to be preserved, a broad brush will flatten it so that is where either the mask or just selective painting with a small brush is the way to go. Also worth noting is that when an area has been only lightly dodged / burned the saturation / color shift is not significant enough to require a correction.

Regards, Murray
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