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Photo Retouching "Improving" photos, post-production, correction, etc.

a very bad skin

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  #21  
Old 12-03-2010, 02:16 PM
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mistermonday mistermonday is offline
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Re: a very bad skin

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Originally Posted by kav View Post
I don't maintain rules on blending modes. Luminosity blending is situational imo. I wouldn't personally jump back and forth too much on those two layers, as you'd create the same problem, overlapping work. You could go through on a "brightening curve" layer, check your work, and remove or fade back anything that didn't go quite according to plan by painting the mask back toward black again. Then do a pass on the referred to "darkening" layer once the region is pretty clean on the lightening layer. Basically you're better off not assigning conflicting instructions between your layers when it comes to the micro details of an image. If I had to do broader shading or something like that I'd use separate layers altogether from those that where I'm doing micro adjustments so as to be able to adjust things like shading without risking ruining fine detail work if it has to be edited later.
Like Chain I find it more accurate to use separate D&B curves. I do all the work I can on the D layer and then all the work on the B layer. I almost never have to go back and correct and when I do I can either fade with a black brush or paint with a white brush on the opposie layer. I often use two sets of curves, one for the micro work which I do first, then a second set above for the macro work (light contouring). Doing the macro on the same layer is very unforgiving if you screw it up.
Having a good set of visualization tools allows you to make accurate adjustments at the micro level so you don't need to do almost any rework.
Regards, Murray
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  #22  
Old 12-03-2010, 04:02 PM
julianmarsalis julianmarsalis is offline
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Re: a very bad skin

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Originally Posted by mistermonday View Post
Like Chain I find it more accurate to use separate D&B curves. I do all the work I can on the D layer and then all the work on the B layer. I almost never have to go back and correct and when I do I can either fade with a black brush or paint with a white brush on the opposie layer. I often use two sets of curves, one for the micro work which I do first, then a second set above for the macro work (light contouring). Doing the macro on the same layer is very unforgiving if you screw it up.
Having a good set of visualization tools allows you to make accurate adjustments at the micro level so you don't need to do almost any rework.
Regards, Murray
+1

I also like the control you have with the curve layer makes it easy to set max highlight and shadow value. But many ways to skin this cat
just becomes about what your the most comfortable doing and getting the results you desire so many ways to lighten and darken a pixel in ps.....
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  #23  
Old 12-04-2010, 04:23 PM
qbic qbic is offline
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Re: a very bad skin

Thank you all for your responses!

our discussion made me think about two other things, a bit off topic.

When you have a really bright photo (bright skin) do you darken it temporarily while retouching the skin, in order to reveal the other imperfections (those visible only when photo is darker)?
I usually do this. Am I right or I just add extra work to myself?

And do you retouch regarding what size the photo is going to be used? I.e. assuming you know the photo is going to be printed / displayed 25% of the original size, do you make it look good at target size only?
It's obvious that retouching skin to look it good at 25% takes less time than for 100%.

I'm very curious what your opinion is about that.
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  #24  
Old 12-04-2010, 04:41 PM
kav kav is offline
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Re: a very bad skin

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Originally Posted by qbic View Post
Thank you all for your responses!

our discussion made me think about two other things, a bit off topic.

When you have a really bright photo (bright skin) do you darken it temporarily while retouching the skin, in order to reveal the other imperfections (those visible only when photo is darker)?
I usually do this. Am I right or I just add extra work to myself?

And do you retouch regarding what size the photo is going to be used? I.e. assuming you know the photo is going to be printed / displayed 25% of the original size, do you make it look good at target size only?
It's obvious that retouching skin to look it good at 25% takes less time than for 100%.

I'm very curious what your opinion is about that.
Edit: when I talk about smaller sizes here as opposed to the next post, I'm referring to theoretically if you can only spend a very brief amount of time and are sure this is to only be used below a certain size.

That's not something I usually do personally. If a bunch of images were appearing in print 2" high and they had a very small budget, it would actually be pretty logical. Most of the time I wouldn't scale down what I see. It's just important to be able to envision how this will look in its end presentation so that you can be selective in what you retouch.

Last edited by kav; 12-06-2010 at 03:36 AM.
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  #25  
Old 12-04-2010, 11:08 PM
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Re: a very bad skin

Wavelet Decompose Degrunging and some selective healing brush work.
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File Type: jpg 5bd7a.jpg (46.7 KB, 68 views)
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  #26  
Old 12-05-2010, 06:53 AM
qbic qbic is offline
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Re: a very bad skin

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Originally Posted by kav View Post
It's just important to be able to envision how this will look in its end presentation so that you can be selective in what you retouch.
What about the skin imperfections that you can see only when viewed at 100%. Would you choose to leave it as it is?
I usually tend to retouch them anyway in case the photo would be used in a bigger size some time in the future. But it seems I do some extra work that won't make no difference for smaller-size view.
So I've started to think whether it makes sense?

Last edited by qbic; 12-05-2010 at 07:01 AM.
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  #27  
Old 12-05-2010, 08:04 AM
kav kav is offline
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Re: a very bad skin

Viewing at 100% is good. My point was that with a really large image file it can be deceptive at times. Something might look like a huge bump or whatever, when it works quite well when viewed as a synergetic component of the overall image. I think some of the dots and things look worse to you because of what surrounds them (currently pimples in some areas and stuff). This stuff should be surgical. You're not looking to flatten it out to nothingness (I hope). If you go too far, you're likely to end up with a combination of lower quality work for a higher amount of time spent. That kind of image with bad form could yield a less pleasing result with a far greater amount of time invested.

Since I haven't brought this up yet, did you have a target time to completion for something like this? I didn't go into a 20 minute method but more emphasized knowing what you want to change so as not to waste any time along the way.
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  #28  
Old 12-06-2010, 05:54 AM
qbic qbic is offline
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Re: a very bad skin

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Originally Posted by kav View Post
You're not looking to flatten it out to nothingness (I hope).
No I don't. then I could save lots of my time and use GB at the beginning I always look for quality results .

Quote:
Originally Posted by kav View Post
Since I haven't brought this up yet, did you have a target time to completion for something like this? I didn't go into a 20 minute method but more emphasized knowing what you want to change so as not to waste any time along the way.
I control the time during retouching though I don't panic and stop the work in the middle when I see that it's a bit beyond the time I set at the beginning.

Thank you Kav for your help
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